Best closed headphones?
May 25, 2012 at 9:04 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 36

arvbuddy

New Head-Fier
Joined
Jan 30, 2012
Posts
33
Likes
0
Hello again! So this time I've come back and I am looking for suggestions.
 
I Mostly like to listen to screamo, dubstep, trance, and rock.
 
I listen to my headphones everywhere, especially at school so they need to be closed
 
Money is no object because if the headphones are that good, I will find a way to get them :)
 
Right now I've been checking into the Beyerdynamics T5p, what are your thoughts on that?
 
I honestly want to know your thoughts! Thanks a lot in advance! Ask any questions that will help you help me!
 
May 26, 2012 at 12:41 PM Post #8 of 36

MattTCG

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jan 22, 2012
Posts
15,557
Likes
3,369
Damn!! Where have I been? Just checked the Beyer website and saw several new models. Why are the reviews not all over head-fi?
 
May 26, 2012 at 12:53 PM Post #10 of 36

Lorspeaker

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Nov 29, 2010
Posts
7,277
Likes
517
i doubt t5p will give u the kind of dubadubadubbbbbbbass u wanna hear in dubstep, it is weak in quantity  
popcorn.gif

 
 
May 27, 2012 at 2:57 AM Post #13 of 36

KimLaroux

1000+ Head-Fier
Joined
Aug 2, 2011
Posts
1,090
Likes
69
Check out the Denon line: D2000, D5000 and D7000. Although those don't isolate much, they are known for their bass response. 
 
There's also the Shure SRh940 and the AKG K550 which might suits you. I am not familiar with these but this forum has enough text dedicated to them to give you a good idea...
 
May 27, 2012 at 3:22 AM Post #14 of 36

devouringone3

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Aug 28, 2011
Posts
1,542
Likes
95
Location
Canada, QC
Fostex TH900.
 
D7000 is also superb, but when cost-no-object, TH900 is superior, by a hearable margin.
 
Closed headphone is a bit of a weird market though... D2-5-7k and TH900 are not the most closed headphones around even though they fall in this category. If you want more noise isolation I would suggest Ultrasone Signature Pro.
 
 
Well, to start, ohm ratings have absolutely nothing to do with the intrinsic quality of a product.
 
An ohm is just a measurement, like an inch or a liter.

 
I've read somewhere that higher impedance was better, that it gave better control of the diaphragm's overall mass and movements... I don't know if that make sense but I'm really only vaguely remembering what I had read about it.
 
Higher impedance is less practical to me... and headphones needs to be practical in my book.
 
But I would dissent and definitely say that it's related to intrinsic quality, and sound quality too.
 
What do you mean "ohm is just a measurement"? Measurements, and the units they're in, makes all the difference in our daily lives, lol. I mean, we build bridges with measurements. I think they are super important. You don't want a headphone that is 2 millimeters tall either, lol, but I'm joking now.
 
May 27, 2012 at 4:33 AM Post #15 of 36

KimLaroux

1000+ Head-Fier
Joined
Aug 2, 2011
Posts
1,090
Likes
69
Lower impedance means you mean more current to control the diaphragm. Higher impedance means you need more voltage to control the diaphragm.
 
So at this point, it all comes down to what type of amplifier will be used to drive the headphone. An amplifier with lots of current on top but little voltage swings will make low impedance headphones sound better than 600 Ohm ones. And vice versa. At least that's just theory. Real life is much more complicated than this.
 
A general rule of thumb is, forget about high impedance headphones if you don't have an amplifier able to power them. (High voltage swings). Forget about 600 Ohm, or even 300, driven from you netbook's audio out.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top