PS1000 Impressions Thread
Apr 3, 2016 at 12:05 AM Post #2,956 of 3,602

joseph69

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  Can you guess the reason why I had forgotten that I had previously posted these pics?
size]

Yes, I would bet my life on it! 
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Apr 3, 2016 at 6:59 PM Post #2,957 of 3,602

stacker45

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  Yes, I would bet my life on it! 
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Other's might, but I won't even ask you to say what it is, that's how confident I am, regarding how well you know me.
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Apr 4, 2016 at 10:02 AM Post #2,959 of 3,602

ruthieandjohn

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This is my point…every PS1K I've owned has had an overwhelming mid-bass which I needed to get used to after not listening to them for a period of time being it bled into the clarity/detail/air between the instruments, but not the current pair I just received. So from my experience owning 3 different PS1K's, this being my 4th these by far have the least mid-bass allowing me to hear the clarity/details/air between the instruments like I hear with the (e) but with the rich/full mid-bass of the PS1K…but not overwhelming like my others which makes them sound fantastic. This to me is 100% proof of inconsistencies of the PS1K sound-signature first hand. 

I'm curious as to whether my PS1000s have this mid-bass bleed, but not quite sure what to listen for. What music did you use that highlights the problem? Thanks!
 
Apr 4, 2016 at 11:37 AM Post #2,960 of 3,602

joseph69

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I'm curious as to whether my PS1000s have this mid-bass bleed, but not quite sure what to listen for. What music did you use that highlights the problem? Thanks!

John, 
I couldn't hear the fine details and separation as well with my prior PS1K's as I definitely do with my current pair. Every time I read a post from another member who owned the PS1K they would describe the mid/upper frequencies being sparkly, which I didn't find with any of my prior pairs…I could hear the mid-high frequencies, but not as much as I do now due to them having a prominent mid-bass (which my current pair doesn't have) which bled/drowned out mid/upper frequency detail/separation/air between the instruments…so it made it difficult to hear clearly, especially percussion instruments/fingers sliding on guitars/ect, which is why I went with the (e) series which has a much less prominent mid-bass…but like I said, my current PS1K does not have this issue so I now hear all of the details/separation/air between the instrument clearly like other owners have described. And don't get me wrong, my prior pairs sounded excellent, but not as clear. I listen to 90's Grunge/Contemporary/Smooth/Lounge Jazz, but of course the recording quality would also play a big role in this as well…but still, I don't find this with my current PS1K. 
It could be that the serial # on my current pair is in the 1800's which is a low number. @stacker4545 said he had bought his PS1K in 2010, and our #'s are very close, both are in the 1800's. And of course you can't rule out different variations between the same models, which many have agreed on with the higher priced Grados.
 
Apr 4, 2016 at 4:09 PM Post #2,961 of 3,602

stacker45

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The reason why I got my GH-1 and my Bushmills mixed up, is because of my meds, 100mg of Oxycodone a day, can affect your short term memory.
 
Now, where was I, oh yeah!,
 
The reason why I got my GH-1 and my Bushmills mixed up, is because of my meds, 100mg of Oxycodone a day, can affect your short term memory.
 
Apr 5, 2016 at 12:09 AM Post #2,962 of 3,602

ruthieandjohn

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Comparison of Grado PS1000 vs. PS1000e vs. GH1
 
Using my test method of ranking the performance of each of three headphones upon each of 10 acoustic features (1st place - blue ribbon, 2nd place red, 3rd place yellow, ties for first is purple, ties for second is orange), I compared the Grado PS1000 vs. the Grado PS1000e vs. the Grado GH1 with the G Cush over-ear pads rather than the stock on-ear pads.  I used the Joseph Grado HPA1 amp, driven by the Schiit Bifrost Multibit Uber USB2 connected via S/DIF serial coax to my FiiO X3 player.
 
In the table below, best performance in the row of one of 10 acoustic tests is given 3 points; second place gets 2, third place gets 1.  Ties for first get 2.5; ties for second get 1.5 point.  Hence, higher scores are better.
 

Though it is not really appropriate, it is fun to add up the total rank order score of each headphone to produce the total, as well as a score rank ordering, shown on the bottom line.  This is not really appropriate because it gives equal weight to each of the 10 criteria; we tend to prefer some aspects (e.g., soundstage) over others (e.g., discern added chord) yet this weights them equally in forming the total score.
 
The PS1000 scored the highest in the most categories (transparency, width of sound stage, shaker variation, which is a measure of treble detail).  The GH1 scored the highest in bass pitch perception, i.e., preserving a deep bass line's upper harmonics sufficiently to discern a reliable pitch of the note.  The PS1000e, was particularly good at resolving two closely-spaced singers on the stage.
 
PS1000:  This headphone had the highest transparency.  It was less sensitive than the other two; volume had to be turned up a bit to match levels.
 
PS1000e This headphone seemed tighter, having a faster decay of bass notes and tightening up the acoustic size of a singer to allow resolving the position of one singer close to another. It was the heaviest of the headphones, due to its 50 mm drivers and associated mass holding them.
 
GH1:  This headphone was the lightest and most comfortable. It provided a lot of treble detail in the face of broad-frequency rapidly-changing music, e.g., preserving the treble harmonics of low organ and brass notes and preserving the harmonics that allow determining the pitch of a subbass note.
 
I love them all!
 
Apr 5, 2016 at 12:54 PM Post #2,965 of 3,602

ruthieandjohn

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Quote:
  @ruthieandjohn when did you get the ps1000e?

 
I was privileged to buy the PS1000e's from joseph69.  These are the Grados With A Past!  We all eagerly read, perched on the edge of our seats, as @joseph69 conducted his odyssey from his home of Grado to the land of Stax and back, and as he explored various PS1000s, acquired his PS1000e, put on his sleeves to relieve strain on the rods, and put his black band grips around each ear to protect them.  Yes, we ALL know them, because we have ALL followed the saga of joseph69!
 
They sound fabulous!  
 
And of course I treat them with the respect that they are due.
 
I have outfit a mansion for them to live in, customized with their name on its roof!
 

 
 
And of course I have engaged the services of The Grado Model Lady, originally seen introducing the PS500 headphones, then cruelly cast aside with the advent of Grado's -e series.  Here is how she looked in the Grado ad...
 

 
 
After she snared my heart and started me on my path to acquire every Grado headphone in the world by selling me my first, she disappeared from the Grado website.
 
But *I* have memorialized her as my holder for my new PS1000es when I am not wearing them:
 

 
Not only that, joseph69 provided me with the 15 foot extension cord that Grado provides, so I can place it in series with my extension cords from my PS1000, GS1000e, and the one I bought for my RS1i, so I can wear my PS1000s while jogging (just have to be sure not to go farther than the length of the string of cords!)
 
Apr 5, 2016 at 8:53 PM Post #2,967 of 3,602

krud484

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  John, 
I couldn't hear the fine details and separation as well with my prior PS1K's as I definitely do with my current pair. Every time I read a post from another member who owned the PS1K they would describe the mid/upper frequencies being sparkly, which I didn't find with any of my prior pairs…I could hear the mid-high frequencies, but not as much as I do now due to them having a prominent mid-bass (which my current pair doesn't have) which bled/drowned out mid/upper frequency detail/separation/air between the instruments…so it made it difficult to hear clearly, especially percussion instruments/fingers sliding on guitars/ect, which is why I went with the (e) series which has a much less prominent mid-bass…but like I said, my current PS1K does not have this issue so I now hear all of the details/separation/air between the instrument clearly like other owners have described. And don't get me wrong, my prior pairs sounded excellent, but not as clear. I listen to 90's Grunge/Contemporary/Smooth/Lounge Jazz, but of course the recording quality would also play a big role in this as well…but still, I don't find this with my current PS1K. 
It could be that the serial # on my current pair is in the 1800's which is a low number. @stacker4545 said he had bought his PS1K in 2010, and our #'s are very close, both are in the 1800's. And of course you can't rule out different variations between the same models, which many have agreed on with the higher priced Grados.


Sparkly?!
biggrin.gif

  Comparison of Grado PS1000 vs. PS1000e vs. GH1
 
Using my test method of ranking the performance of each of three headphones upon each of 10 acoustic features (1st place - blue ribbon, 2nd place red, 3rd place yellow, ties for first is purple, ties for second is orange), I compared the Grado PS1000 vs. the Grado PS1000e vs. the Grado GH1 with the G Cush over-ear pads rather than the stock on-ear pads.  I used the Joseph Grado HPA1 amp, driven by the Schiit Bifrost Multibit Uber USB2 connected via S/DIF serial coax to my FiiO X3 player.
 
In the table below, best performance in the row of one of 10 acoustic tests is given 3 points; second place gets 2, third place gets 1.  Ties for first get 2.5; ties for second get 1.5 point.  Hence, higher scores are better.
 

Though it is not really appropriate, it is fun to add up the total rank order score of each headphone to produce the total, as well as a score rank ordering, shown on the bottom line.  This is not really appropriate because it gives equal weight to each of the 10 criteria; we tend to prefer some aspects (e.g., soundstage) over others (e.g., discern added chord) yet this weights them equally in forming the total score.
 
The PS1000 scored the highest in the most categories (transparency, width of sound stage, shaker variation, which is a measure of treble detail).  The GH1 scored the highest in bass pitch perception, i.e., preserving a deep bass line's upper harmonics sufficiently to discern a reliable pitch of the note.  The PS1000e, was particularly good at resolving two closely-spaced singers on the stage.
 
PS1000:  This headphone had the highest transparency.  It was less sensitive than the other two; volume had to be turned up a bit to match levels.
 
PS1000e This headphone seemed tighter, having a faster decay of bass notes and tightening up the acoustic size of a singer to allow resolving the position of one singer close to another. It was the heaviest of the headphones, due to its 50 mm drivers and associated mass holding them.
 
GH1:  This headphone was the lightest and most comfortable. It provided a lot of treble detail in the face of broad-frequency rapidly-changing music, e.g., preserving the treble harmonics of low organ and brass notes and preserving the harmonics that allow determining the pitch of a subbass note.
 
I love them all!


A knockout read @ruthieandjohn! I'm not burning a whole in my pocket to hear a PS1ke anymore!
 
Congrats on getting those from @joseph69! They went to a fantastic home! I'm sure there was a nice discount, a little you must own 15 or more Grados to get 15% off.
wink.gif
 
 
Apr 5, 2016 at 11:14 PM Post #2,969 of 3,602

krud484

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  I know…but this is what I've read several times in others descriptions of the high frequencies. 
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Well it's not an easy term to use convincingly on just any headphone. Depending on the equipment, a headphone amp could be described as having that sparkle on the highs. What you were describing paints a perfect picture of what I think of when it comes to that word.
 
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Apr 5, 2016 at 11:26 PM Post #2,970 of 3,602

ruthieandjohn

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  John, 
I couldn't hear the fine details and separation as well with my prior PS1K's as I definitely do with my current pair. Every time I read a post from another member who owned the PS1K they would describe the mid/upper frequencies being sparkly, which I didn't find with any of my prior pairs…I could hear the mid-high frequencies, but not as much as I do now due to them having a prominent mid-bass (which my current pair doesn't have) which bled/drowned out mid/upper frequency detail/separation/air between the instruments…so it made it difficult to hear clearly, especially percussion instruments/fingers sliding on guitars/ect, which is why I went with the (e) series which has a much less prominent mid-bass…but like I said, my current PS1K does not have this issue so I now hear all of the details/separation/air between the instrument clearly like other owners have described. And don't get me wrong, my prior pairs sounded excellent, but not as clear. I listen to 90's Grunge/Contemporary/Smooth/Lounge Jazz, but of course the recording quality would also play a big role in this as well…but still, I don't find this with my current PS1K. 
It could be that the serial # on my current pair is in the 1800's which is a low number. @stacker4545 said he had bought his PS1K in 2010, and our #'s are very close, both are in the 1800's. And of course you can't rule out different variations between the same models, which many have agreed on with the higher priced Grados.

My wonderful PS1000s are SN # 1185... must be earlier than 2010 vintage!
 

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