Classical music discussion, what do you like?
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CanadianMaestro

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^ ....well, in many classical works, from quartets up to symphonies, there can be many repeats of musical phrases.....yet they don't always bore me. Unlike the pop repeats.
 
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gerelmx1986

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The deeper I go with orchestration & opera, the more repetition of pop with the same line & chord progression disinterests me.

This includes new releases that, in years past, I would have pounced on.

Others find a similar pattern?

I’ve not listened to a pop album since last year.

I blame Qobuz.:ksc75smile:
in general.modern pop and rock, rap etc, is made by talentless brats that wanna be famous. (Thwy use sampled chord progs with a music software on a computer and they call it music)
 
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CanadianMaestro

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tsk tsk, we must not come across as too snotty, folks. Classical musik enthusiasts have been accused of that. And the musik itself has been labelled (by some) as being "too deep" or intellectually inaccessible. Too bad. It's not true -- you don't need any special training, musical or otherwise, to enjoy classical. I got into it after hearing the Emperor Concerto on the radio 25 yrs ago. Been hooked since. I would say I listen to classical/pop 95/5% of the time now. (I distinguish pop from classic ROCK, which I still enjoy very much).
cheers
 
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Christer

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In the last year, even nostalgia began to lose its shine.

Listening for complexities was hard to turn off.

I also began to take note how the same phrase is repeated...over and over again.

Well as CM says Classical music is also often built on repetitions.
.
But the repetitions are not always identical as in simple monotonuos mechanical pop.

Bach was an absolute master of subtly changing repetitions

Another good example of repetitions is the first movement of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata where the basic right hand triole pattern G#C# E is repeated almost throughout the whole movement.
But subtly varied, into G"D F" A C#E and other combinations inversed, transposed and shifting from left to right hand combined with an accompaning line of harmonizing and even dissonant chords both in the bass and treble.
Masterly music, full of complexities that may sound easy, but not so easy to play!

It is indeed POPULAR imho SOO much more REAL MUSIC than most pop.

I know I may offend some by saying so, but I don't say so to insult anyone, but again imo a lot of pop is on the same level as Donald Duck or Superman is to great litterature for adult minds.
There are different "cognitive" complexities appreciation levels in music too imo.
I have to admit that Hoffman's mechanical wind up singing doll still makes me smile too!
A fun introduction to music for little kids indeed.

Cheers CC
 
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Well as CM says Classical music is also often built on repetitions.
.
But the repetitions are not always identical as in simple monotonuos mechanical pop.

Bach was an absolute master of subtly changing repetitions

Another good example of repetitions is the first movement of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata where the basic right hand triole pattern G#C# E is repeated almost throughout the whole movement.
But subtly varied, into G"D F" A C#E and other combinations inversed, transposed and shifting from left to right hand combined with an accompaning line of harmonizing and even dissonant chords both in the bass and treble.
Masterly music, full of complexities that may sound easy, but not so easy to play!

It is indeed POPULAR imho SOO much more REAL MUSIC than most pop.

I know I may offend some by saying so, but I don't say so to insult anyone, but again imo a lot of pop is on the same level as Donald Duck or Superman is to great litterature for adult minds.
There are different "cognitive" complexities appreciation levels in music too imo.
I have to admit that Hoffman's mechanical wind up singing doll still makes me smile too!
A fun introduction to music for little kids indeed.

Cheers CC

Thanks for weighing in—I was hoping you’d comment.
 
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in general.modern pop and rock, rap etc, is made by talentless brats that wanna be famous. (Thwy use sampled chord progs with a music software on a computer and they call it music)
I forgive you because you posted a properly sized picture last time. that kind of miracle, IMO, cancels out this bad post :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:. otherwise I would have crucified you on the spot, as a SJW, the art arc.

here is my simple approach to art criticism. 2 cases:
- I judge stuff within an art genre I know and love. when within that genre, something cruelly disappoints me, I let my knowledge, taste, and passion for the genre do the talking and I go destroy(verbally!!!!!) that particular piece of work and the dude who did it.
- I don't like an art genre and don't really "get it", as my criteria for good art aren't even found within that specific yet successful genre. I'm probably not qualified to judge it, so I say that I don't like it and stop there. like the way I'd discuss seafood while the entire table is enjoying it.


you don't need any special training, musical or otherwise, to enjoy classical.
I'm a living example of that.
well... full disclosure. at one point I could do the Star spangled banner on the recorder, so maybe I do qualify as a trained musician.
 
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tsk tsk, we must not come across as too snotty, folks. Classical musik enthusiasts have been accused of that. And the musik itself has been labelled (by some) as being "too deep" or intellectually inaccessible. Too bad. It's not true -- you don't need any special training, musical or otherwise, to enjoy classical. I got into it after hearing the Emperor Concerto on the radio 25 yrs ago. Been hooked since. I would say I listen to classical/pop 95/5% of the time now. (I distinguish pop from classic ROCK, which I still enjoy very much).
cheers
agree, I am not a musician and received little training and.like.classical music since I was .probably eight years old. Startd.with some dusted.off CD from my father.

My previous rant excludes classic rock and pop from the 60s to the 80s. Many classic rock andmpop singers s from the 70 yo th 80s were.indeed conservatory trained
 
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Christer

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Thanks for weighing in—I was hoping you’d comment.
Maybe your grandchild will also like Papageno's Vogelfänger aria and the Papageno Papagena papa-papa aria from the Magic Flute?
It is also a good humorous introduction to classical music for young kids.
And if Papageno is properly dressed up in feathers kids usuallly love the way he looks too.
Cheers CC
 
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Another interesting video is the 'what happened to melody' video where the author talks of music having a "hook" today----like a short commercial designed to get our attention quickly.

I think it is this one:


 
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Another interesting video is the 'what happened to melody' video where the author talks of music having a "hook" today----like a short commercial designed to get our attention quickly.

I think it is this one:



Oliver Sacks wrote a wonderful book yrs ago, called "Musicophilia". He describes some of his neurological patients and their extraordinary musical talents (or deficits in some cases). In the book, Sacks mentions "earworms", tunes that really stick to your brain and are impossible to get rid off.

A fav example of an earworm for me is the old Coca Cola commercial tune....

 
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Maybe your grandchild will also like Papageno's Vogelfänger aria and the Papageno Papagena papa-papa aria from the Magic Flute?
It is also a good humorous introduction to classical music for young kids.
And if Papageno is properly dressed up in feathers kids usuallly love the way he looks too.
Cheers CC
sweet tune, that Papageno.

also try
Flight of the Bumblebee
Peter and the Wolf
Queen of the Night aria (again from Magic Flute)
Wiegenlied (Brahms)
Nutcracker (Tchaikovsky)
Fur Elise (Beethoven)

 
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I have been enjoying Mieczyslaw Weinberg's (1919-1996) music.
DG just released a CD of his Symphonies Nos. 2 & 21. Great stuff.
I'm also enjoying his Violin Sonatas on CPO label. A very fine composer who
lived in the shadows of his friend Shostakovich, but has been re-evaluated lately.
 
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Peter Hyatt

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I have been enjoying Mieczyslaw Weinberg's (1919-1996) music.
DG just released a CD of his Symphonies Nos. 2 & 21. Great stuff.
I'm also enjoying his Violin Sonatas on CPO label. A very fine composer who
lived in the shadows of his friend Shostakovich, but has been re-evaluated lately.

I struggled w “Warsaw”...

I need to move on to his other works.
 
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great recording!

That was probably the first Bruckner recording I'd ever heard. You're right, of course: it's a fine interpretation. I remember listening to the cassette on one of these as a teenager.





Back then, I used to listen to a Mahler or a Bruckner symphony every night (when I was supposed to be sleeping).
 

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