Sony MDR-MV1
Apr 16, 2023 at 4:13 AM Post #76 of 474
Sony MDR-MV1 - if everything that is written about them in advertising turns out to be true - it will be the fastest decline in history of all other audiophile headphone manufacturers)
The exception of course will be Neumann NDH 30. They will live with the Sony MDR-MV1)

This time I really want to believe advertising and marketing from Sony) Let's see...
 
Last edited:
Apr 16, 2023 at 9:37 AM Post #77 of 474
Sony MDR-MV1 - if everything that is written about them in advertising turns out to be true - it will be the fastest decline in history of all other audiophile headphone manufacturers)
The exception of course will be Neumann NDH 30. They will live with the Sony MDR-MV1)

This time I really want to believe advertising and marketing from Sony) Let's see...

Question of product quality and reliability also... sony seems to of taken a dive on that recently...
 
Apr 16, 2023 at 10:43 AM Post #78 of 474
At this price point I am not surprised that it doesn't come with the balanced option unlike the MDR-Z1R.
Just be thankful it’s not wireless/Bluetooth.
 
Apr 16, 2023 at 10:46 AM Post #79 of 474
Sony MDR-MV1 - if everything that is written about them in advertising turns out to be true - it will be the fastest decline in history of all other audiophile headphone manufacturers)
The exception of course will be Neumann NDH 30. They will live with the Sony MDR-MV1)

This time I really want to believe advertising and marketing from Sony) Let's see...
Food for thought. These are $399. The Z1R was $2300.
 
Apr 16, 2023 at 11:12 AM Post #80 of 474
Found this elsewhere. Not clear if that’s a Sony cable.

1681658009951.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Apr 16, 2023 at 12:02 PM Post #81 of 474
Here's my first ever product 'review' on Head-Fi! I am merely a humble hobbyist who enjoys music, and that's about it. I am not familiar with audio engineering nor do I work in a studio. I'll leave the charts, measurements and comparisons (with other headphones) to the respected seasoned veterans. Therefore, I feel that submitting this as a comment in this thread feels more appropriate than submitting a full review. I'd like to apologise in advance if I wrote anything wrongly or if it is far from factual. Please, do correct me if I am wrong.

Thank you for reading!

Disclaimer: This Sony MDR-MV1 is a pre-production* unit and I do not own it. I am NOT paid to write this review. This is 100% of my own personal opinion and your experience may vary.


DSC01807-2.jpg

Pros:
Comfortable (wearability and 'listenability')
Amazing highs and mids
Superior female vocals
Very good value for money
Great imaging and instrument separation


Cons:
Bass feels underwhelming, punch is lacking. Looming sub bass is missing
Average soundstage

Stock earpads are too thin/soft (tip of my ears are always touching the drivers)*
Stock cable is too long and no 4.4 balanced cable provided




1. Design, quality & built

Straight out of the box, I can immediately feel just how light it is. Overall construction doesn't feel as flimsy or cheap as the Sony MDR-7506 or the Sony WH-1000XM5, but it lacks the solid finishing and premium feel like the Sony MDR-Z1R and higher end Audeze or Focal. You won't hear any creaking from the plastic compared to the Sennheiser HD 6XX. The headband feels very soft (I love it!) but the earpads* may be a little too soft and thin for some. Durability is okay as I managed to stretch it around without deforming it or hearing any cracks from it. From time to time, I can feel the tip of my ears touching the driver and that could be distracting to some. But fret not, it IS comfortable and prolonged listening sessions won't be an issue. If you are concerned with heat, it's hardly noticeable (mind you, I live in a hot and humid southeast Asia country). IF you're like me who enjoys sleeping to the sound of music, I can say that this MDR-MV1 is comfortable and durable enough to fall asleep with.

The stock cable feels nice and soft. But darn it, it's just too long for normal users like me. Minimal microphonics (compared to the Kimber Kable MUC-B20BL1 that I have on my MDR-Z1R) and the screw-in connector part is well designed. It's missing a 4.4mm balanced cable, but at this price point I really can't ask for more.

2. Sound
Tested with my personal Sony DMP-Z1 (Direct Source: ON | DSD Remastering: OFF), running on battery, with the stock unbalanced cable provided.


DSC01812.jpg


I definitely need to let this unit burn in for a longer period. But listening fatigue is hardly there, and I find myself enjoying this unit through prolonged listening hours. It's hard to leave it alone. It doesn't sound too bright and the imaging is amazing. Instruments like acoustic guitars and drum cymbals aren't too distracting but it's there. The imaging and instrument separation on this headphone (being one created especially for Spatial Sound, according to Sony) is really fantastic at this price range. Every strum from the guitar, hit from the cymbals, and every key from the piano are clearly separated. Listening to Daft Punk's "Horizon" (or music from the band 'Vulfpeck') is a good benchmark to test it's imaging and instrument separation. I don't find myself purposely straining my ears (or increasing the volume to dangerous levels) to distinguish between each sound and each instruments. It's really hard to find any fault within the highs and mids for this headphone. If I really want to find a fault; it would probably be the lower-mids range of this headphones. Male vocals doesn't sound as impressive as female vocals especially when it involves screaming.

One thing that caught my attention is just how great female vocals are. Listening to "Above & Beyond - Love Is Not Enough (Acoustic)" made me realise how good it is at reproducing female vocals. Adele's "Rolling In The Deep", Elaine's "1-to-2", Mondo Grosso's "Time [Vocal: Bird]", Mellisa Menago's "Hallelujah", Kirinji's "Killer Tunes Kills Me (feat. YonYon)", and HEIZE's "(From the Rain) ft. Ahn Ye Eun" vocal sounded really clean and precise. So soothing to my ears, so good. The sibilance is well controlled without hurting my ears too much.

Moving on to the lower frequencies, you'll find that it's actually there and that's about it. There's nothing remarkable in bass reproduction, it's easily forgotten because the mids and highs are really overwhelmingly good. The open back design may contribute to this. Don't get me wrong, bass is good enough, it doesn't sound muddy and it's plentiful for normal listening. Basshead may find themselves disappointed with the MDR-MV1's low-mids and lower frequencies. It lacks the punch, kick and lingering sub-bass from the Sennheiser HD 6XX that I have or from my vague memories from listening to Audeze's LCD series and the new MM-500. Listening to Deadmau5's "Some Chords" intro is enough to explain the lack of sub-bass lingering around. However, I believe that through some EQ, 3rd party earpads and cables may be able to help in this aspect. However, if you are into the likes of bright headphones (for an extreme example, Sennheiser HD 800 S), the bass may be more than enough for you.

A little personal note: rock music with a lot of electric guitar riffs may not be it's strength. Listening the likes of 'Linkin Park', '30 Seconds to Mars', 'Within Temptation' and 'Muse' is enjoyable but I find myself steering away from rock music with the MDR-MV1.

2.1. Mini headphones comparison

V.S. Sony MDR-Z1R

The Z1R is a little too bright for me at some point, but it's bearable because the soundstage and tonality is better (also, the range of lower frequencies is wider). Listening to "Ali - Lost In Paradise" is a torture with the cymbals (sibilance) continuously distracting me from the music and hurting my ears. With the MDR-MV1, things felt pretty much balanced and you can still enjoy the little details from the highs. However, the soundstage from the MDR-Z1R is just too good and it made the MDR-MV1 felt a little too narrow. Also, I find that the MDR-Z1R reproduces rock music better than the MDR-MV1. Do I really have to compare the weight of these two? Nah, it's a no brainer.

V.S. Sennheiser HD 6XX
The lower frequencies and kick from the bass is still better than the MDR-MV1. However, the MDR-MV1 imaging is much more superior especially when it comes to reproducing those little background noises [e.g finger snaps you hear from Micheal Jackson's "Billie Jean", the background guitar strums from SawanoHiroyuki[nZk]'s "A/Z <MOD> (feat. Mizuki)"]. Little details that are easily missed on the HD 6XX is no longer an issue with the MDR-MV1. Generally, I'll return to the HD 6XX if I want some headbanging sessions or House/EDM genres.


3. Summary
TLDR; there's only one thing that's stopping me from pre-ordering the MDR-MV1. And that is the Audeze MM-100. As someone who has preferences towards bass, I have a soft spot towards the Audeze's Planar Magnetic drivers. And recently, I tried the Audeze MM-500 and absolutely love it. Bass lovers should not completely avoid the MDR-MV1 as well. You may find yourself liking the subtle yet minimalistic bass presentation for a more comfortable listening experience. I suggest to perhaps try this with a different cable or earpads in the near future to see if the lower frequency ranges can be improved without hurting the mids and highs. If they (Audeze) have NOT announced the MM-100, I'll pre-order the MDR-MV1 immediately.

I foresee the Sony MDR-MV1 as a rising favourite among fellow audiophiles (and probably even more so with a balanced cable). Out of the box without any EQ, the sound itself is already a class above it's price range. It's easy to drive (even with a smartphone) and you can carry it with you whever you go since it's very light.

Final score based on price range:
Construction/build: 7/10
Comfort: 8/10
Soundstage: 7/10
Instrument Separation: 10/10
Imaging: 10/10
Highs: 10/10
Mids: 9/10
Lows: 6/10

*This is a pre-production unit, therefore some minor things around the build/material quality (not including drivers) may be different on the final design.
 
Last edited:
Apr 16, 2023 at 1:59 PM Post #82 of 474
Sounds like a substantial upgrade of the 7506. Which is what I was expecting, given that it’s designed for studio use.

And personally, I find the MDR1A and 1AM2 to have too much bass, so the MV1 might strike a fine balance.
 
Apr 16, 2023 at 2:02 PM Post #83 of 474
Here's my first ever product 'review' on Head-Fi! I am merely a humble hobbyist who enjoys music, and that's about it. I am not familiar with audio engineering nor do I work in a studio. I'll leave the charts, measurements and comparisons (with other headphones) to the respected seasoned veterans. Therefore, I feel that submitting this as a comment in this thread feels more appropriate than submitting a full review. I'd like to apologise in advance if I wrote anything wrongly or if it is far from factual. Please, do correct me if I am wrong.

Thank you for reading!

Disclaimer: This Sony MDR-MV1 is a pre-production* unit and I do not own it. I am NOT paid to write this review. This is 100% of my own personal opinion and your experience may vary.


DSC01807-2.jpg
Pros:
Comfortable (wearability and 'listenability')
Amazing highs and mids
Superior female vocals
Very good value for money
Great imaging and instrument separation


Cons:
Bass feels underwhelming, punch is lacking. Looming sub bass is missing
Average soundstage

Stock earpads are too thin/soft (tip of my ears are always touching the drivers)*
Stock cable is too long and no 4.4 balanced cable provided




1. Design, quality & built

Straight out of the box, I can immediately feel just how light it is. Overall construction doesn't feel as flimsy or cheap as the Sony MDR-7506 or the Sony WH-1000XM5, but it lacks the solid finishing and premium feel like the Sony MDR-Z1R and higher end Audeze or Focal. You won't hear any creaking from the plastic compared to the Sennheiser HD 6XX. The headband feels very soft (I love it!) but the earpads* may be a little too soft and thin for some. Durability is okay as I managed to stretch it around without deforming it or hearing any cracks from it. From time to time, I can feel the tip of my ears touching the driver and that could be distracting to some. But fret not, it IS comfortable and prolonged listening sessions won't be an issue. If you are concerned with heat, it's hardly noticeable (mind you, I live in a hot and humid southeast Asia country). IF you're like me who enjoys sleeping to the sound of music, I can say that this MDR-MV1 is comfortable and durable enough to fall asleep with.

The stock cable feels nice and soft. But darn it, it's just too long for normal users like me. Minimal microphonics (compared to the Kimber Kable MUC-B20BL1 that I have on my MDR-Z1R) and the screw-in connector part is well designed. It's missing a 4.4mm balanced cable, but at this price point I really can't ask for more.

2. Sound
Tested with my personal Sony DMP-Z1 (Direct Source: ON | DSD Remastering: OFF), running on battery, with the stock unbalanced cable provided.


DSC01812.jpg

I definitely need to let this unit burn in for a longer period. But listening fatigue is hardly there, and I find myself enjoying this unit through prolonged listening hours. It's hard to leave it alone. It doesn't sound too bright and the imaging is amazing. Instruments like acoustic guitars and drum cymbals aren't too distracting but it's there. The imaging and instrument separation on this headphone (being one created especially for Spatial Sound, according to Sony) is really fantastic at this price range. Every strum from the guitar, hit from the cymbals, and every key from the piano are clearly separated. Listening to Daft Punk's "Horizon" (or music from the band 'Vulfpeck') is a good benchmark to test it's imaging and instrument separation. I don't find myself purposely straining my ears (or increasing the volume to dangerous levels) to distinguish between each sound and each instruments. It's really hard to find any fault within the highs and mids for this headphone. If I really want to find a fault; it would probably be the lower-mids range of this headphones. Male vocals doesn't sound as impressive as female vocals especially when it involves screaming.

One thing that caught my attention is just how great female vocals are. Listening to "Above & Beyond - Love Is Not Enough (Acoustic)" made me realise how good it is at reproducing female vocals. Adele's "Rolling In The Deep", Elaine's "1-to-2", Mondo Grosso's "Time [Vocal: Bird]", Mellisa Menago's "Hallelujah", Kirinji's "Killer Tunes Kills Me (feat. YonYon)", and HEIZE's "(From the Rain) ft. Ahn Ye Eun" vocal sounded really clean and precise. So soothing to my ears, so good. The sibilance is well controlled without hurting my ears too much.

Moving on to the lower frequencies, you'll find that it's actually there and that's about it. There's nothing remarkable in bass reproduction, it's easily forgotten because the mids and highs are really overwhelmingly good. The open back design may contribute to this. Don't get me wrong, bass is good enough, it doesn't sound muddy and it's plentiful for normal listening. Basshead may find themselves disappointed with the MDR-MV1's low-mids and lower frequencies. It lacks the punch, kick and lingering sub-bass from the Sennheiser HD 6XX that I have or from my vague memories from listening to Audeze's LCD series and the new MM-500. Listening to Deadmau5's "Some Chords" intro is enough to explain the lack of sub-bass lingering around. However, I believe that through some EQ, 3rd party earpads and cables may be able to help in this aspect. However, if you are into the likes of bright headphones (for an extreme example, Sennheiser HD 800 S), the bass may be more than enough for you.

A little personal note: rock music with a lot of electric guitar riffs may not be it's strength. Listening the likes of 'Linkin Park', '30 Seconds to Mars', 'Within Temptation' and 'Muse' is enjoyable but I find myself steering away from rock music with the MDR-MV1.

2.1. Mini headphones comparison

V.S. Sony MDR-Z1R

The Z1R is a little too bright for me at some point, but it's bearable because the soundstage and tonality is better (also, the range of lower frequencies is wider). Listening to "Ali - Lost In Paradise" is a torture with the cymbals (sibilance) continuously distracting me from the music and hurting my ears. With the MDR-MV1, things felt pretty much balanced and you can still enjoy the little details from the highs. However, the soundstage from the MDR-Z1R is just too good and it made the MDR-MV1 felt a little too narrow. Also, I find that the MDR-Z1R reproduces rock music better than the MDR-MV1. Do I really have to compare the weight of these two? Nah, it's a no brainer.

V.S. Sennheiser HD 6XX
The lower frequencies and kick from the bass is still better than the MDR-MV1. However, the MDR-MV1 imaging is much more superior especially when it comes to reproducing those little background noises [e.g finger snaps you hear from Micheal Jackson's "Billie Jean", the background guitar strums from SawanoHiroyuki[nZk]'s "A/Z <MOD> (feat. Mizuki)"]. Little details that are easily missed on the HD 6XX is no longer an issue with the MDR-MV1. Generally, I'll return to the HD 6XX if I want some headbanging sessions or House/EDM genres.


3. Summary
TLDR; there's only one thing that's stopping me from pre-ordering the MDR-MV1. And that is the Audeze MM-100. As someone who has preferences towards bass, I have a soft spot towards the Audeze's Planar Magnetic drivers. And recently, I tried the Audeze MM-500 and absolutely love it. Bass lovers should not completely avoid the MDR-MV1 as well. You may find yourself liking the subtle yet minimalistic bass presentation for a more comfortable listening experience. I suggest to perhaps try this with a different cable or earpads in the near future to see if the lower frequency ranges can be improved without hurting the mids and highs. If they (Audeze) have NOT announced the MM-100, I'll pre-order the MDR-MV1 immediately.

I foresee the Sony MDR-MV1 as a rising favourite among fellow audiophiles (and probably even more so with a balanced cable). Out of the box without any EQ, the sound itself is already a class above it's price range. It's easy to drive (even with a smartphone) and you can carry it with you whever you go since it's very light.

Final score based on price range:
Construction/build: 7/10
Comfort: 8/10
Soundstage: 7/10
Instrument Separation: 10/10
Imaging: 10/10
Highs: 10/10
Mids: 9/10
Lows: 6/10

*This is a pre-production unit, therefore some minor things around the build/material quality (not including drivers) may be different on the final design.
So far, this is not at all what I expected ... If everything that was written is true, then it does not make sense to buy, unfortunately.
The NDH 30 sounds better, more accurate and more interesting than the MM-500. And the weight and price of the MM-500 is three times more. It completely kills the desire to spend more and buy for listening to music or work. And of course the MM-100 will most likely have a silly plastic sound.
So for now it turns out that there is nothing even close to NDH 30 ..)
Let's wait, suddenly a miracle will happen again ...)))
 
Apr 16, 2023 at 2:08 PM Post #84 of 474
So for now it turns out that there is nothing even close to NDH 30 ..)

The Sennheiser HD660S2 is a great alternative to NDH-30, sounds a bit lighter and more airy it's a nice variation to the Senn-driver theme
 
Apr 16, 2023 at 2:46 PM Post #85 of 474
This is not the first open Sony. The MDR-F1:

045_MDR-F1_01.jpg
 
Apr 16, 2023 at 2:59 PM Post #86 of 474
So far, this is not at all what I expected ... If everything that was written is true, then it does not make sense to buy, unfortunately.
The NDH 30 sounds better, more accurate and more interesting than the MM-500. And the weight and price of the MM-500 is three times more. It completely kills the desire to spend more and buy for listening to music or work. And of course the MM-100 will most likely have a silly plastic sound.
So for now it turns out that there is nothing even close to NDH 30 ..)
Let's wait, suddenly a miracle will happen again ...)))
Please, enough with the NDH30 and speculative comparisons to same.

There ARE different sounds for different people.
 
Apr 17, 2023 at 7:01 AM Post #90 of 474
Tried out the MDR-MV1 at NAMM Show this weekend. I absolutely adore the MA900 and I kept my expectations in line for the MV1 since the MV1 was introduced at a pro-audio show vs the MA900 being more of an audiophile targeted headphone.

At the Sony booth it was right next to 7506 and putting them on back to back to compare the two? Yup the MV1 is aiming to target the 7506 more than the MA900. The MV1 came across as bright/lean and a bit thin. Techs wise it was an improvement over the 7506 but it was not a terribly big difference to my ear. And at the price difference between the two headphones, I would have expect more from the MV1. Bass was tight and well controlled at least, no bass bleed into the mids.

Soundstage was alright which I thought was a tad off considering the big emphasis Sony had with their 360 Reality Audio from last year and even more so this year.

Probably the biggest disappointment to me on the MV1 was the all plastic build. Felt rather flimsy like those who own the MA900 understand. At least it kept the weight down was comfy but for the pro-audio crowd that can be rough with their gear, it makes me a little nervous. For similar "audiophile" headphones in the price range its a bit more disappointing given how much smaller companies are making much more premium feeling headphones.

The NW-WM1AM2 they had as a source was a decent choice since they plugged it in with the 4.4mm on both the DAPs there. On the second day I tried it out, one DAP was purposely demoing the 360 Reality Audio tracks and testing out their Aimer track they had vs my iBasso DX320 I brought with the same track but not with the 360 Reality Audio it was clearly the goal, show off 360. The 360 version was more spacious and clearer for vocals and instruments. Sony has this tech in the new Sony gaming headsets, multiple manufacturers have adopted judging from the Sony site and Sony seems quite all in on developing it.

Last year at NAMM, the booth was a little underwhelming as it was just a few computers and the 7506 showing off the 360 Reality Audio software, not much in the way of mics or cameras last year. But Sony had another ace up its sleeve to show off 360.

In the back of the hall they had a demo in a closed off room I had to make an appointment for. In the demo it was a 5.1 setup where the Sony rep put in ear mics in each of my ears. The demo played one sound on each speaker individually, then a test tone, asked me to put on the headphones, another test tone. This got everything calibrated and then the same 5.1 setup started playing and at first it sounded like the speakers were going, the rep then asked me to remove the headphones and it was clear the headphones were the only things playing and it mimicked the speakers 5.1 pretty much exact. It reminded me of the Smyth A16 Realiser demo my friends had tried and explained to me in the past, though sadly I hadn’t had a chance to hear and compare. Least with that demo it was kind of clear Sony is betting big on 360 Reality Audio though it is probably less important about the actual headphone and more with the tech.

Speaking with the reps at Sony about the MV1, the big intent seemed to be making a headphone that would work great with the 360 Reality Audio. In that respect I think it is a success. In pure sound quality for applications outside of that for an "audiophile" market I feel that the MV1 doesn't deliver in this regard. After 15-20 minutes both days with the WM1AM2 or the DX320 I was getting some treble fatigue.
 
headphones.com Stay updated on headphones.com at their sponsor profile on Head-Fi.
 
https://www.headphones.com/ andrew@headphones.com

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top