Hippo VB + FA Eterna OR Sennheiser IE7 OR Radius DDM -> Bass quality and quantity?
Jul 4, 2010 at 1:54 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 30

gimmethatbeatfool

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Hey, I've finally narrowed it down to these 4 IEMS.
 
I'm looking for something that covers all bases of bass, solid mids and highs, and good build quality. Comfort and sound stage is a plus, isolation not so much of a deal. I'm in sore need of something that just satisfies.
 
Granted, I'll probably end up purchasing all 4 of these along the line, but right now I'm a college student, and it goes without saying that I'm trying to use the sheckles that I've put aside for headphones/earphones as efficiently as possible.
 
Do the Eternas and the VBs sound different enough (at least, for a basshead) that purchasing both of them would be worth it? Or would purchasing a single IEM such as the IE7 or the DDM be a wiser decision?
 
 
Thank you all again for your opinions, suggestions, and everything else! :)
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 2:17 AM Post #3 of 30

2rooi123

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^ good suggestion
 
dont bother to buy low-mid range iem's if you plan to take this hobby seriously
 
its will just be a waste of money when time comes
 
go straight to top tier
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 6:17 AM Post #5 of 30

a_recording

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I think the DDM's, for the quality of their sound, are amazing for their price (160 USD or so). Considering that more than a few people here have compared them favourably to some really top tier options, that's a pretty fantastic introduction into top tier sound.
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 8:17 AM Post #6 of 30

takoyaki7

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X2 about the DDMs, their sound is superior to others much more expensive.
   I must add that I demoed some IE8s today and was extremely impressed, but I know they are a good deal more expensive!
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 2:21 PM Post #7 of 30

HappyFi

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Quote:
dont bother to buy low-mid range iem's if you plan to take this hobby seriously

 
 
I would think that starting modest, experiencing the range of offerings, and taking the journey is precisely what a hobbyist does. It's how you develop appreciation, and it's part of the fun. Aye?
 
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 2:34 PM Post #8 of 30

cravenz

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Quote:
 
 
 
 
I would think that starting modest, experiencing the range of offerings, and taking the journey is precisely what a hobbyist does. It's how you develop appreciation, and it's part of the fun. Aye?
 

 
agreed, but at the end of the day, the choice is for the OP to make.
 
I agree that it is a more rewarding journey to work their way up, but I jumped fairly quickly direct to the IE8s and I've never looked back. I'll never have the budget like some of the people here to test out so many different equipment and for that same reason, if we make an informed decision then hopefully we won't live to regret the decision. I certainly haven't and I'm not a critical listener so it really depends on the OP's budget, circumstances etc.
 
But yes, it is far more enjoyable to be able to learn everything from scratch and to enjoy the whole journey and different nuances, if one's budget permits.
smile_phones.gif

 
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 3:31 PM Post #9 of 30

gimmethatbeatfool

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Thank you for all of your opinions and suggestions.
 
I do appreciate that some of you suggest that I dive straight into the deep end of the pool, but right now, I'm 18, in college, and trying to balance both my schooling and my hobbies. I would like to go for the IE8s, but IEMs are not high on my list of priorities.
 
I know I won't be getting as good of an experience (necessarily) than if I were to purchase a more expensive earphone, but from what I've read, that certainly doesn't mean that I am barred from a GOOD listening experience given my budget.
 
How does the DDM compare to the VB and the Eterna on the low-end? Judging from Jokers review, it does seem to have great bass, but he says the focus is on the mids (definitively not a bad thing if the bass is superior or equivalent to the VB or the Eterna)
 
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 3:46 PM Post #10 of 30

HappyFi

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[size=medium]
^^well said.
 
^Both the Hippo and Eterna are highly praised independent of their cost. If the extra $80 seems a little painful for the DDM, I doubt you could go wrong with either of them. 
 
Also bear in mind that college is a place where things like that get lost, stolen, or dropped into the toilet you slept hunched over.
[/size]

 
Jul 4, 2010 at 8:16 PM Post #11 of 30

a_recording

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I'm trying to avoid being overly enthusiastic about my own IEM purchase here, but I've had the DDM's for enough time to calm down a little about them. While I've read from other users that the Hippo and Eterna are impressive headphones and terrifically competent, I haven't heard them described as having the same 'shiver down your spine' imaging and transparency of the DDMs. Irrespective of the amount of bass/treble mix in the sound signature, the overall experience of listening to the IEM in terms of soundstage and how it conveys nuance, harmonics and timbre is what seems to put the top-tier options above the cheaper designs. With a 15mm bass driver, it can very liberally dish out as much or as little bass as it wants. It's just physics.
 
The first quality IEM's I bought a few years ago when I was starting in College were the RE0's at their original price of ~$260 Australian dollars. I don't regret jumping in with that amount, though it was a lot, because it immediately opened my eyes to what was possible, and it truly was an experience to suddenly hear so much more to the sound. Aim for something magical at decent entry point, because then you won't have to worry or second guess and worry 'what-if'. It'll save you money in the long term. I think...
 
The DDM's let you steal something magical from the real of top tiers for a fraction of the price. Every single other IEM in ljokerl's comparison with a score of 9.75+ for the sound costs more - and for some, several times more. (Sometimes I think that because of new options on the market, ljokerl needs to extend the scale a little so that there aren't so many options bunched around 9-10 lol.) I think your main concern with the DDM's would be the fit - their sound is really quite startling. :)
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 8:26 PM Post #12 of 30

JxK

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Quote:
The DDM's let you steal something magical from the real of top tiers for a fraction of the price. Every single other IEM in ljokerl's comparison with a score of 9.75+ for the sound costs more - and for some, several times more. (Sometimes I think that because of new options on the market, ljokerl needs to extend the scale a little so that there aren't so many options bunched around 9-10 lol.) I think your main concern with the DDM's would be the fit - their sound is really quite startling. :)

The thing with IEMs is that it's more than just sound. They are meant to be portable, which means that an entire host of other factors come into play. Things like build quality, fit, microphonics, comfort, and so on. And by the look of things, the DDM does quite poorly across the board in every factor but sound.
 
Microphonics alone tend to ruin sound. It doesn't matter how nuanced the presentation is if every touch of the cord is magnified and transmitted back to your ears. For me, the DDM looks to be more of a home IEM, and for home listening I'd much rather use a set of fullsize headphones.
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 8:45 PM Post #13 of 30

a_recording

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Quote:
The thing with IEMs is that it's more than just sound. They are meant to be portable, which means that an entire host of other factors come into play. Things like build quality, fit, microphonics, comfort, and so on. And by the look of things, the DDM does quite poorly across the board in every factor but sound.
 
Microphonics alone tend to ruin sound. It doesn't matter how nuanced the presentation is if every touch of the cord is magnified and transmitted back to your ears. For me, the DDM looks to be more of a home IEM, and for home listening I'd much rather use a set of fullsize headphones.

 
True, and I did warn the OP that the DDM's can be a concern in terms of fit...  I'm lucky that I didn't have any issues with the fit, though some people are not so lucky. Microphonics aren't a big problem with the DDMs if you wear them over the ear (It's possible) - no more so then other options like the RE0 or CK90Pro. I've ended up sleeping on top of the DDM's a few times with no ill effects, so I've got no complaints about the build quality. 
 
Just for reference, here's how I wear mine :)
 

 

*EDIT* Just for background, I do wear my DDM's outside. I wouldn't say they are faultless - would I work out with them? No. Wind noise is a bit of an issue too. But they aren't disasters to take outside. I guess it depends on your tolerance. They aren't as quick pop in/out IEMs as others, but on a pure money for sound basis I think its okay to make a few compromises. 
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 8:58 PM Post #14 of 30

JxK

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^
blink.gif

Err...that's a creative way of wearing them. Honestly, I'm glad that they work so well for you. Unfortunately for me, my ears are small, and in the case of my right ear, oddly shaped. So getting a good fit for me usually takes a bit of work, even with well designed IEM casings. For me the DDM would likely be impossible to fit, but yeah, clearly that's not the case for everyone. But yeah, if you can get them to fit well and they sound as good as reported, then the DDMs must be the deal of the year.
 
Jul 4, 2010 at 9:14 PM Post #15 of 30

a_recording

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Quote:
^
blink.gif

Err...that's a creative way of wearing them. Honestly, I'm glad that they work so well for you. Unfortunately for me, my ears are small, and in the case of my right ear, oddly shaped. So getting a good fit for me usually takes a bit of work, even with well designed IEM casings. For me the DDM would likely be impossible to fit, but yeah, clearly that's not the case for everyone. But yeah, if you can get them to fit well and they sound as good as reported, then the DDMs must be the deal of the year.

 
Haha thanks! :) I'm sorry that you aren't getting much love from many options. I have a bit of an oddity in that my left ear is smaller and more sensitive to sibilance as well, especially when I lie down, so I guess the general lesson is that ears suck. However, I've got the kind of ear where I found something like the Sony EX85 really comfortable, so I guess I'm blessed.
 
It is a bit of a minefield with the DDM's I guess, if it turns out the fit is shocking... :/
 
 

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