"You should try them and decide yourself"
Apr 2, 2013 at 9:00 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 17

MetalElvis

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Is anyone else sick and tired when you come here and ask people´s opinions about headphones and they just respond to you "you should try them and decide yourself"? I want to hear OPINIONS and how certain headphones sound and compare to other headphones. I know it´s somewhat subjective, but I want straight up answers if someone thinks certain headphones suck or are great. I´m sick of the diplomatic and cryptic and "try it yourself answers".
 
Please just tell me what you think, tell me is enough/too much there bass, is there enough/too much treble, how bright is the treble compared this headphone, how bassy is the bass compared to that headphone and so on... That´s what this forum is for. There´s very rarely any opportunities to test all these headphones. It´s better to hear opinions than to buy blindly, ´cause I certainly can´t test anywhere pretty much any of these headphones.
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 9:06 AM Post #2 of 17

KamijoIsMyHero

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Well that's the problem with subjective descriptions of headphones, its not always the same for everyone's experience. So saying "you should try them and decide yourself" is really a nice way of saying don't give me crap if you bought those headphones and didn't meet your expectations based on my descriptions.
 
I think the best way is to take time and just research, gather a general concensus of what the headphones are like from various sources. Plus, it restricts you from impulsively buying stuff.
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 9:57 AM Post #3 of 17

ph0rk

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Most of the time, someone has already written at length about a particular headphone. Several someones. Everyone doesn't get their own "help me make this specific purchase" thread.
 
Additionally, more than once I've seen people make reasonable suggestions (like, say, if you want tight, unpronounced bass, stay the hell away from the DT-770 Pro 80) and watched those suggestions be flatly ignored or reasoned away by the original poster. OP then goes on to buy those cans, and then raises hell when they aren't quite like what they convinced themselves they should be like.
 
So, yeah. Go listen to them before you make a purchase you can't unmake, if the money matters. If the money doesn't matter, buy it anyway.
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 2:15 PM Post #4 of 17

money4me247

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lol it's because that you can find so many conflicting opinions about every pair of headphones and even comparisons... so often, it's probably better to just try them on your own, then try to sort through the mess of random subjective opinions.
 
i often see that after one person posts an opinion, the next person posts the opposite opinion...
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 2:31 PM Post #5 of 17

kramer5150

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Its the understood, and universally accepted end-all solution to ANY subjective impression / discussion.  First hand listening is the only way to be almost 100% certain about anything on this forum.  I say "almost" because even a first hand listening impression, only goes so far.  An impression is a FAR different listening experience than living with something every day.
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 3:56 PM Post #6 of 17

Tsujigiri

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No, the more annoying thing is when someone comes on here for a recommendation, flip flops for a month about which headphone to get, and expects everyone here to make all the decisions for him. Getting recommendations and impressions is one thing, but at a certain point you do have to try things for yourself.
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 3:59 PM Post #7 of 17

wolfetan44

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Quote:
No, the more annoying thing is when someone comes on here for a recommendation, flip flops for a month about which headphone to get, and expects everyone here to make all the decisions for him. Getting recommendations and impressions is one thing, but at a certain point you do have to try things for yourself.

This is the worst. Its worse when they make multiple threads. That really pisses me off. 
 
Quote:
Is anyone else sick and tired when you come here and ask people´s opinions about headphones and they just respond to you "you should try them and decide yourself"? I want to hear OPINIONS and how certain headphones sound and compare to other headphones. I know it´s somewhat subjective, but I want straight up answers if someone thinks certain headphones suck or are great. I´m sick of the diplomatic and cryptic and "try it yourself answers".
 
Please just tell me what you think, tell me is enough/too much there bass, is there enough/too much treble, how bright is the treble compared this headphone, how bassy is the bass compared to that headphone and so on... That´s what this forum is for. There´s very rarely any opportunities to test all these headphones. It´s better to hear opinions than to buy blindly, ´cause I certainly can´t test anywhere pretty much any of these headphones.

Thats all opinion. Thats why we say that.
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 4:12 PM Post #8 of 17

pallentx

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I understand the frustration. I went through the same thing. Most of the phones we talk about on here are niche products that aren't easily accessible at the local electronics store, yet they also aren't cheap enough to just order on a whim to see if you like them. Before I bought by Grado SR325is, I read a lot of reviews.
 
From these reviews I determined that these headphones are:
Horribly uncomfortable - not wearable for more than 2minutes
The most comfortable headphones ever made
Extremely harsh in the high frequencies, fatiguing
Perfectly smooth and extremely detailed highs pleasant to listed to for hours
Strong punchy bass
Weak bass -  these are only for treble-heads
 
I think you get the idea. Eventually, I went with my gut. I already had the SR80s and loved the "Grado sound", so I decided to just give them a try. Thankfully, I find them to be exactly what I was hoping for. Similar to my SR80s, but with slightly more deeper bass, less mid-bass, and crazy-amazing detail.
 
I get it. Its hard to get good info, but if I had read the first few reviews complaining about comfort and sibilance and stopped there, I would have possibly been lead the wrong direction. All I can say is if you do seek reviews, make sure you read enough to get a good feel for the full range of people's responses. Beware people who repeat what they've read elsewhere - that effect can make one review seem to outweigh several other just because it caught more eyes.
 
Good luck
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 5:51 PM Post #9 of 17

bedlam inside

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Hi,
Quote:
Is anyone else sick and tired when you come here and ask people´s opinions about headphones and they just respond to you "you should try them and decide yourself"? I want to hear OPINIONS and how certain headphones sound and compare to other headphones. I know it´s somewhat subjective, but I want straight up answers if someone thinks certain headphones suck or are great. I´m sick of the diplomatic and cryptic and "try it yourself answers".


There are several sides to this. 

First, if anyone here bitches too directly about a product that others own (no matter how true the criticism) at least some of the more jumpy owners will jump in to defend their purchase (no matter how irrational such an action is). So many may choose to be diplomatic.

Secondly, both sound quality and wearing comfort are incredibly personal things. Here a bit of sage 50 Years old advise from J. Gordon Holt, who started Stereophile (Magazine). Just replace "speakers" with headphones and so on:


 
Originally written by the late J. Gordon Holt in 1963, Stereophile Magazine

The high-fidelity initiate, bewitched, bothered, and thoroughly confused by the staggering selection of components he must choose from, often turns to a high-fidelity expert to assist him in assembling his dream system. The expert may be a local consultant, a dealer, or a magazine that the prospective buyer trusts as a source of accurate, down-to-ear information.
 
If this seeker of high-fidelity truth is wise, he will consult one expert and no more. The more expert opinions he gets, the more confused he will become, because every expert opinion will be different from all other expert opinions.
 
About the only thing that all high-fidelity experts agree about is that high-fidelity is supposed to be realistic sound reproduction. They may even agree that Marantz amplifiers are pretty good, and that Thorens makes a passable turntable. But try to pin them down about pickups, or other amplifiers, or tuners, or particularly loudspeakers, and one expert's preference is another one's anathema.
 
Of course, any expert worth his salt can tell you why there is so much disagreement. The reason? Well, the other experts, although very nice guys, don't really know what they're talking about. Oh, they're pretty good technical men, mind you, but they don't really have the perceptive ear that's needed for a truly valid musical evaluation of reproduced sound.
 
This is the crux of the matter. Measurements can help to describe a component's performance, but the final criterion for judging reproduced fidelity has always been the ear, and when we start to fall back on subjective judgments, we always end up with a diversity of opinions.
 
It isn't just that "different people hear things differently." Everybody who hears is responding to a set of pressure variations in the air around him, and if these are the same in the living room as they would be in the concert hall, each listener will hear an absolutely realistic replica of the original sounds, regardless of the idiosyncrasies of his own hearing. His ears may have a few response peaks and no response at all above 4000cps, but these weirdities will affect his hearing whether he listens to the original or to the reproduction, so they shouldn't affect his evaluation of the reproduced sound. Except for one thing: The listener with non-existent hearing above 4000cps will be oblivious to any system irregularities above that frequency.
 
The human ear differs in its degree of tolerance to distortion, too. Obviously, the person with high-frequency hearing losses will miss any distortion that is limited to the upper range, but even people with identical hearing acuity vary in their sensitivity to small amounts of distortion that fall within their range of response.
 
A listener can train his ears to pick out all kinds of details in the reproduced sound—peaks, dips, phase shift, imbalance and the like—but many such trained ears have never heard a live orchestra, so they are hardly qualified to tell you what is and what is not realistic. Also, if they have never heard a system with really low distortion or really smooth response (which many experts have not), they will be oblivious to small amounts of muddiness or roughness that will be quite evident to someone who is accustomed to listening to a truly top-quality system.
 
Listeners with identical hearing acuity and identical standards of judgment will usually be highly critical of different aspects of a system's performance. Thus, expert A may be terribly, terribly critical of what happens in the high treble range, expert B may be hypercritical of bass, and expert C may have a Thing about middle-range smoothness or "coloration."
 
We can see how this might influence their judgment of, say, a loudspeaker system. If it is a bit rough at the top, smooth through the middle range, and bass-shy, expert A won't like it much; it will offend his critical ear for treble. Expert C won't be too crazy about it either, because of the low-end deficiency, but expert B, even while admitting that "the top isn't as smooth as I have heard," and "the low end leaves a little bit to be desired," will just as likely sum it up as "one of the most natural, musical-sounding speakers" he has tested.
 
They can all hear the speaker's shortcomings, in the sense that the treble peaks and bass thinness will register on their hearing mechanism, but each picks out that aspect of its performance that is of particular concern to him, and tends to judge it mainly on the basis of that aspect.
 
No equipment critic worth his salt will judge a component solely by one criterion, but it is not at all unusual for an equipment reporter to "slant" his evaluations on the basis of a few things which he considers to be of particular importance. As a matter of fact, it is almost impossible for him to avoid doing this, at least to some extent.
 
High fidelity may be a science, but it isn't an exact science. There are enough things about it that aren't understood to leave room for a goodly amount of educated opinion. This is one field, though, where one man's opinion is not as good as another's.
 
Many writers of books and articles about high fidelity advise the prospective buyer merely to choose what sounds good to him. Certainly there is no sense in anybody's choosing a music system whose sound he doesn't like, but in a field where definite standards of quality exist, simply liking something does not necessarily mean that it is good, by those standards. A person who likes abstract art, for instance, may be judging it by any number of criteria, but resemblance to the original scene is not one of them. If it were evaluated on the basis of its "fidelity," or resemblance to the original scene, it would have to be judged a very poor copy. Similarly, the listener who prefers his sound shrill and brassy is perfectly entitled to his preference, but he is not choosing on the basis of fidelity, either.
 
This raises the question of whether high-fidelity can, or should be, better than the real thing. Certainly it can be made to sound richer, or bigger, or more highly detailed in a recording than it ever is in the concert hall, and the net result may actually be more exciting than anything heard at a live performance. The gimmicked recording may even, on occasion, serve the intent of the music better than a concert hall performance, but whether it sounds better or worse than the original, it is not true to the original, and thus cannot be considered a high-fidelity reproduction.
 
Sound recording may eventually become a creative art in its own right, producing musical sounds that bear no relation to any natural sounds. Indeed, some branches of it—pops and so-called electronic music—are already well on their way in that direction. This is not high fidelity, though, and there's no sense pretending that it is.
 
As long as we are concerned with the realistic reproduction of sound, the original sound must stand as the criterion by which the reproduction is judged, and most hi-fi experts agree that this is as it should be. The problem, however, lies in defining this original that is to be duplicated.
 
F'rinstance, take one symphony orchestra, place it on-stage in one concert hall, and then try listening to it from a) the front row, b) the twentieth row, and c) the fourth row of the second balcony (or peanut gallery). The orchestra will sound quite different from each location, so which of its sounds is the one that best represents the orchestra? Obviously, the sound that is heard from the best seat is the best representation of the orchestral sound, but who is going to claim that his preference for a seating location is the only valid preference, and that anyone who prefers to sit elsewhere has bad judgment? Nobody but a dyed-in-the-wool nut will take this attitude.

 

So, "try it yourself" is not a cop out, but actually a wise answer. I can tell you what I like (just read my reviews), but there is no guarantee that you will like it...

Cheerio Rich
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 6:51 PM Post #10 of 17

newphones

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The requests are so specific sometimes you just want to slap the person who posted it.
 
"Hey, I'm a skateboarder in Simi Valley. What's a good headphone for listening to dubstep while I daydream about smashing pinatas containing mars bars and hershey's kisses in 78 degree heat? Oh, and sometimes I listen to natalie merchant, too. Thanks."
 
 
That, or they're too stupid to realize they can buy ONE GREAT PAIR FOR NEXT TO NOTHING AND BE DONE WITH IT (koss portapro) and instead buy ten pairs of $180 headphones which they wind up hating, and which leads them to invest another $2,000 in dubious upgrades, ie amps, mods and even more expensive headphones. 
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 7:53 PM Post #12 of 17
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Suggestions need to be according to the music being listened to, as well as how loud. That's most of it really. 
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 8:04 PM Post #13 of 17

thecourier

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Quote:
 
which leads them to invest another $2,000 in dubious upgrades, ie amps, mods and even more expensive headphones. 

 
You mean that is not worthwhile upgrading to better gear and modding? interesting. 
This is a hobby, and we spend. 
 
Apr 2, 2013 at 8:22 PM Post #15 of 17

obobskivich

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Most of the time, someone has already written at length about a particular headphone. Several someones. Everyone doesn't get their own "help me make this specific purchase" thread.

Additionally, more than once I've seen people make reasonable suggestions (like, say, if you want tight, unpronounced bass, stay the hell away from the DT-770 Pro 80) and watched those suggestions be flatly ignored or reasoned away by the original poster. OP then goes on to buy those cans, and then raises hell when they aren't quite like what they convinced themselves they should be like.

So, yeah. Go listen to them before you make a purchase you can't unmake, if the money matters. If the money doesn't matter, buy it anyway.


+1. :beerchug:

No, the more annoying thing is when someone comes on here for a recommendation, flip flops for a month about which headphone to get, and expects everyone here to make all the decisions for him. Getting recommendations and impressions is one thing, but at a certain point you do have to try things for yourself.


I feel your frustration. :deadhorse:

Hi,


There are several sides to this. 


First, if anyone here bitches too directly about a product that others own (no matter how true the criticism) at least some of the more jumpy owners will jump in to defend their purchase (no matter how irrational such an action is). So many may choose to be diplomatic.


Secondly, both sound quality and wearing comfort are incredibly personal things. Here a bit of sage 50 Years old advise from J. Gordon Holt, who started Stereophile (Magazine). Just replace "speakers" with headphones and so on:






So, "try it yourself" is not a cop out, but actually a wise answer. I can tell you what I like (just read my reviews), but there is no guarantee that you will like it...


Cheerio Rich


+1. Seriously - it's not a "cop out" or "cryptic" - it's the right answer. I like "wise" as an adjective here as well.

The requests are so specific sometimes you just want to slap the person who posted it.

"Hey, I'm a skateboarder in Simi Valley. What's a good headphone for listening to dubstep while I daydream about smashing pinatas containing mars bars and hershey's kisses in 78 degree heat? Oh, and sometimes I listen to natalie merchant, too. Thanks."


LOL! :L3000:

I think overall the problem here is, and I'm not the first to say this (but I forget who is), that a lot of folks (especially today) are sitting down and going "okay I want headphones" and decide to jump on ye olde Internet and look for advice. And they discover some place like Head-Fi, and decide they'll just pop-in, get an answer for what's the "best" product, go buy it, and be done with it. And of course that never works - firstly because they're asking hobbyists for their opinions of "best" (which is a non-stop discussion), and secondly because they usually go about it in a pretty rude manner (a lot of "help me buy something" threads that I've seen recently are flat-out demands, and the OPs often resort to arguing with, and yelling at, people who are freely trying to help them). I'm not sure what (if any) solution exists for that - at the end of the day you're stuck asking people to change their behavior and attitude, and that's usually not an easy (or fun) discussion to have in person, let alone online (because, you know, there's no rules or laws or stands of decency online, and you can just do whatever you want, to whoever you want, whenever you want, for any reason :rolleyes:).
 

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