Does Harman Target Response Curve matter?

Do you think Harman Target Response Curve matters?

  • Yes.

  • No.

  • Idk.


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Aug 10, 2021 at 5:01 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 15

Wasaabi

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1_Harman-curve-target-response.png
 
Aug 10, 2021 at 9:37 AM Post #8 of 15

Redcarmoose

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“A frequency response balance many prefer.” That’s all it is right there!


That’s all it is...... nothing more nothing less, except it’s based on IEMs sounding like the frequency response-tone of speakers in a room. All Harman is trying to do is emulate the vocals you hear in life and the added bass character from room response.............all in one frequency curve. Also it’s safe to say a number of manufacturers have used this data to make Headphones and IEMs.



http://seanolive.blogspot.com/2013/04/the-relationship-between-perception-and.html


Harmon thought that it would be nice to suggest a curve. In the past others had a curve but every curve was all over the place. So they suggested a curve. It doesn’t mean it’s perfect and it doesn’t take in to account many personal factors that make you an independently individual listener. Everyone has a slightly different ear canal. Everyone has maybe a slightly different preference.

So good IEMs have an even/complete and correct frequency response. Though within that response there is still a lot of freedom to make the sound be darker, or treble-centric or mid-centric. Many people don’t find the Harmon to be ideal, so they tweak it slightly. Why is a great question........in a way it doesn’t matter why, but they are finding their target response curve outside of the Harmon suggestion.

Also don’t forget the target curve is only part of the equation in making IEMs sound good. Still.........it is safe to say 80% of why a person likes an IEM is the FR.
 
Aug 10, 2021 at 9:48 AM Post #9 of 15

someguyontheinternet

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The answer would be: maybe

The Harman target is based on preference. According to Sean Olive the harman target fits to a preference loudspeaker target (10 db downward slope from 20 to 20k Hz).

If the speakers used in mixing and mastering fit that preference curve, a headphone following the harman target may approximate the same sound. There are some more complicated considerations to make regarding preference and loudspeaker vs headphone differences though.
 
Aug 10, 2021 at 10:20 AM Post #10 of 15

Redcarmoose

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The answer would be: maybe

The Harman target is based on preference. According to Sean Olive the harman target fits to a preference loudspeaker target (10 db downward slope from 20 to 20k Hz).

If the speakers used in mixing and mastering fit that preference curve, a headphone following the harman target may approximate the same sound. There are some more complicated considerations to make regarding preference and loudspeaker vs headphone differences though.
Right there is no standardized recording. So all we can do is hope to have the mixing and mastering fit that curve.
 
Aug 10, 2021 at 9:33 PM Post #11 of 15

Wasaabi

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“A frequency response balance many prefer.” That’s all it is right there!


That’s all it is...... nothing more nothing less, except it’s based on IEMs sounding like the frequency response-tone of speakers in a room. All Harman is trying to do is emulate the vocals you hear in life and the added bass character from room response.............all in one frequency curve. Also it’s safe to say a number of manufacturers have used this data to make Headphones and IEMs.



http://seanolive.blogspot.com/2013/04/the-relationship-between-perception-and.html


Harmon thought that it would be nice to suggest a curve. In the past others had a curve but every curve was all over the place. So they suggested a curve. It doesn’t mean it’s perfect and it doesn’t take in to account many personal factors that make you an independently individual listener. Everyone has a slightly different ear canal. Everyone has maybe a slightly different preference.

So good IEMs have an even/complete and correct frequency response. Though within that response there is still a lot of freedom to make the sound be darker, or treble-centric or mid-centric. Many people don’t find the Harmon to be ideal, so they tweak it slightly. Why is a great question........in a way it doesn’t matter why, but they are finding their target response curve outside of the Harmon suggestion.

Also don’t forget the target curve is only part of the equation in making IEMs sound good. Still.........it is safe to say 80% of why a person likes an IEM is the FR.
Thanks bro! Your analysis is very clear. :beerchug:
 
Aug 10, 2021 at 9:39 PM Post #12 of 15

Wasaabi

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The answer would be: maybe

The Harman target is based on preference. According to Sean Olive the harman target fits to a preference loudspeaker target (10 db downward slope from 20 to 20k Hz).

If the speakers used in mixing and mastering fit that preference curve, a headphone following the harman target may approximate the same sound. There are some more complicated considerations to make regarding preference and loudspeaker vs headphone differences though.
I got it. Thank you!:)
 
Dec 18, 2021 at 9:24 PM Post #14 of 15

earfonia

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IMHO: Yes, but not exactly.
Seems I'm a bit late, thread started in August 2021.
Most of my favorite IEMs that sound more or less 'neutralish' to my ears are pretty close to HT IE 2019.
But when I measured them there is always disagreement on the treble area between 5kHz to 10kHz.
HT seems to ignore and smoothed out the treble region. Meaning the treble target is more like estimated perceived treble level, and not a real target for measurement as measurement using the standard IEC 60318-4 coupler (711 coupler) will almost always have a dip around the 7kHz area and then resonance peak at around 8kHz - 9kHz due to λ/2 distance between the IEM and IEC coupler mic membrane. This resonance peak has been reduced on GRAS Hi-Res couplers, but it is naturally there on measurement results.

So what I'm trying to say is, for the treble area, Harman Target may not be a realistic target for IEM measurement. but for the bass and mids area it is an 'OK' target. Bass is personal preference, so there won't be any one consensus on how much bass level should be for a target.
 
Dec 18, 2021 at 9:28 PM Post #15 of 15

dimazbaik

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As myself enjoy analytical sound as one of preference, balance Harman is good
 

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