cans for toddlers
Jul 4, 2012 at 11:49 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 11

talisman42

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First off, daughter looks damn cute wearing cans :)   At the church we go to, the speakers can get very loud. Sometimes, I have to cup my hands over her hears. Sometimes her older friends do the same for her and hold her ears. I've looked around for toddler sized phones, but not sure if I'm looking for the right product. They must
 
1. dampen loud/harsh sound - yet allow ambient sound/voices to come there.
2. fit comfortably
3. semi or open cans
4. removable cables
 
so they can be used for specific purposes - plugged into an entertain system - or no plug for ear safety applications.  There are quite a few out there, but have had no experience with any one of them. I'm even wondering if there are any higher quality ones that have detachable cables that can help protect my baby's ears at church! lol sounds funny. So I guess they can regular phones that will fit smaller beetlejuice heads (baby).  Thanks for your suggestions~
 
 
 
 
 

 
Jul 5, 2012 at 12:08 AM Post #2 of 11

mac336

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does your church look like this?
 

 
 
on a more serious note, you should just sit farther away from the speakers in your church, or just get her earplugs. 
 
your can pick up some earplugs or those some of those noise reducing earmuffs
 
http://www.amazon.com/3M-Peltor-Optime-H10A-Earmuff/dp/B00009LI4K
 
as for wanting to protect your child's hearing, headphones are one of the worst things you could give her.  children don't know how to take care of their ears and listen at safe levels.  Also, headphones wont be good for her ears in general--keeping a sound source so close to her ears for extended periods of time even at low volumes will not be good for her young, developing ears.  
 
  why does she have to have headphones anyway?   If you have to get her some, Open back headphones are generally easier on the ears
 
Jul 5, 2012 at 12:17 AM Post #3 of 11

soundstige

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Just get her a set of the cheapest earplugs you can find, and insert them loosely. They'll block out about 10dB of sound and still allow people to closely talk to her easily. Headphones would be a waste of money and dangerous.
 
 
Jul 5, 2012 at 12:21 AM Post #4 of 11

talisman42

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Quote:
does your church look like this?
 

 
 
on a more serious note, you should just sit farther away from the speakers in your church, or just get her earplugs. 
 
your can pick up some earplugs or those some of those noise reducing earmuffs
 
http://www.amazon.com/3M-Peltor-Optime-H10A-Earmuff/dp/B00009LI4K
 
as for wanting to protect your child's hearing, headphones are one of the worst things you could give her.  children don't know how to take care of their ears and listen at safe levels.  Also, headphones wont be good for her ears in general--keeping a sound source so close to her ears for extended periods of time even at low volumes will not be good for her young, developing ears.  
 
  why does she have to have headphones anyway?   If you have to get her some, Open back headphones are generally easier on the ears

 
Well, the chuch looks a bit different as is a full band on the stage drummer, eguitar, bass, keyboards.. and some of these performers have pipes that can put steve tyler to shame lol. Needless to say, it simply gets too loud in there when singing praises. Yes - I was thinking open back. Traditional earplugs would be idea, but there's no way she'll keep them seated properly. Regular cans seem to be more manageable.
 
The 3m ear muffs are a good suggestion, but they seem to be strictly as utility. For our case, I was hoping we can get her some comfortable cans she can even use at home while having the accessory available during our weekly outings.  Yes - open back would be idea.
 
Jul 5, 2012 at 1:25 AM Post #5 of 11

smcginni

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My little girl (now almost 3) has been wearing these since about 18 mo and really likes them. Even wore them tonight to watch fireworks. She has very sensitive ears. Even with them on, though, we can talk to her normally and she doesn't try to yell back. A great value and highly recommended!

http://www.amazon.com/Peltor-97070-Junior-Earmuff-Black/dp/B000I7NX5E/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1341465728&sr=8-2&keywords=PEltor+youth+ear+protection

They are adjustable and will probably fit her for a couple more years. They don't stick out too far and are reasonably compact for their purpose.
 
Jul 5, 2012 at 1:39 AM Post #6 of 11

mac336

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as for protecting her ears while listening to music, open back is the way to go, although I personally would not let my toddler listen to any type of headphone, earbud, etc.
 
should pick up a cheap pair of noise reducing earmuffs for her ears for church.  she will still be able to hear your voice through them
 
 
Jul 5, 2012 at 1:57 AM Post #7 of 11

obobskivich

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Either earmuffs, or if she's able (or if you can help her), something like Etyplugs (which are designed for exactly what you're describing - afaik the E4 will do the same thing with the cables detached, but call me a little...shy...about handing a young child a $300 pair of IEMs and saying "go wild"). Moving further away probably won't help very much (the attenuation over distance is fairly minimal, you lose 3 dB per double, so if it's 100 dB @ 1 meter, @ 2 meters its 97 dB, @ 4 it's 94, @ 8 its 91, @ 16 its 89 (we're at 52' ft and still not within OSHA guidelines! we're also probably out in the parking lot too)), and it may make it worse depending on the acoustics of the room (you might get a nice backwave).

My suggestions, in order:

- Complain to the sound "techs" that it's running too hot. I don't care what their excuse is; this is not a KISS show, it's a family event, 80 dB should be your top-end (and despite this, most of those guys will try to shame a Deep Purple sound check).
- Get the kiddo a pair of muffs or earplugs (I don't like cheap earplugs because most of them suck and don't seal well (they're also usually uncomfortable); Etyplugs are not that much more money).
- Find somewhere else to go with the kiddo (do they have a "cry room" where you can watch the service via TV or through a window, and be isolated from the noise; for example) - I don't mean "find a new church" btw.


If you're a really over-protective type (more power to you!), get these:
http://www.amazon.com/Howard-Leight-R-03318-Leightning-Shooters/dp/B001DZX86O/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1341467576&sr=8-1&keywords=leightning+l3

Highest NRR of any commercially available earmuff. It really doesn't get more robust.

As far as kiddos with headphones, there's a few options to start them off with from Etyomtic and Kidzgear that I would consider - they all have internal limiters to prevent your kiddo from blowing their ears up. I wouldn't consider any of them for a very young child though (like a toddler) or for this application. I'd say stick to multiple devices at this age, both because it'll make it easier for the kid to associate with, and because it'll be easier for you to deal with.


Etyplugs:
http://www.amazon.com/Etymotic-Research-Protection-Earplugs-Standard/dp/B0044DEESS/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1341467798&sr=8-2&keywords=etyplug
Etykids:
http://www.amazon.com/Etymotic-Research-EREK-5-BLACK-Safe-Listening-Headset-/dp/B005TOV0OM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1341467827&sr=8-1&keywords=etykid
 
Jul 5, 2012 at 7:40 PM Post #8 of 11

talisman42

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Quote:
Either earmuffs, or if she's able (or if you can help her), something like Etyplugs (which are designed for exactly what you're describing - afaik the E4 will do the same thing with the cables detached, but call me a little...shy...about handing a young child a $300 pair of IEMs and saying "go wild"). Moving further away probably won't help very much (the attenuation over distance is fairly minimal, you lose 3 dB per double, so if it's 100 dB @ 1 meter, @ 2 meters its 97 dB, @ 4 it's 94, @ 8 its 91, @ 16 its 89 (we're at 52' ft and still not within OSHA guidelines! we're also probably out in the parking lot too)), and it may make it worse depending on the acoustics of the room (you might get a nice backwave).
 

 
Actually, they have speakers installed on the ceiling.. so every 10 rows gets a full blast :frowning2:   It does get very loud. Totally appreciate the recommendations. I am surprised to see the ety kids product!
 
Jul 5, 2012 at 7:50 PM Post #10 of 11

obobskivich

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Actually, they have speakers installed on the ceiling.. so every 10 rows gets a full blast :frowning2:   It does get very loud. Totally appreciate the recommendations. I am surprised to see the ety kids product!


See, and the reason you install speakers like that is so you can lower the overall volume level at the mains and not smash your front row. At least that's the "ideal" way to do it. It kind of annoys me to hear about this kind of thing; but that aside, glad I could be of some help.
 
Jul 5, 2012 at 11:17 PM Post #11 of 11
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You could try the V-MODA Faders. They are in-ear but reduce the volume by set amounts, allowing through vocals clearly though. I use them when flying and want to sleep but easily be awoken for meals etc.
 

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