General Information

Hiby's first Dongle DAC, featuring an ES9281PRO Chip, supports MQA, HiBy Music app, HiRes certified, 70mW high power / low battery consumption, RGB indicator light, DSD128, 3.5mm headphone jack, USB-C port, all metal body, leather case

Latest reviews

Darkkiso

New Head-Fier
Pros: Mid-bass is very tight with being prominent in the track.
High extensions are very good.
Sub-bass has a very good extension.
Vocals are very expressive and forward in the track.
Violin and piano tracks have attacked without being too bright.
Instrument separation is very good and very prominent in the track.
Sparkle and airy highs without having any kind of sibilance.
Silent background noise like the hiss is not prominent.
Great for reference kind of listening or production.
Native DSD 128 support.
MQA playback
Budget-friendly DAC with massive sound output.
RGB light indicator for sound formats that are being played.
Lows decay are very good.
Cons: Natural highs extension might be boring for some.

The volume level is a bit confusing.

Instrument separation needs a bit of layering.

Soundstage needs more space.

Sub-bass can be flat in certain tracks.

Bass roll-off at early seconds of the prominent track.

Vocals sound a bit artificial.

Bass decay is very short.

can be flat sounding depending on the track.

Musical notes are a bit delayed.
HIBY FC3: USB DAC with RGB
Opening:
Are you a gamer? who wants RGB and at the same time who is an audiophile, who wants sound quality in their gaming peripherals. well, you are in luck we have here The HIBY-FC3, a USB DAC with RGB kidding aside this USB DAC blew me away on its performance and sound output, so without ado let's start.
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USB DAC INFORMATION
Dimensions 45*13*9 mm
Weight 9.1g
DAC chip ES9281PRO
Hardware buttons Volume +/-
DSD support Up to DSD128 (DoP)
Indicator light RGB LED status indicator
USB port Type-C
Headphone port Standard 3.5mm headphone port for headphones and CTIA-standard headsets, does not support line control
Microphone Support (Available in non-exclusive mode)
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My subjective impressions
Pros:
✅

Mid-bass is very tight with being prominent in the track.
High extensions are very good.
Sub-bass has a very good extension.
Vocals are very expressive and forward in the track.
Violin and piano tracks have attacked without being too bright.
Instrument separation is very good and very prominent in the track.
Sparkle and airy highs without having any kind of sibilance.
Silent background noise like the hiss is not prominent.
Great for reference kind of listening or production.
Native DSD 128 support.
MQA playback
Budget-friendly DAC with massive sound output.
RGB light indicator for sound formats that are being played.
Lows decay are very good.
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Cons:
❌

Natural highs extension might be boring for some.
The volume level is a bit confusing.
Instrument separation needs a bit of layering.
Soundstage needs more space.
Sub-bass can be flat in certain tracks.
Bass roll-off at early seconds of the prominent track.
Vocals sound a bit artificial.
Bass decay is very short.
can be flat sounding depending on the track.
Musical notes are a bit delayed.
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Final remarks
Honestly, this USB DAC is a bang for the buck because of its sound output, and for a budget, you can decode MQA files and this USB DAC has a place for my liking.
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Disclaimer
I would like to thank sir Loo Levi for letting me experience his unit of this USB DAC.
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My Personal Sound preference:
🎧

As a former musician, I want the instruments to be very clean and precise in general terms, I am a mid-centric guy with being forwarded in the track without being too bright and too boomy or bloated.
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My audio gears and sources.
BQEYZ KC2
MOONDROP ARIA
CCA NRA
TRN ST1
HIFIMAN-RE400
YUIN-PK2
OPPO A95
OPPO A95 3.5mm headphone jack
UAPP(USB AUDIO PLAYER PRO)
Abigail by not VE
Es-pro
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My sound library
Pop
Queen, rick Astley, chain-smokers, Josh Turner, CharliePuth, Billie Eilish, Drake, Magic!, The white stripes,
Jpop and anime music
Ayasa, D4DJ, Bangdream , GARNiDELiA, Vocaloid, the piggies, Yoasobi, Silent siren, ReoNa, Fripside, Sumire Uesaka, Sora Amamiya, every
❤
ing! , Lisa, Nana Mizuki, Mori Calliope, Gawr Gura, Hoshimachi Suisei, Fubuki shirakani, Amalee, Minami, and a lot more.
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Last edited:
Darkkiso
Sophie 101
Sophie 101
Can I use this attached to my iPhone and listen to radio from apps like "TuneIn" and BBC Sounds?

crea1986

New Head-Fier
Insane value for such small,powerful and cheap device. 5 stars from me
Pros: -Very balanced airy and detailed sound
-Quite Powerful for such a small and compact device
-MQA decoding
-Physical volume control
-Very sturdy (it's all metal)
-premium feeling to the touch
-Punch well above it's price
-Nice packaging and presentation
Cons: None i can think of,maybe the rgb might bother someone
PXL_20211214_142320480.PORTRAIT.jpg

darmanastartes

500+ Head-Fier
Fuel Efficient
Pros: relatively powerful and efficient in terms of power consumption, compact, good build quality, hardware volume and playback controls
Cons: still uses more power than Apple dongle
DSC08259~2.jpg

The Hiby FC3 is a compact digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and amplifier combination unit which connects to the transport device via USB-C. The Hiby FC3 was provided to me for review by HiFiGo, where it is available for purchase starting at $69.

PACKAGING AND ACCESSORIES:
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The Hiby FC3 comes in a square black box with few exterior markings beyond Hiby’s corporate contact information. In its base configuration, the FC3 includes a 9" USB-A to USB-C cable, a 5" USB-C to USB-C cable, and a Hiby-branded protective leather wrap for the FC3. The USB cables both have Hiby branding. The wrap has a cutout for the FC3’s sample rate indicator light and embossed +/- indicators for the volume controls. The stitching and material quality of this wrap are rudimentary and I do not feel it matches the aesthetics of the device or cables well. The package also contains a warranty card, a quality control pass chit, an instruction manual in English and Mandarin Chinese. HiFiGo included a USB-C to Lightning adapter with my review unit, which appears to be a $19 add-on to the FC3. This adapter is much nicer-looking than the base cables, with anodized grey metal hardware and a braided silver-plated interconnect.

AESTHETICS AND BUILD QUALITY:
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The Hiby FC3 is compact, sleek, and attractive. There is a circular sample rate indicator light on the front face of the FC3. There are combined hardware volume and playback controls on the side of the device. “HIBY FC3” is printed in reflective text inside an anodized inlay on the back of the device. This inlay is a slightly darker shade of grey than the rest of the brushed aluminum housing. There is a faint seam between the two halves of the housing shell. The 3.5mm jack and female USB-C port fit their respective connectors snugly.

POWER DELIVERY:
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The Hiby FC3 is powerful enough for just about any in-ear monitor. With the FC3’s hardware volume maxed out, I reach my typical listening volume with my phone’s system volume set to 60–65% with the hardish-to-drive Moondrop S8. On Windows, I reach the same volume at a system volume setting of 40/100. The FC3’s hardware volume controls work independently of the transport volume controls on both Android and Windows. Long-pressing the volume-down key skips to the next track, while long-pressing the volume-up key rewinds to the previous track. Interestingly, the FC3’s long-press hardware playback controls work even if the FC3 is not selected as the current sound device in Windows.

POWER CONSUMPTION AND HEAT MANAGEMENT:
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The following power consumption measurements were taken while the Hiby FC3 was in use:
Hiby FC3 Android.jpg

^Android
Hiby FC3 PC 44.1-16.jpg

^PC

The Hiby FC3’s power consumption compares very favorably to the larger but similarly laid out xDuoo Link, and comes in just under the Meizu HiFi Pro:
xDuoo Link.png

^xDuoo Link
Meizu Pro.png

^Meizu HiFi Pro
The power draw is higher than that of the gold standard for USB-C audio devices, the Apple dongle:
Apple Dongle.png

The Hiby FC3 does have a standby mode that kicks in when the device is plugged in without a connected headphone:

Hiby FC3 Android Standby.jpg

^Android
Hiby FC3 PC Standby.jpg

^PC

In short, if you feel comfortable with the Meizu HiFi Pro’s battery consumption, you will also be comfortable with the FC3’s.
The Hiby FC3 has excellent heat management and can be left connected to a powered transport device for days on end without having to worry about it overheating.

SOUND:
Hiby FC3.jpg

I have no complaints when it comes to the sound quality of the Hiby FC3. In a volume-matched(.2 dB), sighted, non-instantaneous switching comparison of the FC3 and the E1DA 9038D, I was hard-pressed to distinguish one from the other in terms of sound.

A Note on Hiby Blue:
I did install the Hiby Blue app on my phone to see if it offered any additional functionality with the Hiby FC3. Although Hiby Blue does add limited equalization options with the Hidizs H2 Bluetooth receiver (review forthcoming), it does not add any options for use with the FC3. With the FC3, I recommend sticking to Wavelet if you need equalization.

CLOSING WORDS:
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While not as powerful as some of the other USB-C dongles I have reviewed recently, the Hiby FC3 offers much better power efficiency than these higher output options. With the Meizu HiFi Pro hard to find these days, I am happy to recommend the Hiby FC3 in its place if you need more output than the Apple dongle is capable of on stock Android.
The Hiby FC3 can be purchased below:
Hiby FC3 Portable MQA USB DAC Headphone Amplifier — HiFiGo
searchingtom
searchingtom
I still don't know how I feel about the ESS DAC chips. I know I love the AKM 4499. Hard for me to compare.

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