What book are you reading right now?
Apr 28, 2015 at 1:31 AM Post #3,961 of 5,340


One of the benefits of being bilingual in Canada is being able to read a French classic in it's original language.  There's always something lost in a translation.  I'm grateful to have learned both languages. 
 
Apr 28, 2015 at 2:23 AM Post #3,962 of 5,340
A great story about a familiy father and the dreams of breaking free from the daily stress of life. 
 

 
Apr 28, 2015 at 7:13 AM Post #3,963 of 5,340
Apr 29, 2015 at 10:44 PM Post #3,964 of 5,340
I'm about to start Cloud Atlas. 
 
Actually, here's a question to ask... I'm reading this book for school, for a report where I compare the book and the movie. It was down to this or Johnny Got His Gun. but I went with Cloud Atlas, relegating the latter to a personal project (I like books.). I know the changes the movie made, and that they will probably make for an inferior version of the story. Should I make a last minute switch, or stick with my current book? 
 
Apr 29, 2015 at 11:13 PM Post #3,965 of 5,340
  I'm about to start Cloud Atlas. 
 
Actually, here's a question to ask... I'm reading this book for school, for a report where I compare the book and the movie. It was down to this or Johnny Got His Gun. but I went with Cloud Atlas, relegating the latter to a personal project (I like books.). I know the changes the movie made, and that they will probably make for an inferior version of the story. Should I make a last minute switch, or stick with my current book? 


Good question.
 
Here's my take on it. I'd go with Cloud Atlas as it is a Novel that went through a lot of adaptation in order to be filmed. It's a fascinating change.
Johnny Got His Gun (you don't mention which filmed version it is so I will assume the original). was written entirely by Dalton Trumbo who largely was a screenwriter more than a novelist. Comparing the book to the movie which he also directed is a little bit of a one sided exercise and is more about Trumbo the man then the differences and changes that need to be adapted into a film from a novel.
 
Just my opinion.
 
Apr 30, 2015 at 6:21 AM Post #3,968 of 5,340
 
 
 
 
This time I'm gonna finish it!

I read this too and it was my first Murakami book. I never really got that excited about it. I am going to start "What I talk about when I talk about running" because I am training for a trail marathon next month. But after that I think I will pick another Murakami book and it will probably be "Dance Dance Dance" and then "Norwegian Wood".
 

 
Apr 30, 2015 at 7:30 AM Post #3,969 of 5,340
'Dance Dance Dance' is a sequel (albeit an unconventional one) to 'A Wild Sheep Chase', so that would be a good place to start.
 
As for his other books, I haven't read all of them, but found his breakthrough hit 'Norwegian Wood' not to my taste. The short stories of 'The Elephant vanishes' and the novel 'Hard-boiled Wonderland' also didn't do it for me, although they are at least interesting. This could, of course, be down to the translation.
 
'The Wind-up Bird Chronicles' is a good but long read, which I enjoyed. I also liked 'Kafka on the Shore' a lot.
 
'After Dark' has good atmosphere, but lacks plot and a real conclusion, IMO.
 
Apr 30, 2015 at 7:37 AM Post #3,970 of 5,340
  I'm about to start Cloud Atlas. 
 
Actually, here's a question to ask... I'm reading this book for school, for a report where I compare the book and the movie. It was down to this or Johnny Got His Gun. but I went with Cloud Atlas, relegating the latter to a personal project (I like books.). I know the changes the movie made, and that they will probably make for an inferior version of the story. Should I make a last minute switch, or stick with my current book? 

Here's an article by the author and screenwriter William Boyd about making a film or TV series from a novel: http://www.televisual.com/blog-detail/William-Boyd-on-adapting-Restless-for-BBC-One_bid-412.html
 
You may find some interesting points and insights that you can work into your report. He has written other articles on the subject too, so a bit of Googling may turn up useful material.
 
Apr 30, 2015 at 7:39 AM Post #3,971 of 5,340
  'Dance Dance Dance' is a sequel (albeit an unconventional one) to 'A Wild Sheep Chase', so that would be a good place to start.
 
As for his other books, I haven't read all of them, but found his breakthrough hit 'Norwegian Wood' not to my taste. The short stories of 'The Elephant vanishes' and the novel 'Hard-boiled Wonderland' also didn't do it for me, although they are at least interesting. This could, of course, be down to the translation.
 
'The Wind-up Bird Chronicles' is a good but long read, which I enjoyed. I also liked 'Kafka on the Shore' a lot.
 
'After Dark' has good atmosphere, but lacks plot and a real conclusion, IMO.

I was told that "Kafka on the shore" is a good read. So that one will probably be qued too. 
 
May 2, 2015 at 5:02 AM Post #3,973 of 5,340
  I don't like all of his books, but I liked that one.

So far i really enjoy his writing style. I just need to commit to this book again.
  I read this too and it was my first Murakami book. I never really got that excited about it. I am going to start "What I talk about when I talk about running" because I am training for a trail marathon next month. But after that I think I will pick another Murakami book and it will probably be "Dance Dance Dance" and then "Norwegian Wood".
 

I havent decided which of his other books I will read next so I'm curious how those ones go for you.
 
May 4, 2015 at 7:50 AM Post #3,974 of 5,340
I've read these Murakami books and enjoyed them all: Norwegian Wood, Sputnik Sweetheart, South of the Border, West of the Sun, Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.
 
I've started Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World twice but haven't been captivated. I might give it another try. I have 1Q84 to read as well. If you read Murakami expecting scintillating plot, linear narrative and neatly tied up story strands you'll be disappointed.
 

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