What Are You Listening To Right Now?
Jul 2, 2023 at 2:40 PM Post #125,476 of 135,528
Many good "Four Seasons" recordings out there for sure. Not a big fan of Nigel Kennedy rendition I'm afraid, but both Il Giardino Armonico and (especially) Pinnock are among my favourites.

Need to check that Carmignola. I have one with the Venice Baroque Orchestra recorded in 1999.

A couple ones "out of the box" that you probably already know:

1688321267854.png
Vivaldi used "Spring" first movement in both the opening Sinfonia and the first chorus of this delightful opera.

1688321407474.png
The minimalist recomposed version of Max Richter. You love it or hate it. I love it...
There are two Nigel Kennedy 4 seasons. The earlier traditional the "new" version extremely rhythmical and altered. It won't be everyones cup o tee but its quite beautifully done.
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 2:41 PM Post #125,477 of 135,528
Many good "Four Seasons" recordings out there for sure. Not a big fan of Nigel Kennedy rendition I'm afraid, but both Il Giardino Armonico and (especially) Pinnock are among my favourites.

Need to check that Carmignola. I have one with the Venice Baroque Orchestra recorded in 1999.

A couple ones "out of the box" that you probably already know:

1688321267854.png
Vivaldi used "Spring" first movement in both the opening Sinfonia and the first chorus of this delightful opera.

1688321407474.png
The minimalist recomposed version of Max Richter. You love it or hate it. I love it...
I love richter when I want to sleep
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 2:47 PM Post #125,478 of 135,528
Thank you! No, I didn't, though I went to plenty of gigs, obviously. I was with the Banana Records chain from '75 - '77, and at All Records Service wholesaler in Oakland from '78 - '84. I had friends who worked for BGP, though.
But during those years, I got into most shows with free tickets and sometimes drinks and backstage passes, and in the 70's, no Bay Area venue cared about bringing camera gear into concerts - they were only concerned with tape recorders back then.
By the way, a really good friend of mine named Paul "Catflinger" Goeltz was also a relatively well-known concert photographer in the area who you may have bumped into. He was also known in the Dead Head community as the Oatmeal Chocolate-Chip Raisin Banana Cookie man...
 
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Jul 2, 2023 at 2:58 PM Post #125,479 of 135,528
By the way, a really good friend of mine named Paul "Catflinger" Goeltz was also a relatively well-known concert photographer in the area who you may have bumped into. He was also known in the Dead Head community at the Oatmeal Chocolate-Chip Raisin Banana Cookie man...
Alas, Paul's name is not one I'm familiar with. I'd like to see his work, though - does he have a website?
I'm not as deep in the Deadhead community as some of my friends, so his identity as the Cookie Man remains unknown to me as well, but I will check with some other friends who will doubtless have come across him.
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 3:02 PM Post #125,480 of 135,528
Alas, Paul's name is not one I'm familiar with. I'd like to see his work, though - does he have a website?
I'm not as deep in the Deadhead community as some of my friends, so his identity as the Cookie Man remains unknown to me as well, but I will check with some other friends who will doubtless have come across him.
Here's his FB page, with tons of his concert shots in the photos section: https://www.facebook.com/pgoeltz
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 4:12 PM Post #125,481 of 135,528
You know you might have too much of one artist when...

After leafing through my collection I decided that it has been a while since I listened to the Miles Davis collection, Live at Newport 1955-1975. Well it has been a few years as I don't have this set copied to my laptop (read jukebox). :smile:

I ripped the CD's to my laptop this afternoon. Jazz is the only genre that still gets me to buy CD's and even then, only collections.

Here is the collection that I am talking about:


4 CD's consisting of just about 5 hours of music. That will be my Monday!

Referring back to my first sentence, my Miles collection, with all his groups, is 317 pieces of music which works out to 39 hours of awesome. :L3000:
 
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Jul 2, 2023 at 6:40 PM Post #125,483 of 135,528
My take.
Rush evolved and grew up with the times, just like all of us. They were my mentor growing up listening and living by Neal’s lyrics. And their music? Wth? I found the ultimate band for me. If you liked or loved Rush, you were in my circle and a good friend.
Didn’t have a strong family life, a lot to do with me being a pot smoking, coke snorting metal head, rock and roll musician who only thought about me. That was late 70’s. early 80’s. I quit playing music and drugs mid 80’s and fulfilled my need with my ears. I grew up. When you do. You hear music in a different way. To me at least. That’s where Rush really influences me. And that was after Moving Pictures. Every album is excellent especially keeping in mind how they were stretching their songwriting abilities, to match the times, while staying true to their base. The only releases I’m not crazy about is Hold your fire and snakes and arrows. Otherwise everything is great.
Anyone who liked Rush up to moving pictures, give their stuff released after a listen. You will be surprised.

I can say that as I matured I have listened less and less to Rush's 70's output. I had always loved their 80's material (by age 17 I had all of their cds up to the time, Counterparts being brand new), and by age 17 - 19 I was listening to the '80 - '91 albums a lot more than earlier ones. This "era preference" has not changed since.

I haven't always liked their later albums as much as their earlier ones (Counterparts and Test For Echo are, besides the original album--which I don't really even consider Rush since there is no Neil--my least favorite albums despite the fact that they have some of their best tracks), but I could always tell that they had developed as song writers/performers (including Geddy's vocal performance). The overall music direction may not resonate with me as much (partly due to me just not liking post early to mid 90's rock as much as earlier eras), but I was always impressed with their ability to adapt, advance, and grow...and take risks (no trying to recreate endless new versions of Moving Pictures for decades since that is the formula that was most popular/sold the best: that's for boring bands with less integrity...and less musical ability). On each subsequent album new musical heights were achieved, and best of all they were always interesting (they were constantly experimenting) and at least worthwhile/good even if, again, I may not have liked them as much as their earlier material.

Ftr I like Vapor Trails and Snakes and Arrows (much more than Counterparts/Test For Echo), but recognize them as flawed, and I think Clockwork Angels may be their best/most accomplished work ever. I figured when it came out it was their swan song, and I was more than ok with that as what a hell of a high note to go out on! It's a culmination of everything they developed and learned throughout their whole career, perfected as much as possible, packed into one epic album. Simply magisterial.

I read years ago in an interview Geddy said he was embarrassed about some of their early material, didn't find out which albums he meant though.

He's said that many times; even that they weren't very good when they first started/on their first few albums. There was a request list posted on the internet for songs to be played at later (post 2002) Rush shows the band knew about and did consider/pick from, but Geddy did say that some songs were simply a no-go. Uncharacteristically, iirc, he once said (paraphrased from memory) something like "I don't care how many fans want us to play that song, I won't perform it". He was simply embarrassed by many of their earlier songs (and I think Alex/Neil were too) and felt strongly that they were simply not worth the effort of relearning/tweaking to play live at that point in their career.


Faves:

The one that started all the now 30+ years of of madness for me; came out in the Fall of my freshman year of high school (and it was actually quite popular at my school even given the great grunge/alt albums of the time for competition) and I've been hooked since!

RtB.jpg

2011 Audio Fidelity Gold Disc Remaster with a DR of 16!


I knew I was getting old in my early 30's when I first listened to this "parent rock" album in full, recognized many songs from it from growing up hearing them on my parent's local soft rock station on their stereo, and...liked it. And then it quickly became a favorite album.

TIV.jpg

2012 vinyl ripped to FLAC


The first of a 5 album run of some of my favorite Maiden albums.

IMTNOTB.jpg
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 6:46 PM Post #125,484 of 135,528
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 6:56 PM Post #125,485 of 135,528


After listening to the Rick Beato Pat Metheny interview, I am rediscovering recordings by this master musician...
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 7:11 PM Post #125,486 of 135,528
I can say that as I matured I have listened less and less to Rush's 70's output. I had always loved their 80's material (by age 17 I had all of their cds up to the time, Counterparts being brand new), and by age 17 - 19 I was listening to the '80 - '91 albums a lot more than earlier ones. This "era preference" has not changed since.

I haven't always liked their later albums as much as their earlier ones (Counterparts and Test For Echo are, besides the original album--which I don't really even consider Rush since there is no Neil--my least favorite albums despite the fact that they have some of their best tracks), but I could always tell that they had developed as song writers/performers (including Geddy's vocal performance). The overall music direction may not resonate with me as much (partly due to me just not liking post early to mid 90's rock as much as earlier eras), but I was always impressed with their ability to adapt, advance, and grow...and take risks (no trying to recreate endless new versions of Moving Pictures for decades since that is the formula that was most popular/sold the best: that's for boring bands with less integrity...and less musical ability). On each subsequent album new musical heights were achieved, and best of all they were always interesting (they were constantly experimenting) and at least worthwhile/good even if, again, I may not have liked them as much as their earlier material.

Ftr I like Vapor Trails and Snakes and Arrows (much more than Counterparts/Test For Echo), but recognize them as flawed, and I think Clockwork Angels may be their best/most accomplished work ever. I figured when it came out it was their swan song, and I was more than ok with that as what a hell of a high note to go out on! It's a culmination of everything they developed and learned throughout their whole career, perfected as much as possible, packed into one epic album. Simply magisterial.



He's said that many times; even that they weren't very good when they first started/on their first few albums. There was a request list posted on the internet for songs to be played at later (post 2002) Rush shows the band knew about and did consider/pick from, but Geddy did say that some songs were simply a no-go. Uncharacteristically, iirc, he once said (paraphrased from memory) something like "I don't care how many fans want us to play that song, I won't perform it". He was simply embarrassed by many of their earlier songs (and I think Alex/Neil were too) and felt strongly that they were simply not worth the effort of relearning/tweaking to play live at that point in their career.


Faves:

The one that started all the now 30+ years of of madness for me; came out in the Fall of my freshman year of high school (and it was actually quite popular at my school even given the great grunge/alt albums of the time for competition) and I've been hooked since!


2011 Audio Fidelity Gold Disc Remaster with a DR of 16!


I knew I was getting old in my early 30's when I first listened to this "parent rock" album in full, recognized many songs from it from growing up hearing them on my parent's local soft rock station on their stereo, and...liked it. And then it quickly became a favorite album.


2012 vinyl ripped to FLAC


The first of a 5 album run of some of my favorite Maiden albums.

Toto is a great band that had a lot of mainstream success. They did have their radio hits, but damn, they are really good musicians with great writing abilities. Their best tracks are everything you've never heard on the radio before. It's because they get all muscian-ie. I have one of their live concerts on Blu-ray and it's simply outstanding. Iron maiden? A staple growing up. Good choices and nice taste for me at least.
Lastly: Obviously, I was a kid, a young man, an aging and maturing man and now a retired man. I don't care how old I am now, but there was a certain type of music that resonated with me and grabbed me by the throat. Once I was under this kind of music's spell (with a lot of good herb too) with these bands in the 70's and 80's, it was over to the day I pass. Rush, Zepplin, Floyd, Sabbath, Zappa, Nugent, Queen, Maiden, Genisis, Yes, ELP, Gentle Giant, etc. Once you get pulled into this sound and style?.........you're done for life.
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 7:26 PM Post #125,487 of 135,528
He's said that many times; even that they weren't very good when they first started/on their first few albums. There was a request list posted on the internet for songs to be played at later (post 2002) Rush shows the band knew about and did consider/pick from, but Geddy did say that some songs were simply a no-go. Uncharacteristically, iirc, he once said (paraphrased from memory) something like "I don't care how many fans want us to play that song, I won't perform it". He was simply embarrassed by many of their earlier songs (and I think Alex/Neil were too) and felt strongly that they were simply not worth the effort of relearning/tweaking to play live at that point in their career.

I listened to Rush a fair bit when I was a teen and thought some albums were quite good, some ok, they've never been one of my favourites, though because I got into them at an early age I'll always be fond of them. I discovered Rush after someone at school saw an album cover and said I should listen to it because I liked heavy music. But when I played it I was disappointed, the musicianship was very good but it was just too light for me, I was surprised it was even classed as metal (which many considered it then and I found it a bit theatrical tbo) - I was used to Judas Priest, Motorhead, Rainbow, Van Halen etc. I really like the second half of Caress of Steel, but the first three songs to me are filler, how can you put - 'I think I'm going bald' on the same album as The Fountain of Lamneth? it just spoils the flow of the album imo. So I think the period I know (upto the early eighties) is a bit hit and miss which even Geddy agrees with. Signals is probably my favourite album I've listened to because the songs sound like they belong together. I'm going to see if I can get into Clockwork Angels.

Scheming demons
Dressed in kingly guise
Beating down the multitude
And scoffing at the wise

 
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Jul 2, 2023 at 7:58 PM Post #125,488 of 135,528
Toto is a great band that had a lot of mainstream success. They did have their radio hits, but damn, they are really good musicians with great writing abilities. Their best tracks are everything you've never heard on the radio before. It's because they get all muscian-ie. I have one of their live concerts on Blu-ray and it's simply outstanding. Iron maiden? A staple growing up. Good choices and nice taste for me at least.
Lastly: Obviously, I was a kid, a young man, an aging and maturing man and now a retired man. I don't care how old I am now, but there was a certain type of music that resonated with me and grabbed me by the throat. Once I was under this kind of music's spell (with a lot of good herb too) with these bands in the 70's and 80's, it was over to the day I pass. Rush, Zepplin, Floyd, Sabbath, Zappa, Nugent, Queen, Maiden, Genisis, Yes, ELP, Gentle Giant, etc. Once you get pulled into this sound and style?.........you're done for life.
Yeah, I know what you mean. I'll be 72 in September; no idea how I've lasted this long, but that was my music back in the 70's, too, and I still enjoy a lot of that. But when punk came around in 1976, I dove into that big time, but I had plenty of room for The Sex Pistols along with Genesis, and then as that developed into post-punk, more contemporary prog, and such, so much the better for me. Lost interest in them for about 10 years, but got back into the Grateful Dead around '86, too - used to be a big Head in the early 70's. And Toto's 'Africa' is an awesome song.
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 8:19 PM Post #125,489 of 135,528
There are two Nigel Kennedy 4 seasons. The earlier traditional the "new" version extremely rhythmical and altered. It won't be everyones cup o tee but its quite beautifully done.
Thanks for pointing that out. Didn't know he recorded two versions.
 
Jul 2, 2023 at 8:39 PM Post #125,490 of 135,528
Fantastic compilation for back-to-work Monday morning...
 

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