Manic Depression... folk who suffer from it...
Aug 2, 2008 at 12:15 AM Post #61 of 69

Akabeth

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I know a guy who was bipolar in my Calc class on my first semester last year. He's in my team-homework group.

Visually, I think he had his issues on tougher problems. For some odd reason, everytime we came into one he got pissed at himself and told us to leave him alone. Most of the time he ended up solving it alone! He spouted some grammatical mishaps in the library at times.

Fortunately for him, our team had 2 ladies, and one was
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and he actually said he had his problems when we all gathered for the first time. He is a 'very good' in math. It was an interesting experience. A lot of people in my class liked him, very cheerful man too
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Aug 2, 2008 at 12:24 AM Post #62 of 69

aaron313

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Quote:

Originally Posted by philodox /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Sorry, are you saying that medication is imperative for bipolar, unipolar and/or depression?


Immediately imperative for bipolar and crippling depression. Not sure exactly where to draw the line between major depression and mild depression that allows the person to still function. For example, I used to only suffer with SAD, the effects of which did not cripple me, just dulled me. I am not sure medicine would have been the best choice, because of the side effects. Of course, this is just applicable to me, since every person really is different in the case of mental disorders. It's actually shocking to me how different people react to the same drug. I once tried Prozac, and was given a much too large dose, which induced panic attacks. I had to be on anti-anxiety medication for weeks for the medicine to get out of my system.

The point I'm trying to get across is that there are situations where medicine should be administered immediately: no delay whatsoever. And then there are situations where other routes can safely be taken, and medicine could be resorted to later. Some people think that those other efforts are reasonable treatments for the extreme cases.
 
Aug 2, 2008 at 12:28 AM Post #63 of 69

aaron313

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Akabeth /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I know a guy who was bipolar in my Calc class on my first semester last year. He's in my team-homework group.

Visually, I think he had his issues on tougher problems. For some odd reason, everytime we came into one he got pissed at himself and told us to leave him alone. Most of the time he ended up solving it alone! He spouted some grammatical mishaps in the library at times.

Fortunately for him, our team had 2 ladies, and one was
biggrin.gif
and he actually said he had his problems when we all gathered for the first time. He is a 'very good' in math. It was an interesting experience. A lot of people in my class liked him, very cheerful man too
smily_headphones1.gif



I'm still undecided on the subject of whether mania actually increased my math skills. I know that it allowed me to study more obsessively, but what about IQ? All I know is that in the Fall I would struggle more with complex material, and in the Spring I'd have no difficulties (Spring of Senior year of HS I had 100% on every test, quiz, and assignment up to the final in Calc). This has caused me extreme problems in college where all the material is extremely complex. Seasonal effective disorder is not fun.

Not that I'm a genius, but in the Spring I regularly have "moments" that are rare in the Fall. I'm worried about how this will influence job performance in the future.
 
Aug 2, 2008 at 12:33 AM Post #64 of 69

philodox

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While I would agree that medication is almost certainly imperative to pull someone out of a manic or depressive break, constant medication is not always necessary. I don't want to advocate not taking medication, as many people are unable to function without it, but I haven't taken medication myself for nearly 10 years. I've managed to stay healthy through quite a bit of stress, including my recent divorce and move to a new city/job.
 
Aug 2, 2008 at 12:37 AM Post #65 of 69

aaron313

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Quote:

Originally Posted by philodox /img/forum/go_quote.gif
While I would agree that medication is almost certainly imperative to pull someone out of a manic or depressive break, constant medication is not always necessary. I don't want to advocate not taking medication, as many people are unable to function without it, but I haven't taken medication myself for over nearly 10 years. I've managed to stay healthy through quite a bit of stress, including my recent divorce and move to a new city/job.


Very interesting. It is possible that I could function without medication, but I'd be uncomfortable. Since the side effects haven't been bad thus far, I enjoy taking it.

I have a relative who had a psychotic break, and is currently on the maximum dose of lithium. He could never function off medicine.
 
Aug 2, 2008 at 12:39 AM Post #66 of 69

philodox

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Quote:

Originally Posted by aaron313 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I'm still undecided on the subject of whether mania actually increased my math skills. I know that it allowed me to study more obsessively, but what about IQ?


I was without a doubt more intelligent when manic. I normally have a terrible memory, but when manic seem to have an almost encyclopedic knowledge... though obviously limited to my experience. I also found that I thought faster and could think on more 'tracks' than I do naturally. It really sucked at first when I was healthy since it really felt like I was dumb by comparison. Part of that feeling was from the way the drugs muted my emotions and intellect, and is the main reason that I decided to try to deal with my illness without medication. It's worked so far, and though I do miss the 'genius' that I was for a short time, I don't miss the hallucinations or delusions of grandeur. I like to think I've traded some IQ for a little wisdom, and I'm OK with that. Quote:

Originally Posted by aaron313 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Very interesting. It is possible that I could function without medication, but I'd be uncomfortable. Since the side effects haven't been bad thus far, I enjoy taking it.


If you are comfortable and it isn't doing you any harm, then it doesn't make any sense to stop. I just didn't feel myself at all when medicated. Quote:

Originally Posted by aaron313 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I have a relative who had a psychotic break, and is currently on the maximum dose of lithium. He could never function off medicine.


Oh, there are definitely instances where it is necessary. Though, even in those, I think Doctors tend to use meds as an easy way out and other methods could achieve greater progress for the patients.
 
Aug 2, 2008 at 12:44 AM Post #67 of 69

Akabeth

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Quote:

Originally Posted by aaron313 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I'm still undecided on the subject of whether mania actually increased my math skills. I know that it allowed me to study more obsessively, but what about IQ?


I think for you it may be combination of both.

At least you know being bipolar won't stop you on math stuff.
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Aug 2, 2008 at 1:14 AM Post #68 of 69

earwicker7

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Quote:

Originally Posted by catscratch /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I agree that the over-medication of ADD and so-called depression is a serious problem, and is only going to be a more serious problem as long-term effects of these medications start to manifest. Nearly every school shooting involved a shooter on SSRIs of some sort.


I agree about this part to an extent. My strong belief (and that of quite a few therapists I know) is that the majority of SSRI freakouts are people that are bi-polar and improperly treated with SSRI instead of mood stabilizers/anti-psychotics. See my post earlier on this thread for more on this theory.
 
Aug 2, 2008 at 1:30 AM Post #69 of 69

aaron313

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Quote:

Originally Posted by earwicker7 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I agree about this part to an extent. My strong belief (and that of quite a few therapists I know) is that the majority of SSRI freakouts are people that are bi-polar and improperly treated with SSRI instead of mood stabilizers/anti-psychotics. See my post earlier on this thread for more on this theory.


That's me.
 

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