Does the placement of the CDP affect the sound?
Oct 16, 2001 at 4:51 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 41

mcbiff

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My cdp is currently standing right next to my computer monitor with the amp on top of it, there's also a speaker on it (see pic below). My question is: is it possible that this placement affects the sound negatively? I should mention that the computer is always on when I'm listening to music.

Dcp00260.jpg

(This is an old pic, since it was taken the Creek has been replaced by a Sugden Headmaster. Amp still in the same place though.)
 
Oct 16, 2001 at 5:09 PM Post #2 of 41

DarkAngel

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OMG!

Do you realize the vibrations from your speaker are being directly
transferred to CDP housing, not good. First thing is to remove speaker, and stick some vibrapods under CDP, this is bare minimum isolation treatment. ( If you want leaner/more detailed sound you may try cones under CDP) CDP is extremely sensitive to distortion/smearing caused by vibrations both external and internal (motor rotation)

Of course for main system you would have some type of isolation audio rack, and may also use individual isolation devices under certain components. This would require very long response to explain every type available, but if you have any specific questions
please ask.

Also I think close proximity of monitor can only do bad things to CDP, I woud move location of CDP or monitor also.
 
Oct 16, 2001 at 5:29 PM Post #3 of 41

mcbiff

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Thanks for the suggestions, I guess I'll have to look into moving the CDP. I don't know if it matters, but the CDP and speakers are never used at the same time (CDP is for headphones only, speakers connected to computer).
 
Oct 16, 2001 at 5:53 PM Post #4 of 41

Neruda

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Quote:

Originally posted by DarkAngel
...stick some vibrapods under CDP, this is bare minimum isolation treatment. ( If you want leaner/more detailed sound you may try cones under CDP)


I'm like soo not buying that
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Oct 16, 2001 at 6:42 PM Post #6 of 41

dhwilkin

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I pretty much agree w/ DarkAngel, having speakers right on the cdp is asking for some trouble. Ought to be interesting to see how much audible improvement moving them will make. Keep us informed.
 
Oct 16, 2001 at 6:44 PM Post #7 of 41

chych

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Yeah, I don't buy it either Neruda, but hey, its cheap and couldn't hurt... I do have some isolation pads under my CDP though...
 
Oct 16, 2001 at 6:57 PM Post #9 of 41
Quote:

Originally posted by KR...
Jude would have a heart attack if he saw that pic
wink.gif


Just got back from cardiologist after seeing that pic.
wink.gif


Yeah, I'd definitely separate the components more. It doesn't take too much distance to keep the components out of one another's fields. Also, make sure to move them away from that CRT -- monitors and TV's have very high electrical fields immediately in front of them. Also, I just measured a CRT monitor here, and I am seeing almost 20 milligauss of AC magnetic field just to the left of it, as well as some measurable RF fields immediately around the monitor.

Yeah, it'd probably sound noticeably better to move your stuff away from the monitor (doesn't take that much distance -- even a foot would help a lot), as well as keeping components from being right on top of one another.
 
Oct 16, 2001 at 7:34 PM Post #13 of 41

FunkeHomosapien

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Will a TV still emit EMI and RFI if it isn't plugged in?
 
Oct 16, 2001 at 7:52 PM Post #15 of 41

gorgon_123

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Mcbiff - maybe the best solution for you would be to try different setups with the placement of your different components and see if you can actually HEAR a difference in the sound.

I worry that many audiophiles are audio hypochondriacs - meaning they convince themselves certain things effect the sound when really... well.... I'm gonna get flamed so I'll just end this sentence right here
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