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The Ti IEM utilizes pure titanium foil for the diaphragm material. All components inside our IEMs was 100% designed and tooled in-house, resulting a totally unique product. The sonic signature of the Ti IEM is very aggressive, with enhanced bass and

Periodic Audio Titanium (Ti)

Rating:
4.125/5,
  • Specifications
    Frequency Response
    16 Hz to 30 kHz
    Impedance
    32 Ohms nominal
    Sensitivity
    96 dB SPL at 1mW in ear
    Power Handling
    20 mW continuous
    THD
    Less that 1% THD at 1mW
    Material Properties
    Melting Point
    1941 Kelvin
    Speed of Sound
    5090 meters per second
    Young's Modulus
    116 Gigapascals
    Brinell Hardness
    2770 Megapascals

Recent Reviews

  1. SomeTechNoob
    A Solid V-Shaped IEM
    Written by SomeTechNoob
    Published Nov 8, 2018
    4.0/5,
    Pros - Superb Bass
    Accurate Imaging
    Great Sound Stage
    Great Build
    Cons - Questionable Accessories
    Lacking Midrange
    Attached Cable
    First of all, many thanks to Periodic Audio for sending the Be, Ti, and Mg IEMs to demo and give away at the most recent SF South Bay Meet! I did end up taking home the Titaniums as you might have guessed.

    Just a heads up - this is my third review here on Head-Fi and my first one of an IEM at that. As usual, feel free to criticize anything I say, because I'll also tell you exactly how I feel about a product.

    IEMs sit in an awkward spot for me. I've always respected their sound-producing ability, having demoed ones like the Campfire Andromeda and such. The issue is that investing hundreds into a portable audio solution which will inevitably get beat up more than full size cans is daunting. Is the investment worth the risk? Let's find out.

    STN's Periodic Audio Ti Review.

    Unboxing

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    The Periodic Audio Ti comes in a simple, clean, and maybe a little cheap feeling cardboard box.

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    I appreciate the graphs inside, especially the frequency response one. I skimmed over both the graphs and the description when I first demoed the set, but now that I'm reading it I find PA's description quite accurate.

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    Opened up! Not a whole lot to see. I'll note that outer box sleeve isn't resealable. To be honest, the inner cardboard feels like the same stuff that I get from generic Chinese products. At least the packaging is going to be recyclable.

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    Inside the metal container are some eartips, a 3.5mm to 1/4" adapter as well as an airplane adapter. I honestly don't remember the last time I actually used an airplane adapter. The majority of airlines I've taken over the past few years just use a single TRS port now.

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    Here are the accessories unpacked. You get 3 types of ear tips in 3 sizes. Rubber tips in both single and double flange types and some foam tips. The single flange medium rubber tip is pre-installed on the IEM. Foam tips are definitely a nice touch, especially if you've never tried them before. I'll also mention that the included 1/4" adapter is pretty low quality. It produces super tinny sound unless you apply pressure to the 3.5mm plug. So the only good accessories are the eartips, basically.

    Exterior

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    What's really clever are the Left and Right indicators. Perhaps too clever for me since I couldn't figure out left/right until someone at the meet showed me this. The inside mesh is colored, with the standard of red being right and black being left.

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    The build of the buds themselves is mostly plastic and rubber with the end caps being metal. They seem quite sturdy and durable without flashing fancy quality like some other IEMs with CNC'd aluminum. The strain relief is there, but I do wish there was a detachable cable for such a pricey IEM. There's a bass port up top(not pictured) as well.

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    The split is miniscule and hasn't given me any issues. I was surprised to see "periodic audio" on the split since it's so small. The wire is also quite thin without feeling cheap. It's 1.5mm in diameter on the head side and 2mm on the connector side.

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    The connector is terminated in a small, straight connector which is great. I do prefer a right angle connector since my phone is so big, but for most users this will be fine. On the very left is the included adapter and in the middle is the adapter of my preferred choice, branded by UGREEN. Highly recommend the UGREEN adapters since they're inexpensive, work on TRRS(android) headphones, and don't have intermittent issues like other cheap adapters such as the one included with the Ti.

    Sound

    With minimal packaging and slightly disappointing accessories, the Ti didn't leave that good of a first impression on me. I started sound testing, hoping that the cost of this IEM mostly went to the R&D of the earphones themselves. I've hooked up the Periodic Audio Ti to my Fulla 2, Magni 2(Fulla 2 as DAC), and my Samsung Galaxy Note 9 for testing. The default medium silicone tips were used for testing as I found those fit my ears the best.

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    Sound Signature

    I started with the best I had: a Magni 2 with a Fulla 2 as its DAC. I was pleasantly surprised with the results. The bass of the Ti is stunning. On other IEMs I've tried, I've found that they either had more punchy midbass than subbass rumble or vice versa. Not with the Titaniums. The Ti had bass which both rumbled and punched my eardrums. Really good job here.

    On the other hand, midrange takes a back seat on these IEMs. They're fairly good for sure, but vocals have a slight artificial hint and don't come to life like what I'm used to on my HD 6XX. Passable, but not remarkable. It's probably good to keep in mind that I am very picky with my midrange, and even prefer "shoutier" midrange headphones.

    Highs are crisp and clear. There's no grain of any sort. No issues here for me. I'm not that great at judging treble, but the high notes produced by the Ti never made listening unbearable in any way.

    The sound signature of the Ti is the definition of a V shape. Periodic Audio's description of the Ti is therefore quite accurate in my opinion and I agree with them 100%. Electronic and Pop sound great, but other genres like classical don't wow me quite as much.

    Imaging

    Imaging is spectacular on the Ti. In fact, I found imaging better than my HD 6XX and M1060C. I hopped into a game of CS:GO with these in and the accuracy of footsteps was uncanny. Can't think of anything more to put here. It's great.

    Sound Stage & Sound Separation

    Sound stage on the Ti is what I would consider medium-large for an IEM. I would describe it as having the stage slightly outside your head but not too much farther.

    Sound separation is fairly good as well. I define sound separation as the IEM's ability to produce distinct sources of sound. I find that multi-driver IEMs like the KZ ZS5 do this spectacularly well, likely due to their hybrid design. However, the Ti provides results which are better than the majority of single-driver IEMs that I've heard.

    Comfort & Isolation

    Just as a preface, I define "isolation" differently than "seal". Just because you have a good physical seal on your IEMs doesn't mean you get good sound isolation. This section will of course vary depending on the person's ear shape. So take it with a grain of salt.

    I found comfort to be just okay. The medium silicone tips sealed my ears extremely well, creating what feels like an airtight seal without any sort of driver flex. However, the exterior housing isn't angled, so the plastic head does end up contacting some cartilage on my outer ear. Nevertheless, I've worn these IEMs without too much trouble for sessions of up to 4 hours.

    Despite the excellent seal, the sound isolation is pretty standard with most other IEMs. It's good enough for a bus ride, but I don't expect any miracles on an airplane.

    Power & Efficiency

    Like most IEMs, these are quite efficient and are easily powered to a listening volume level. I had no issues powering them off my Samsung Galaxy Note 9. However, there's a noticeable difference in detail and sound quality when moving between sources. I was actually surprised how much these IEMs scaled on equipment. They'll sound satisfactory on a phone, but give them a proper headphone output and they'll shine even further.

    Conclusion

    I think that's about it. Overall, the Periodic Audio Ti is a surprisingly good V-shaped IEM that I feel is indicative of the price. The build quality feels solid enough, even though I wish that the cable was detachable and replaceable. The metal case tin is a nice touch, but the airplane adapter can be scrapped and the 1/4" adapter that's included needs to be of better quality. Overall, it's a keeper for me as none of the cons are what I would consider deal-breakers - just small shortcomings. Only time will tell when it comes to how the build holds up.

    Got thoughts? Leave a comment, as usual. I'll be back to read over this again for grammar and spelling mistakes, but until then, thanks for reading!

    tl;dr? Great V-Shaped IEM, but don't expect many accessories.
  2. Dobrescu George
    Periodic Audio Ti and Be - Musical Brothers
    Written by Dobrescu George
    Published Oct 29, 2018
    4.5/5,
    Pros - - Clean and Clear Sound
    - Excellent detail for the price
    - Good aesthetics
    - Pretty comfortable
    - Good bass and treble extension
    - Good all-rounder
    Cons - - Cable is not detachable
    Periodic Audio Titanium and Beryllium - Musical Brothers

    We reviewed the Magnesium IEM from Periodic Audio, and now it is time to also review the Titanium and Beryllium from the same lovely company, trying to figure if they have their place in this really rich and varied audio world.

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    Introduction

    Periodic Audio has became well-known since the last review we wrote on their products, and we couldn't be more happy, as their products are a statement to research and development in the audio world. We have only good words to tell about their customer support and interaction, and we've seen customers happy with the solutions periodic audio had whenever there was need for a service process. The company has an interesting idea behind their products, where their first three products were made to look and be built pretty much the same, with the biggest difference in the drivers, which resulted in differences in the sonics of each of those IEMs. We're going to be comparing Ti and Be variants of their IEMs, as well as comparing them with other IEMs in similar price brackets.

    It should be noted that I have absolutely no affiliation with Periodic Audio, I am not receiving any incentive for this review or to sweeten things out. This review is not sponsored nor has been paid for by Periodic Audio or anyone else. I'd like to thank Periodic Audio for providing the sample for this review. The sample was provided along with Periodic Audio's request for an honest and unbiased review. This review will be as objective as it is humanly possible, and it reflects my personal experience with Periodic Audio Be and Ti. Every opinion expressed is mine and I stand by it, the purpose of this review is to help those interested in Periodic Audio Be and Ti find their next music companion.



    About me

    https://audiophile-heaven.blogspot.ro/p/about.html




    Packaging

    First things first, let's get the packaging out of the way:


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    The package for Be and Ti is the same as it was with the Mg we reviewed before, and as we said before, we like the concept, and we like the fact that Periodic Audio includes a lot of technical data with their IEMs, including technical data about the materials used for the drivers.

    We are fans of the golden carrying case included with both, as it is a thick metal case, which should offer a good amount of protection to both IEMs, and we are fans of the number of tips and accessories included with the IEMs.

    Once opened, the boxes are not sealable anymore, so you should keep this in mind if you plan on having them exposed on a shelf.

    All in all, the packaging is great, nothing too fancy, but not lacking in any way.



    What to look in when purchasing an entry-level In-Ear Monitor

    https://audiophile-heaven.blogspot.ro/p/what-to-lookl.html




    Technical Specifications

    Ti

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    Be

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    Build Quality/Aesthetics/Fit/Comfort

    The build quality, aesthetics, fit, comfort, and isolation are exactly the same as those found on Periodic Audio Mg, which we reviewed before:

    https://audiophile-heaven.blogspot.com/2018/08/periodic-audio-magnesium-warm-delight.html


    To freshen up a bit, we should mention that the IEMs are barrel-type, they have a silicone tip with one of the most usual types of locking mechanism, they are well made, and you shouldn't have any issues wearing them portably. They isolate fairly well, and they o well with comfort.

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    The cable is not detachable, but it is of a good quality.

    The L and R markings on the IEMs are very different from other IEMs, Periodic Audio using red and blue wax grilles to determine which is the right and the left IEM.

    There is a difference in the color of the cap at the back of the IEM body, but that's pretty much the only difference we could find between different Periodic Audio IEMs, aesthetics and build quality wise.

    All Periodic Audio IEMs are vented, so there's no driver flex.


    All in all, the Aesthetics, Build Quality and Comfort are also great, and we couldn't find any faults with Periodic Audio IEMs, except for the fact that the cables are not detachable, but since they've been released, there've been no reports of the cables breaking, so we feel Periodic Audio has done a great job with the included cables.



    Sound Quality


    Ti

    Starting with the Ti, it has a thick and bassy sound, with a really nice instrument separation, good soundstage, a sweet presentation of the female vocals, and with a rather great treble extension, but with a smoother presentation of the upper treble. The ADSR/PRaT is on the smoother side all-around, so textures are not overly enhanced, and the sound is overly smooth, musical, fun and laid-back.

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    The bass of Ti is really deep and impressive, drums in metal are timed properly, and although their PRaT is on the smoother side, Ti can still keep up with metal and even death metal. Reach of the bass is as low as you could desire, although we'd like to note that it does thicken the midrange, and it is pretty warm all-around. The word "tactile" describes the bass very well.

    The midrange is sweet and smooth, a musicality euphoria status, where you're always surrounded by a melody of love and pleasure, and although this may sound like they are fuzzy, the instrument separation is actually quite good, and although the midrange is pushed back compared to the bass, it doesn't feel underpowered, being rather as most music lovers like it.

    The treble is actually something of an acquired taste, a smooth, relaxing and fun presentation, although well extended one. You're going to hear the higher octaves, but they won't be rough nor harsh, rather, they'll be relaxing and smooth, further enhancing the thicc bass and midrange. Treble is presented in line with the midrange, with the bass being the most forward element of the whole sound.

    A few things that impressed us with Ti, are that they keep being utterly clear even at crazy-loud volumes. Also, the value of Ti, compared to other IEMs we heard, makes them as detailed / clear as most ~350 USD IEMs, while their price tag is roughly 200 USD, so we're quite happy that Periodic Audio is pushing the Audio Industry to better prices.



    Be


    Now, about Be, this is the flagship of Periodic Audio's lineup, at the moment of writing this review. It is the best sounding of their offerings as well, a rather energetic and upbeat performer, with a V-shaped sound, with a good amount of warmth and thiccness, a more relaxed and musical midrange, and with a sparkly and fun-sounding treble.

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    The bass of Be is deep and powerful, although the focus is more centered around 100 Hz, rather than in the sub-bass, making be warm and emotional, working really well with rock, acoustic music, and with older music, rather than electronic. The bass can be a bit over enhanced on an overall level, but not because it distorts, as it is clear as the clearest day we've seen, but rather because it crosses a bit in the basshead territory, giving music a truly warm and friendly sound.

    The midrange is sweet and juicy, Be presenting music musically and fun, with a spot-on tone for both male and female vocals. There's a slight tilt towards a musical presentation, with a bit of a more happy tone to things than absolutely neutral, so music tends to sound a bit happier on Be than on a more neutrally-tuned IEM. The warmth of the bass also tilts the midrange a bit, giving some of that analogue-taste to the midrange as well.

    The treble of Be is incredibly well extended, with a good amount of sparkle, but without a lot of grain, being smooth and enjoyable to listen to for long periods of time. The extended treble gives them a really airy overall sound, with a really good instrument separation, and with a good amount of soundstage in both width and depth.


    All in all, the Be sounds like a great value for its 300 USD Price, they are the flagship of Periodic Audio's lineup, and just like Ti, they can go really loud without distortion, and they can be named one of the most organic-sounding IEMs we tested to date.



    Soundstage

    All Periodic Audio IEMs have a good amount of soundstage, but we could say that Be has a much larger soundstage in both width and depth, compared to Ti, and they are the biggest-sounding of all Periodic Audio's IEMs. The soundstage of Be becaiscally extends as good as you can wish for it to do for a IEM in this price range, it has a happy and fun presentation, while the soundstage of Ti is good, but it doesn't have the width that Be has.

    The instrument separation is quite great on both, and we couldn't complain about either, Be being slightly better in this aspect than Ti, but both having great instrument separation.



    ADSR / PRaT


    The ADSR and PRaT (Texturization) is slow to natural with Ti, and quicker on Be. This means that with Ti, most textured instruments will be smoot, making most music musical, without an analytical edge, while Be has a more natural overall PRaT, meaning that they are more textury, but again, their presentation is not overly analytical either, leading to a sound that is clear, organic and natural.



    Portable Usage

    The ortable usage is excellent for both IEMs, neither doesn't require any special care for picking their source, as they are easily driveable from a smartphone, and both are pretty resistant to hiss, and neither doesn't have any hiss from something like Hiby R6.

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    It is possible to walk and jog while wearing both Be and Ti, and it is possible to enjoy a long walk wearing both, but we surely would recommend taking care when inserting the IEMs, because they have small vent holes at the top, and if those vents are covered, it could lead to some driver flex.

    On this page, Periodic Audio IEMs have no driver flex, and they are all a pleasure to sue for long periods of time.

    The cables on both are similar, they are supple and flexible, but the cable aren't quite that interesting-looking on either, making them a great IEM to wear if you don't want to get too much attention, like say, while walking in a not-too-friendly place.


    Noise isolation is quite good, and you can walk on a busy street while wearing them, without minding the noise too much, and they don't leak very much, but they are not very isolating in either way, being fit for isolation in most environments, but not being a library dead-silent IEM, nor sealing you away from noise quite like an Etymotic IEM.

    Due to their easy-to-drive nature, and their fun sound with most sources, good isolation, and no driver flex, we consider that both reach our golden standards for portability and portable usage.



    Comparisons


    We'll try comparing both Be and Ti with a few IEMs close in terms of price and performance.

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    Periodic Audio Ti vs Dunu Falcon-C - This comparison is interesting because Falcon-C is priced almost the same as Periodic Audio Ti, but it has quite a different sound. Starting with the package, Falcon-C has a great package, just like Ti, but Falcon-C has detachable cables, based on the MMCX standard, while Ti has no detachable cables. Going forward to the comfort, Falcon-C can only be worn over-the-ear, while Ti can be worn both straight-down and over-the-ear. Falcon-C is a bit more open than Ti, so it leaks more and isolates a bit less than Ti. The sound is much more V-shaped on Falcon-C, with more treble emphasis, less bass emphasis, a less tactile bass, and a more balanced overall presentation. In this sense, Falcon-C works better for metal music, and for electronic music, although Ti's tactile bass makes them quite a good fit for electronic music as well. Now, Ti has a much thiccer bass, a much warmer and smoother sound, and if you want the sweetest midrange, but with a thicc bass, then Ti will surely give that to you, along with the option of wearing them straight-down as well if you desire to.

    Periodic Audio Be vs Oriveti New Primacy - This is a great example of even pricing between items, although here, ONP and Be are a little clsoer to each other than Ti and Falcon-C were. ONP is a natural and even-sounding IEM, with a nice amount of texture. Starting with the package, ONP has a similarly great package, but it has a detachable cable, compared to Be, which does not. ONP can mainly be worn over-the-ear, while Be can be worn both over-the-ear and straight-down. The comfort is not better with ONP, as they suffer a bit from Driver Flex, while Be does not. In terms of sound, Be is much warmer, with a much more sparkly treble, and a more impressive overall sound, although if you're looking for a flatter, more honest presentation of music, ONP surely achieves that well. If you're looking to be impressed by a thicc, warm, sparkly, and fun sound, Be is a safe bet, while if you're looking for a more even, more natural presentation, ONP is still a great choice, provided you don't mind a bit of driver flex.

    Periodic Audio Be vs FiiO FH5 - This is an elephant in the room we couldn't ignore, FiiO FH5 is priced close enough to Be, or rather even lower than Be, so we need to do this comparison most of you asked us to do. Starting with the package, FiiO clearly has an advantage in terms of tips, and FH5 comes with a much more solid-looking cable, they are made of metal, while the shells of Be is made of plastic, and FH5 is an over-the-ear only IEM, while Be is both over-the-ear and straight-down. Now, the comfort isn't necessarily better with FH5, as they have a somewhat shallow insertion depth, so it is easier to lose seal with them, especially considering that Be makes a great seal, but we'd say that both are fairly great in terms of comfort. The sound is quite different actually, with FH5 being similarly thicc as Be is, but with more emphasis and focus on the midrange, with Be having the midrange pulled back, and its treble enhanced. This means that if you prefer a more thicc, but mid-forward presentation, the FH5 makes one heck of a choice, while if you prefer a more V-shaped presentation, with a nice treble sparkle, then Be makes a great choice. The soundstage is also much more airy and wider on Be, while on FH5, it is more intimate, making this a matter of taste.



    Recommended Pairings

    Both be and Ti are fairly easy to drive and both scale a little with a better source.

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    Periodic Audio Be + Shanling M0 - Shanling M0 is a really inexpensive Ultraportable that will drive Be close to its maximum potential, and should provide a really amazing overall price/performance ratio. They can get M0 incredibly loud, and still clear, textured, and with their original signature, as M0 doesn't have much of a tuning of its own, making it an ideal player for those on-the-go, looking for a nice, inexpensive DAP.

    Periodic Audio Be + HIDIZS AP80 - HIDIZS AP80 is another great option for those looking for an ultra-portable that is inexpensive, but which provides a great performance. It has a similar overall sound when compared to M0, but while it doesn't have the same great volume wheel, and while it has more corners, its screen is a little better suited for touch usage, and it has forward / backward buttons, making it a great overall portable DAP as well.

    Periodic Audio Be + iBasso DX120 - iBasso DX20 is a great little DAP, with a lot going on for it, including the price, which is very acceptable for a device of its power. It has two microSD slots, it has a lot of power, and even a balanced output, making it a pretty future-proof option, and pairing it with Be results in an even better overall texture when compared to ultraportables pairings, DX120 also has a larger display, making it more suited for those with large hands, and for managing large music libraries.



    Value and Conclusion


    We've been writing about two IEMs from different price brackets, but we enjoyed writing about them together either way, as they are built to look, feel, and wear the same, but they sound quite a little different from each other. We find amazing what Periodic Audio has shown to us, by using exactly the same housing with their IEMs, basically highlighting how much of a difference the driver alone can make for a IEM.

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    From the overly smooth and bassy sound of Ti, to the textury V-shaped, organic and natural sound of Be, we feel that both IEMs are quite exceptional in terms of sonic performance and clarity.

    Starting with the package, it is similar for both IEMs, and it is a rather basic package in its nature, but Periodic Audio have been nice enough to include a lot of useful data with their IEMs, for example technical data about the exotic material embedded in their driver. There is a good number of tips and accessories, and all Periodic Audio IEMs come with a beautiful metallic carrying case.

    Starting with the build quality and aesthetics, both IEMs are well built and they feel solid in hand, they have a basic-looking but effective cable, which is not microphonic at all, and although we wish they had a removable cable, we're happy that they included a high-quality cable for their IEMs. The exceptional customer service of Periodic Audio is a good part in purchasing their products, and a good reason why you can trust their build quality and non-detachable cable.

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    The wearing comfort is great, as is the isolation and the ease of pairing them with anything you already have, making both great portable IEMs.

    If you're looking for a smooth, thicc, musical and laid-back sound with a tactile bass, a great instrument separation and with a really sweet and juicy midrange, then Periodic Audio Ti should be at the top of your searching list, especially if you want something that does much more than its price point would indicate. For 200 USD, Ti is one deal you don't want to miss, especially if you plan on using both straight-down and over-the-ear wearing styles and if you don't mind being a little careful about the cable, as it is not detachable.

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    If you want to hear the best Periodic Audio has to offer, then Be is your best choice, and they are indeed one amazing IEM. Their sound is in line with other Be based headphones and IEMs, with a really nice warm bass, with a juicy and fun midrange, and with a good amount of sparkle in the treble. The soundstage tends to extend quite a lot, in both the width and the depth, with an airy, and well separated sound. Periodic Audio Be should totally be in your list if you're looking for a warm, thicc, moderately V-shaped, airy, and organic-natural sounding IEM.



    Playlist used for this review


    While we listened to considerably more songs than those named in this playlist, those are excellent for identifying certain aspects of the sound, like PRaT, Texturization, Detail, Resolution, Dynamics, Impact, and overall tonality. We recommend trying most of the songs from this playlist, especially if you're searching for new most, most of them being rather catchy.

    Bats - Gamma Ray Burst: Second Date
    Eskimo Callboy - Frances
    Incubus - Summer Romance
    Electric Six - Dager! High Voltage
    Kishida Cult - High School Of The Dead
    Dimmu Borgir - Dimmu Borgir

    Breaking Benjamin - I Will Not Bow
    Manafest - Impossible
    Thousand Foot Krutch - The Flame In All Of Us
    Gorillaz - Feel Good Inc.
    Infected Mushroom - Song Pong
    Docor P - Bulletproof
    Maximum The Hormone - Rock n Roll Chainsaw
    Rob Zombie - Werewolf, Baby!
    SOAD - Chop Suey
    Ken Ashcorp - Absolute Territory
    Machinae Supremacy - Need For Steve
    Ozzy Osbourne - I Don't Wanna Stop
    Crow'sclaw - Loudness War
    Eminem - RapGod
    Stromae - Humain À L'eau
    Justin Timberlake - Sexy Back
    Metallica - Fuel
    Veil Of Maya - Unbreakable
    Masa Works - Golden Japang
    REOL - Luvoratorrrrry

    Korn - Word Up!
    Papa Roach - ... To be Loved
    Fever The Ghost - Source
    Fall Out Boy - Immortals
    Green Day - Know The Enemy
    Mindless Self Indulgence - London Bridge
    A static Lullaby - Toxic
    Royal Republic - Tommy Gun
    Astronautalis - The River, The Woods
    Skillet - What I Believe




    I hope my review is helpful to you, and I hope you have a good evening in there!!


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      voxie likes this.
  3. Cinder
    Titanium Never Sounded Sounded So Good
    Written by Cinder
    Published Sep 15, 2018
    4.0/5,
    Pros - Impressive V-shaped sound signature, punchy and rumbly bass, phenomenal technical ability and detail retrieval, great accessory package, cohesive and immersive sonic characteristics, light, comfortable
    Cons - In need of revamped construction
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    Periodic Audio Ti Review: Titanium Never Sounded So Good
    Periodic Audio is a company heavily grounded in science. They take an objective, bare-bones, approach to audio that revolves around R&D, not marketing. Such an approach is not one that is easily found these days and as is quite welcome. The Ti is Periodic Audio’s mid-tier IEM, coming in at a price of $200. Does Periodic Audio’s approach to creating IEMs result in competitive products? Or is the Ti just another middle-of-the-pack design?

    You can find the Ti for sale here for $200.

    About My Preferences: Heads up, I’m a person! As such, these words are my opinion, and they are tinged by my personal preferences. While I try to mitigate this as much as possible during my review process, I’d be lying if I said my biases are completely erased. So for you, my readers, keep this in mind:

    • My ideal sound signature would be an extended sub-bass with a leveled, but textured, mid-bass.
    • I have a mild treble sensitivity.
    Source: The Ti was powered like so:

    HTC U11 -> USB-C adapter -> earphones

    or

    Hidizs AP100 3.5mm out -> FiiO A5 3.5mm out -> earphones

    or

    HiFiMAN SuperMini -> earphones

    or

    PC optical out -> HiFiMe SPDIF 9018 Sabre DAC 3.5mm out -> earphones

    All music was served as MP3 @320Kbps or as FLAC.

    Tech Specs
    • Frequency Response: 16 Hz to 30 kHz
    • Impedance: 32 Ohms nominal
    • Sensitivity: 96 dB SPL at 1mW in ear
    • Power Handling: 200 mW continuous
    • Peak SPL: 117.5 dB
    • THD: Less than 1.5% THD at 1mW
    Sound Signature
    Sonic Overview:

    The Ti is Periodic Audio’s take on a proper V-shaped IEM. Emphasized bass and treble combined with excellent timbral characteristics make it a great all-arounder suited to tackling most genres. Its sub-bass extends well and has both rumble and body. Its midrange is expressive, though recessed, and is mostly neutral with a hint of warmth. The Ti’s treble is highly resolving, airy, and well suited to complementing its bass.

    Treble: Songs used: In One Ear, Midnight City, Outlands, Satisfy, Little One, Show Me How To Live (Live at the Quart Festival)

    The biggest complaint I hear about dynamic driver IEMs is one regarding their lackluster treble performance. Well, I can safely say that the Ti easily puts that argument to sleep. While it isn’t perfect, the Ti displays a natural and “effortless” treble that captures so much nuance. The last time I heard a dynamic driver IEM “sparkle” so well while maintaining a sound signature that was free from harshness was over a year ago while reviewing the Chord & Major lineup. But tonality aside, the Ti’s treble exhibits some impressive technical performance. It picks up many details that would otherwise go unheard and provides the “airiness” that makes the Ti so easy the listen to.

    Midrange: Songs used: Flagpole Sitta, Jacked Up, I Am The Highway, Dreams, Too Close, Little Black Submarines

    A core feature of V-shaped IEMs is their recessed midranges, and the Ti is no exception. Its lower-midrange is mostly neutral, having only a small amount of warmth to give instrumentation some weight and character. The upper-midrange has a spike in the 1KHz-2KHz range designed to give vocals and lead-instrumentation some separation and clarity. Overall, the tact with which Periodic Audio tuned the Ti is incredibly impressive, as evidenced by just how good the midrange sounds even when recessed.

    The Ti does not seem to have a significant bias towards male or female vocals, having merely a mild preference towards male singers. This is an artifact of V-shaped sound signatures and is something you can find in most popular V-shaped products.

    Bass: Songs used: Moth, Gold Dust, In For The Kill (Skream Remix), War Pigs (Celldweller Remix)

    The Ti’s bass is befitting of a V-shaped IEM. It has expertly-balanced mid and sub-bass presentation. There’s little to no bleed into the midrange at all, even at higher volumes and during songs with intense bass lines. The mid-bass is punchy, relatively quick, and naturally-toned. Be it the busy drop of Gold Dust, the bass guitars of Moth, or the sonorous bass line of In For The Kill, the Ti staged and manifested its bass flawlessly, at least to my ears. The Ti reaches very far down into the lower register and doesn’t roll off till well into the sub-bass’s deepest components.

    Packaging / Unboxing
    I do not have any packaging on me for the Ti. See this review for information about how Periodic Audio packages their IEMs. All of the IEMs that Periodic Audio sell use the same packaging (save for some changes to the text on the boxes from model to model).

    Build
    Construction Quality
    The Ti has the same exact build as the other IEMs in the lineup, at least externally (save for a difference in cap color). The housings are made of a polycarbonate: a light plastic that supposedly has zero internal resonance. The stress reliefs are made from a somewhat stiff plastic. It doesn’t feel like it does much to relieve cable stress in more extreme situations though. A softer and more pliable material may be more suited to get the job done here.

    [​IMG]
    The Ti’s nozzles have also been revised. Instead of featuring the colored wired mesh that the V1 used, all the Periodic Audio V2 IEMs use a finely-perforated plate that sits flush with the lip of the nozzle. The right side is colored red to give you a visual indicator of which channel is which.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The cable has also been revised to not use metal parts on the cable. While there’s no difference in functionality, I do miss the small amounts of flair that they gave the V1 units.

    And speaking of cables, I think we should talk about the cables that Periodic Audio uses. They aren’t bad per say, they just don’t feel sturdy in a way that you’d expect from a $100-$300 IEM. Increasing the thickness, using a (reasonable) braided cable, or even adding a structural layer of sleeving would each be very much appreciated and add a lot to the fit and finish of the Periodic Audio lineup.

    Comfort

    The Ti is very comfortable, especially when using the foam eartips that were in the box. The housings are so light that they are barely noticeable when in use. I had no problems when wearing them for over three hours during a project at work. They even worked ok while jogging, though they do stick out a bit too far for comfort for my comfort during rigorous exercise.

    Accessories
    The Ti comes very well stocked, especially for a $100 IEM. Inside the box you’ll find:

    [​IMG]
    • 3x pairs of silicone eartips
    • 3x pairs of foam eartips
    • 3x pairs of dual-flange eartips
    • 1x airline adapter
    • 1x 1/4in adapter
    • 1x hard carrying case
    [​IMG]
    The carrying case is compact but still has plenty of room to easily store the Ti. The lid screws on and doesn’t seem to have any looseness issues that a more poorly-machined case might.

    Comparisons
    1: Periodic Audio Mg ($100)

    The Ti is more V-shaped than the Mg is. It has a more emphasized treble and more prominent bass, extending well to the 50Hz range. The Ti trades in a very small of midrange presence for a treble sparkle and bass impact/rumble. Other than that the Ti and Mg share many, if not most, of their core characteristic tone-wise.

    2: Brainwavz B400 ($200)

    The B400 is more linear and provides a warmer midrange than the Ti. These two IEMs have very different sound signatures that really puts them in very different positions in terms of what they are aiming to do. The B400 is looking towards finding a flatter, but still fun, sound signature while the Ti throws caution to the wind and goes all-in on being V-shaped. The B400 articulates its midrange a better, but it doesn't blow the Ti out of the water like one might automatically assume in a BA vs DD match-up. The Ti’s bass is much more natural-sounding and impactful. While the B400 does an admirable job maintaining rumble, the Ti simply outperforms it with its full-sized dynamic driver.

    3: Magaosi K3 HD ($120)

    The K3 HD is one of my, and many others’, favorite V-shaped IEMs. Instead of tackling the task of creating an IEM using a single driver, or a single type of driver, the Magaosi employed a hybrid-driver configuration for the K3 HD: one balanced-armature driver to handle the upper frequencies and one dynamic driver to handle the lower ones. This contrasts the Periodic Audio approach in both principal and practice. While the K3 HD does have a somewhat better grasp on the upper-treble than the Ti does, it ultimately fails to create the perfectly cohesive sound signature that uniquely benefits the Ti. However, these shortcomings can also be explained by the price difference between the two products (the Ti is $80 more than the K3 HD).

    Summary
    The Ti has an incredible sound signature. It was tuned with care and has no obvious or out-standing shortcomings. While it could certainly use a reworked body and cable to add a little more durability, it isn’t in immediate danger of spontaneous failure, making it suitable for daily use. The Ti’s notable performance, easy to listen to sound signature, and competitive pricing has earned it a place in my personal IEM rotation. I highly recommend it to listeners who are ready to jump into Hi-Fi Audio, or are just fans of V-shaped sound signatures and want to get one of the best IEMs for it around. Keep up the good work Periodic Audio!

    As always, happy listening!
      hqssui likes this.
  4. mejoshua
    Speed specialist - exquisite bass and treble
    Written by mejoshua
    Published May 30, 2017
    4.0/5,
    Pros - Weighty and fast bass experience, detailed treble without being splashy or peaky
    Cons - Mids might be a tad thin; V shaped signature might have mids that are too recessed for some
    Before I begin the review, I would like to take the opportunity to thank Dan and team at Periodic Audio for allowing me to review their debut IEM lineup. As a budding reviewer, I really do appreciate the opportunity given. The IEMs will be sent back to Periodic Audio after the review. Because I can only post one review for each item at a time, the same opening paragraphs will be repeated for all three IEMs, with only the review on sound differing.


    A short preamble before the review proper: Periodic Audio takes an interesting approach to their design philosophy. I will not bore you with details here – you can find all you need to know about their company and approach on their very neatly designed website, periodicaudio.com.


    Two things that I found most novel in terms of design and engineering choices, which is reflected in their company name, is firstly, their choice of driver material is based off certain elements on the periodic table. Their opening lineup includes Mg (Magnesium driver), Ti (Titanium driver) and Be (Beryllium driver), which is their current top-of-the-line offering. Beryllium seems to be a popular choice of material for hifi, which I recall the popular Focal Utopia headphones also utilizes.

    Secondly, Dan and team have chosen to use a polycarbonate shell for the IEM housing, which purportedly reduces resonance drastically. I was skeptical at first, but after my initial impressions which I will go into later, I realized that it sounds like they are on to something.


    Packaging and Accessories:

    The packaging comes in a utilitarian white cardboard box, and in it contains the IEMs, as well as a selection of tips including silicone and complys in small Ziploc packs, stuffed inside the yellow gold metal container with the Periodic Audio logo emblazoned on the top shell. They have also generously included an in-flight adapter as well as a 3.5mm to 6.35mm (1/4”) adaptor. Some may raise an issue with the quality of the packaging, but personally I can see that Periodic Audio has chosen to focus on the quality of the product and accessories, which they clearly delivered on.


    Design:

    All 3 Periodic IEMs sport the same outer shell and housing, with the differentiating factor being the piece that covers the back of the IEM indicating the type of metal used. The Mg has a shinier silver back plate; the Ti has a slightly darker hue, a gunmetal type tint back plate; and the Be being the easiest to spot among the pack, having a darkish golden back plate that is quite aesthetically pleasing. The polycarbonate shell feels tougher and harder than it sounds, and is a deep black. What is also interesting is that there are no L/R indicators on the shells or the strain reliefs, but the guys at Periodic have opted to colour-code the earpiece filters. The left earpiece has a blue filter, and the right has a red filter. The only downside about this is when trying to identify them in an environment that may have little light – it might be difficult to tell the difference then. I had no issues during the day though.

    The housing itself is also a vented design, and the vent can be found at the top of the earpiece.

    My only niggle with the IEM design probably has to be the cable. The cable seems run-of-the-mill, and does not feel sturdy enough to endure daily abuse. It also has some cable memory, tends to get tangled easily and is also not very compliant during coiling and storing.





    Comfort and Seal:

    I found all 3 IEMs to fit well and fit quickly, with very decent levels of isolation when I’m out and about during the day. This is with the default silicone tips. Once they are in, they also do not move about easily, and I find that they sit snugly in my ears. The IEMs can be worn both over ear and on ear, but when worn with the cable dangling downwards I tend to get microphonics. This is largely a non-issue when the cable is worn over ear though.


    Sound:

    Sources used – Onkyo DP-X1A, Sony A15

    Looking at the frequency graph as well as the short description accompanying it on the Ti product page, one would expect the Ti to be aggressive and harshly v-shaped. I am someone who is quite averse to v-shaped signatures. This was exactly what I was expecting and I was very surprised to find that it was not even half as bad as I thought. It was a very clean signature with significant heft in the bass regions, as well as a well extended treble without peaks or sibilance, which is something that I am impressed with, being someone who is acutely sensitive to the treble domains. I would not disagree that it is a v-shaped signature with a clear focus on the two extremes but as a mids lover I found this surprisingly easy to listen to.


    Bass:

    You get a very similar tuning with the Mg but the bass of the Ti is definitely further north of neutral, and gives noticeably more kick than the Mg. It extends well down below, and with songs that have some real sub bass action going on you're really going to feel it. Of course it's not so linear, with a greater emphasis on the mid bass but clearly this is not one of your average and ubiquitous Beats-styled earphones with just bass and little else. The midbass is tuned in such a way that it is heavy, yes, but only insofar as giving you all the texturing and rumble that is conveyed through a slightly more romantic decay, yet without the sense of bloom and muddiness that most other IEMs end up sounding. The turn of pace is just speedy enough to hit the next note before you feel like the bass is dragging you down. What results is a very immersive bass experience with a lot of fine detailing, and what really hit me was how tactile it felt.


    Mids:

    There is great clarity in the mids, and without any bleeding from the Low frequencies what you get is a very clean tonality and good resolution. Vocal lovers might be somewhat disappointed here though, if you are looking for warmth. I noted earlier that the bass is a tad boosted in the mid bass, which does lend itself to some body in the midrange, but its core signature still remains a v-shape. The mids are in no way recessed, mind you, just that it lacks the thickness of note and warmth that characterises more mid centric IEMs. What you get is a very clean tone with great detail, but what some might consider on the dry or analytical side. I would also say that compared with the Mg, the Ti has more detail and resolves midrange notes a little more capably. Instrumental timbre is also reproduced fairly accurately, and has good bite and crunch, especially with electric guitars and synthesised tones.


    Treble:

    The treble is fast, clear and extended. I felt less fatigue than I expected going by the frequency graph of the Ti. The treble is quick footed with lightning fast decays, resulting in a very detailed rendering of cymbal heavy tracks. I could pick out the individual crashes and shimmers that I usually would not pay attention to, and even then I could not detect sibilance or any semblance of harsh peaks that could irritate listeners during longer listening sessions. This speaks highly of the expert tuning of the treble. I particularly enjoyed Snarky Puppy and instrumental jazz on the Ti.


    Staging/Imaging/Separation:

    With the Mg as a baseline reference, the Ti provides a slightly wider stage with increased resolving ability. Imagine facing the semi-circle of the Mg's stage, but having a little more width that extends further left and right, with its ends going slightly behind the ears. It lacks ultimate z-axis detail and depth to sound truly holographic, but is a euphonic tuning nonetheless. Separation is still top notch and reminiscent of the Mg, where individual instruments are clearly delineated in the stereo field. Imaging is again good in its price tier but may not be the best because of how depth is not as well portrayed as width and height.


    Matching:

    Again, the Ti, like the Mg, would pair well with darker/warmer sources. While a cleaner and brighter source might appeal to trebleheads, the majority of listeners may have early onset of fatigue with less synergistic pairings. I picked the Sony A15 over the DP-X1A pairing for a better resultant tonal match. I'm not too sure if the bass levels are heavy enough for bassheads, not being a basshead myself, but I would definitely recommend using the Ti for bass heavy and/or more treble indulgent genres like electronica, metal, and instrumental jazz type music.

    Conclusion:

    Periodic Audio has served up a potent combination of IEMs suited to different budgets and tastes in its entrance to the audiophile market. One can hardly go wrong with either the Mg, Ti or the Be. For my personal preferences I’d pick the Be any day, because I’m biased toward a musical tuning that has focus on engaging mids and quality bass. But if one is on a budget, the Mg comes with a high recommendation. I find the Ti more of a specialist – if you love rock or metal, or genres that tend more toward a v-shaped tonal profile then the Ti would be perfect. Well done, Dan and team at Periodic Audio!

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