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post #31 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkninja67 View Post
The Toshiba XF550 series is one to look at. Also look at the Samsung A550 series. They are solid too. The Sonys are just being released for the most part but are typically higher priced for what they give you.

EDIT: You can get a Sammy 52A550 for under $2K which is a good deal on a great 60Hz set.
LCD does have 120Hz models though ya? Probably want that.

My company gets discounts with Panasonic (I guess for plasma if I do that) or Sharp. Prices don't seem especially better than whatever's lowest internet price, but yeah it's convenient.

Also anything new about the laser tvs? I kind of want a laser tv. Lasers mmmm
post #32 of 206
Pioneer Kuro are supposed to be the dogs' doo-dahs but they're very pricey. I ended up buying a Panasonic TH42PX70 plasma and have no regrets.
post #33 of 206
I bought a Panasonic 42PX75U that I got last summer. I worked at Circuit City so I got it brand new for $800. Best deal/purchase I have had so far, I think.
post #34 of 206
i hate you guys, first headphones, now tvs.

i want a hdtv now =[
post #35 of 206
i can understand how running the TV at 120Hz can help motion blur a bit but what really causes motion blur is the switching of the liquid crystal. if someone can come up with faster LC then motion blur will be less of a problem. either that or get a plasma and you won't have to worry about motion blur and have high contrast but then you'll have to worry about wash out from sunlight and high power consumption.
post #36 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by fureshi View Post
but then you'll have to worry about wash out from sunlight and high power consumption.
and the big con: burn in. Yeah I know there are ways to prevent this (I owned a Panny awhile back) but you can still get image burn in with plasmas.
post #37 of 206
I have a question: How does a 120 Hz refresh rate benefit TV or movie watching? I thought that the highest BD/HDDVD/DVD/HDTV signal was 60 Hz? Or am I wrong?
post #38 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by intoflatlines View Post
I have a question: How does a 120 Hz refresh rate benefit TV or movie watching? I thought that the highest BD/HDDVD/DVD/HDTV signal was 60 Hz? Or am I wrong?
According to this month's HiFi Choice magazine (UK), you get "smoother motion and less stutter" when 120Hz (or 100Hz in the UK) is switched on. It'll be more noticeable on channels that run a ticker across the bottom of the screen, however it can lead to nasty effects when watching things like football (soccer) or snooker, much like on a CRT.
post #39 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by intoflatlines View Post
I have a question: How does a 120 Hz refresh rate benefit TV or movie watching? I thought that the highest BD/HDDVD/DVD/HDTV signal was 60 Hz? Or am I wrong?
The reason is that film is shot in 24 frames per second and 120Hz is multiple of 24. Below is an exerpt from "120Hz HDTVs: The Secret to Making Movies Look as Smooth as Butter"[/B]


"Film is 24 frames per second. That standard was the approximation of what was defined in the early 20th century by hand crank cameras. And just about every movie disc you can buy is encoded in this format. We're not just talking DVD. We're talking about HD DVD and Blu-ray, too.

The problem is, most TVs run at 30 frames per second. Fitting that 24-frame content onto a 30-frame screen isn't that easy; the math just doesn't compute cleanly. You can't divide 24 by 30 without filling in the gaps with some junk. That junk causes stuttering in the video. This is a jerky-looking phenomenon that's particularly noticeable when the camera pans across a scene. The conversion is better known by film and TV wonks as 2:3 pulldown. It spreads out 24 frames into 30 by placing one frame on the screen three times and the next one after that two times, and repeating this pattern ad infinitum.

How does this relate to an 120Hz HDTV showing frames at 120 frames per second? A bit of simple math tells you that 120 is a multiple of 24, because 24 x 5 = 120. So one of the claims of the purveyors of these sped-up monitors is that they can natively reproduce 24p programming, namely, just about every film has ever been shot.

These new HDTVs avoid this awkward 3:2 pulldown process altogether by changing their frame rate to something that's a multiple of 24 by using either frame doubling or interpolation (also called "tweening"). Then, their playback can be as close to native 24fps playback as you can get. "


Also take a look at "What's the Big Deal About 1080p24?".
post #40 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by uofmtiger View Post
The reason is that film is shot in 24 frames per second and 120Hz is multiple of 24. Below is an exerpt from "120Hz HDTVs: The Secret to Making Movies Look as Smooth as Butter"[/B]


"Film is 24 frames per second. That standard was the approximation of what was defined in the early 20th century by hand crank cameras. And just about every movie disc you can buy is encoded in this format. We're not just talking DVD. We're talking about HD DVD and Blu-ray, too.

The problem is, most TVs run at 30 frames per second. Fitting that 24-frame content onto a 30-frame screen isn't that easy; the math just doesn't compute cleanly. You can't divide 24 by 30 without filling in the gaps with some junk. That junk causes stuttering in the video. This is a jerky-looking phenomenon that's particularly noticeable when the camera pans across a scene. The conversion is better known by film and TV wonks as 2:3 pulldown. It spreads out 24 frames into 30 by placing one frame on the screen three times and the next one after that two times, and repeating this pattern ad infinitum.

How does this relate to an 120Hz HDTV showing frames at 120 frames per second? A bit of simple math tells you that 120 is a multiple of 24, because 24 x 5 = 120. So one of the claims of the purveyors of these sped-up monitors is that they can natively reproduce 24p programming, namely, just about every film has ever been shot.

These new HDTVs avoid this awkward 3:2 pulldown process altogether by changing their frame rate to something that's a multiple of 24 by using either frame doubling or interpolation (also called "tweening"). Then, their playback can be as close to native 24fps playback as you can get. "


Also take a look at "What's the Big Deal About 1080p24?".
nice post, thx
post #41 of 206
Here is a pic of my living room setup:



I moved my 61inch 720P DLP to the bedroom and moved the Westinghouse 1080p 42 inch monitor (that was in my bedroom) to my office. I still need to get pics of those rooms...
post #42 of 206
uofmtiger, I am jealous of that setup. Very much. Not to mention a 61" in the bedroom!

Also, thanks for the info about 120 Hz. So, the conversion from 24fps to 60/30 occurs in the actual TV or the source?
post #43 of 206
I do not believe Sony ever made a DLP tv. They were big with rear projection, then 2 chip LCD micro displays, then their version of LCoS (SXRD).
post #44 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by uofmtiger View Post
Here is a pic of my living room setup:



I moved my 61inch 720P DLP to the bedroom and moved the Westinghouse 1080p 42 inch monitor (that was in my bedroom) to my office. I still need to get pics of those rooms...
Uofmtiger, did you take that pic? Looking at the borders, that image with the cute tigers on the screen seems photoshopped and pasted on top of the original photo.
post #45 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsaavedra View Post
Uofmtiger, did you take that pic? Looking at the borders, that image with the cute tigers on the screen seems photoshopped and pasted on top of the original photo.
It is...it is a shot with the lights on and off and the dark shot (of the screen) is photoshopped onto the light shot. Just too lazy to work at getting it purrfect. I should have taken the shot with the TV off creating a better black background of which to put the cats on....Anyway, it is the TV with my stuff under it and next to it with the TV on...you can see all of it better this way.

(The cats shot was taken from the Planet Earth Blu-ray series while it was pawsed/paused).

Here was the old setup (This TV is now in my bedroom - waiting on speaker stands before I take new pics):

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