Why do you like bass ( deepness , impact , blablabla ) ??
Mar 23, 2006 at 3:11 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 56

boodi

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Nov 19, 2001
Posts
5,741
Likes
136
?
me , I like it .
I'm happy with a nice tight deeeeep bass , not happy with a fat bloom bass .
but this doesn't matter the matter is why , what's in the bass .

*never saw someone writing " ahhh
very_evil_smiley.gif
how I like and feel these highs
very_evil_smiley.gif
"
pleasure in the highs is more about defining a rational perception
*and rarely "
k1000smile.gif
I'm awestruck by those middles"
mids draw delicate feelings and psicological affection , giving measured soul pleasures

why the bass rule the world so much ?
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 3:26 PM Post #2 of 56

luckybaer

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Feb 21, 2006
Posts
2,071
Likes
145
Bass is what draws me into most music. Whether I'm tapping my foot or breaking my neck, bass serves me the way a lightbulb on a porch serves a moth.

Many times bass needs to be "felt" - like for dance tunes, hip-hop, etc. For those occasions, I like a can that allows me to "feel" the bass - like the DT 770/80 Pro, and to an extent the KSC-75s. Other times, like for most rock and mellow stuff, a nice, controlled bass that I can hear but not "feel" is what I need. That's when I use my E4c's.
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 3:36 PM Post #3 of 56

Purgatos

500+ Head-Fier
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Posts
901
Likes
11
I have no idea. I've never thought of it as being any more or less important than the mids or highs.

I guess though, because in a lot of popular genres the music is really built around the bass stuff. Whether it's a bass drum or a bass guitar it tends to be what the rest of the music is constructed on top of in a lot of cases. I think. Maybe I'm just talking nonsense.
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 4:38 PM Post #4 of 56

Glod

1000+ Head-Fier
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Posts
1,352
Likes
10
Location
The Netherlands
Quote:

Originally Posted by boodi
?
me , I like it .
I'm happy with a nice tight deeeeep bass , not happy with a fat bloom bass .
but this doesn't matter the matter is why , what's in the bass .

*never saw someone writing " ahhh
very_evil_smiley.gif
how I like and feel these highs
very_evil_smiley.gif
"
pleasure in the highs is more about defining a rational perception
*and rarely "
k1000smile.gif
I'm awestruck by those middles"
mids drow delicate feelings and psicological affection , and measured soul pleasures

why the bass rule the world so much ?



I don't really agree with you on this one. I think there are a lot of discussions about the mid range and the treble as well. They are brought up in virtually all reviews more or less. I would say, especially in cable and tube reviews, you see relatively a lot of attention to these frequency bands. That said; read any discussions about the popular DT880? The midrange discussion almost always comes up when talking about these. Another example of midrange and high's praising you get when you read what people are writing about the war-time Sylvania 6SN7GT (VT-231). Ironically, that tube is known also for its weak bass.
600smile.gif
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 4:49 PM Post #5 of 56

Aman

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
May 12, 2004
Posts
4,475
Likes
15
Audiophiles strive for good sound, not for good types of a certain sound. Bass is most recognized because the body can actually feel the waves that bass creates - deep, punchy bass is felt when emitted, and it therefore implements more than just the sense of hearing when it is let out. This so-called "tight", "deep" bass is normally not even close to natural. An acoustic plucked upright bass does not sound like it does through those 'basshead' speaker systems.

If your quest in audio is bass, then you might as well get a 14 inch subwoofer and strap it to your head. Then you'd actually be able to enjoy only what you're wanting to enjoy and leave the rest of the music out of the picture, thereby eliminating any other distractions.
rolleyes.gif


Most audible sound in real life is in the 'midrange' category. It is thus most important to make sure those sound good, before you get into the bass and the treble. While they're all equally important, the midrange is the sound you'll be hearing the most, so it should sound the best. That's why you have to climb very high up the speaker ladder before midrange becomes a quality, and not a fault.

Simply put, bassheads aren't audiophiles. They aren't even really enjoying their music properly, since bass is a foundation for beat and rhythm, and often times not a melodic or compositionally-complex aspect of the music. It's time to look at the forest, and not just the individual trees.
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 4:51 PM Post #6 of 56

chia-pet

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
May 27, 2003
Posts
492
Likes
10
In my opinion people can favor one particular spectrum over the others, but ultimately the delicate balance of all spectrums is what gives a sound its value. To me, it's like a great dish from a great restaurant: the delicate synergistic balance of flavors and seasoning is what makes it great, not any one particular component by itself. While you may favor the metaphorical pepper (the bass) the most, it only stands out from its harmony with salt, garlic, or whatever. And you realize that if the dish were just calamary and pepper it wouldn't be nearly as good.
icon10.gif
(sigh my analogies are terrible, forgive me).

That being said, I think most people favor bass because they "feel" it as well. I personally rarely emphasize the bass, and love the entire spectrum of sound.
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 4:55 PM Post #7 of 56

Regus

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Oct 30, 2004
Posts
224
Likes
0
I gotta say personally I have started finding bass fatiguing, and I can get high on the highs so to speak, been finding my ety's very exciting lately...

Bass is very impressive in the short term, and was something you could have sold me a piece of hi-fi equipment on a year or two back - today I find a soprano or a violin gone amok far more apealing.

Might have something to do with a hearing deficiency on my left ear that means I hear very little of the lower end of the spectrum on that ear...
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 5:05 PM Post #9 of 56

Glod

1000+ Head-Fier
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Posts
1,352
Likes
10
Location
The Netherlands
Perhaps I didn't answer you question in the title of your post.

Well, I like bass as well, a lot, as a matter of fact. Am I a bass head? No, I wouldn't describe my self like that. I just want adequate bass amounts. Just enough so that I feel that this is how the double bass or the timpani's would sound in a real concert hall. And believe me, it can be wall shaking.
icon10.gif


The bass is also, IMO, important for the feeling of the concert hall it self: if the reproduction of lower tones is well done, you get a better feeling of what it is looking like: better feeling, contact and presence with, and of, the recording event.

It is a very difficult task for the source, amp and headphones. I am always looking for that effortless, controlled (actually a bit snappy) and very extended bass. IME, it is the source which is the usual bottle neck. If it cannot reproduce what you are looking for, don't bother with trying to compensate it further down the chain. However, with a good source, you can do some finer adjustments by the choice of cables, amp and of course headphones.
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 5:07 PM Post #10 of 56

PeeeMeS

1000+ Head-Fier
Joined
Jul 22, 2004
Posts
1,238
Likes
10
Quote:

Originally Posted by Aman
Simply put, bassheads aren't audiophiles. They aren't even really enjoying their music properly, since bass is a foundation for beat and rhythm, and often times not a melodic or compositionally-complex aspect of the music. It's time to look at the forest, and not just the individual trees.


basshead.gif
Eww an audiophile? I'd never want to be one of those
evil_smiley.gif
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 5:09 PM Post #11 of 56

skudmunky

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Oct 19, 2005
Posts
3,555
Likes
10
I like to hear/feel my bass, but not at a total expense of all the midrange and high. The k240 Studio allow me to do that, nice bass but the highs are still nice and crisp. Works very well for the music I listen too.
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 5:15 PM Post #13 of 56

PeeeMeS

1000+ Head-Fier
Joined
Jul 22, 2004
Posts
1,238
Likes
10
Quote:

Originally Posted by skudmunky
I like to hear/feel my bass, but not at a total expense of all the midrange and high. The k240 Studio allow me to do that, nice bass but the highs are still nice and crisp. Works very well for the music I listen too.


I don't think anyone likes bass to where they want it at the total expense of the midrange/high. That would mean 100% of the notes are bass notes!
biggrin.gif
 
Mar 23, 2006 at 5:30 PM Post #14 of 56

boodi

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Nov 19, 2001
Posts
5,741
Likes
136
Quote:

Originally Posted by Aman
Audiophiles strive for good sound, not for good types of a certain sound. Bass is most recognized because the body can actually feel the waves that bass creates - deep, punchy bass is felt when emitted, and it therefore implements more than just the sense of hearing when it is let out. This so-called "tight", "deep" bass is normally not even close to natural. An acoustic plucked upright bass does not sound like it does through those 'basshead' speaker systems.

If your quest in audio is bass, then you might as well get a 14 inch subwoofer and strap it to your head. Then you'd actually be able to enjoy only what you're wanting to enjoy and leave the rest of the music out of the picture, thereby eliminating any other distractions.
rolleyes.gif


Most audible sound in real life is in the 'midrange' category. It is thus most important to make sure those sound good, before you get into the bass and the treble. While they're all equally important, the midrange is the sound you'll be hearing the most, so it should sound the best. That's why you have to climb very high up the speaker ladder before midrange becomes a quality, and not a fault.

Simply put, bassheads aren't audiophiles. They aren't even really enjoying their music properly, since bass is a foundation for beat and rhythm, and often times not a melodic or compositionally-complex aspect of the music. It's time to look at the forest, and not just the individual trees.



Aman
I well understand what you mean and the audiophile point of view .
I consider my self still an audiophile ( but I'm trying in some way to stop it before it's too late
tongue.gif
)

My quest is not about bass ( I come from hp-2 and happy still with them as they're more neutral and balanced instruments then others , and my choice is transparency over all when I step up in the sound ladder )
My thread , in particular , is more on a popular perspective , put it in the headphone head-fi environment... why people , in the sense of the mass , is more impressioned about (good) bass response ( at first if you want ) then from refined textured articulated mids and highs
mass is stupid and not finely educated to sound ? ..maybe true for some people , but not the concrete answer about bass in the end .

Life and engagement is not about refinement , my 2c stupid pop opinion ; and refinement is probably only kind of a "top finish" on a life ; being refined ( or well educated ) doesn't mean at all being able to enjoy or not . It can help some , and it can do the opposite - bring far from joy .

I hope you get the point

[size=xx-small]The answer I agree more is cookiefactory' ( it's about physiology and chemistry )
I like bass .. people like bass .. I think that's the ( very good ) bass that links a particular deep joy from a music tune to your brain[/size]
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top