Who saw this coming?! LOL Apple Releases Software to Set IPod Volume
Mar 29, 2006 at 8:40 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 25

c0mfortably_numb

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Well lookin at my local news I saw that the Apple is releaseing an update to the IPOD volume thanks to the moron in Louisiana that didn't know how to use the volume. Here is the report

Now this is the part that really bugs me "Parents also can use the feature to set a limit on their child's iPod and lock it with a code, the company added. " If I was a kid or young teen and my parents decided how loud they think I should listen to my player I would be ticked, Ahhh but then there is always away around that with a dedicated headphone amp
smily_headphones1.gif
but how many people, teens in particular know such a device excists?
 
Mar 29, 2006 at 8:49 PM Post #2 of 25

bangraman

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I think it's a very sensible measure. Above all, kids don't know about the long-term damage blasting stuff out at even uncomfortable levels can have.


Many adults won't have a clue either, but that's a little different. I don't have any qualms with volume limiting for specific uses, but I do have problems when manufacturers cripple volume for everyone. This seems like a decent compromise.
 
Mar 29, 2006 at 9:12 PM Post #4 of 25

Jerome G

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What ? I can't hear you.
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Anyway, regarding the parental control thing, you could probably just reset the ipod to unlock it (just like the screen lock on the Nano). I'm sure that kids will figure that one out faster than their parents.
 
Mar 29, 2006 at 9:34 PM Post #6 of 25

stewgriff

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I actually took the step of downloading the update, and it's not very foolproof...
As one said before, it's only a four-digit code (unlocked easily through iTunes) between you and 115 dB.

Anyway, you simply tell the iPod what volume level you want maximum (e.g., 60%), and it sets 60% of its potential as the maximum end of the volume scale (now, 50% on the new scale=30% of potential). It's still good for self-conscious people and for little kids, though; it's useful for me, too, as I can now prevent my classmates from deafening me (twisting the volume from 20% to full while the victim has Shures in his ears...they should make this a felony...)

A real help would be if an iPod could actually tell dB levels, but that's not really possible.
 
Mar 29, 2006 at 9:37 PM Post #7 of 25

c0mfortably_numb

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Well I agree that at least they aren't crippling for everyone, It just seems like an idiotic claim. Duh I turned my Ipod up all the way for 15 hours (wouldn't it clip with those crap earbuds past half volume anyway?) now I have a funnny rinnging in my ears what do I do? I know sue Apple
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Hrmm and a label, do we really need another label? As it is I am warned not to drink Windex when I clean my windows (dunno why taste great with vodka) (j/k) I am warned when I go to get a cup of coffee that the contents are "Extremly Hot" duh ya think? Every time I pick up a bottle of beer there has to be some disclaimer about you drink, you drive, you die....Now what a sticker with some 8 year old with a hearing aid that says something like, listen to loud and you will look like me?
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Not to sound like I'm going off on a tangent its just insane, how the court will pass some ridiculos law suite like this when there is already a warning in the manual about listening at extreme volumes and it may damage your hearing.

Well I'm off to dump coffee in my lap, drink a bottle of windex, and listen to music at 115 db and think of who to sue first
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Mar 29, 2006 at 10:38 PM Post #8 of 25

trevor1189

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Quote:

Originally Posted by c0mfortably_numb

Now what a sticker with some 8 year old with a hearing aid that says something like, listen to loud and you will look like me?



Like this one seen in chem labs in schools. (It's actually a poster but your comment just reminded me of it)

IMG_bens_0_0925123106718.jpg


No kidding if you get chemicals in your eye because you don't wear saftey glasses or listen to your music too loud it is your own fault. We don't need any stupid posters or other warnings, it's just common sense.
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P.S. I am all for this idea because it could be useful for some such as me as long as it is optional.
 
Mar 29, 2006 at 10:50 PM Post #9 of 25

PeeeMeS

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This could actually be very good

For those of you who use really efficient 'phones like UE-10 Pros and can't go over 25% without blowing out your ears... this patch will give you greater control over the volume of your songs without having to do mp3gain/other stuff

You won't have to fumble with one "notch" turning the music from a little too quiet to a little too loud
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I guess we'll have to compare the options to see which method of reducing the volume has the least distortion




EDIT: Also if you listen exclusively to one set of phones(that are too loud at 90%+ volume); you might want to set the maximum volume much lower just in case cell phone interference/clumsy hands/supernatural forces turns your ipod to 100% volume
You prevent the chance of doing damage to your drivers
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Mar 29, 2006 at 10:57 PM Post #10 of 25

catscratch

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Quote:

Originally Posted by trevor1189
We don't need any stupid posters or other warining, it's just common sense.
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Common sense is dead. These days, we have courts and legislators to think for us.

This isn't such a bad idea if you have kids and have control over their iPods. However, I think you should rather educate kids about the dangers of hearing loss instead of insulting them by limiting their usable volume. This is basic reverse psychology - you limit kids' volumes, so what is the very first thing they're going to do as soon as they find a way around it or get a system that doesn't have volume limits? Blast their ears off.

Also:

This may sound cruel, but I think we should wait about 10 years until noise-induced hearing loss starts becoming a real problem and starts getting a lot of public attention. Then, the problem will resolve itself as people become aware of the dangers. Trying to persuade people that we really do know better than they do about what they're doing to their hearing is not going to work. Legislature or not, you're probably not going to alter people's listening habits, especially when listening loud has become a status symbol of sorts.
 
Mar 29, 2006 at 10:57 PM Post #11 of 25

Digitalbath3737

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So I think this is a pretty cool feature. The volume on my iPod is never over 60% (plus my files are mp3gains 89.0dbs), mainly because I have common sense and don't want to ruin my hearing. Though sometimes I accidently touch the scroll wheel and the volum goes up to the max. Defaintly not cool with iems. This is a cool little measure to help prevent that from happening. I have the max volume around 70% for when a song is awesome and must be turned up.

Anyway people who are to dumb to cut down the volume deserve to go deaf.
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Mar 30, 2006 at 12:06 AM Post #12 of 25

K2Grey

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You wouldn't need a dedicated headphone amp, Boostaroo would work fine...
 
Mar 30, 2006 at 12:16 AM Post #13 of 25

zip22

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the lawyers still aren't happy
http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/new...t-good-enough/

Quote:

"It is good to know that Apple finally acknowledges that there is a serious flaw with its iPod product, and is giving U.S. purchasers the same protection it has been giving French purchasers since 2002,” said Steve Berman, an attorney for the plaintiffs. “Unfortunately, this patch doesn’t help the millions of people who own older models—it is a jack-legged workaround that falls well short of what consumers demand and deserve.”


we deserve a volume cap, like the europeans try to avoid at all costs.
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Mar 30, 2006 at 1:02 AM Post #14 of 25

Canon

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Well I was unsure about downloading this update but when I heard about the volume limiting capabilities I decided to go for it. Like others I find 100% volume far far too loud when hit by accident.
smily_headphones1.gif


On the bright side this update actually resolved video playback problems I was having with the 1.1 firmware as well as making the menu transitions in the now playing screen less buggy (no more hitting the center button multiple times to get past the 5 star rating etc.
 
Mar 30, 2006 at 1:22 AM Post #15 of 25

ameyer17

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Quote:

Originally Posted by the iLounge article
“While the software allows users to set levels, the company does next to nothing to educate consumers about what is safe,” J.R. Whaley, another attorney representing the plaintiffs. “Many consumers would conclude that 100 DB is twice as loud as 50 DB but that’s not the case; for every 10 decibels, the loudness actually increases twofold. Fifty decibels is twice as loud as 40, 60 is four times as loud as 40, and so on.”


Nope. The actual figure is 10 times as loud. Ambulance chaser guy, you are the weakest link, goodbye.
Seriously, I don't see this as a good thing or a bad thing for iPod users.
EDIT: apparently, I'm wrong, but I still don't like that lawyer guy
 

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