Which brand of headphone is a military headphone?

Discussion in 'Headphones (full-size)' started by bbsm, Aug 3, 2004.
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  1. bbsm
    Which brand of headphone is a military headphone?
    Someone said military headphone better than audiophile headphone such as Stax omega

    Is it true?

    Where can buy military headphone?
     
  2. LTUCCI1924 Contributor
    bbsm
    HI: Welcome to head-fi. I never heard of a military headphone but being an ex Marine I use the sennheiser 595. LOL.
     
  3. Idiot MD
    I expect that question should be qualified with things like which branch of the military you're talking about and what role the headphones are used for. I suspect a sonar operator on a nuclear boomer is going to have better listening equipment than a grunt radio operator. Also keep in mind most military equipment (outside of weapons and ordnance) is usually contracted to the lowest bidder.
     
  4. DevilDog Contributor
    I spent 22 years in the Marine Corps. I wore "military" headphones for probably 8 of those years. I can't even remember the brand, but I remember they're crap, total crap.
    You can drive nails in the wall with them and they'll still work, but they're uncomfortable and they sound like crap.
     
  5. John Reeves
    Hi,

    If you e-mail Ultimate Ears they will probably do you a set in Khaki with a matching cord. LOL

    John
     
  6. Takashi Contributor
  7. Zanth Contributor
    I bet the phones used for those sonar boys in subs would be top quality. I would love to check them out.
     
  8. Jahn Contributor
    No joke - it's time someone wrote to "Mail Call." Get that Sgt. down in a sub and slap some cans on him PRONTO! And I wonder if those sub sonar cans actually have boosted freqs to listen for specific peaks...
     
  9. GWN Contributor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Zanth
    I bet the phones used for those sonar boys in subs would be top quality. I would love to check them out.




    You guys have been watching to many WW2 movies. Modern submarine tracking is more a function of a good, fast signal processor than audio cues. Good eyesight to detect minor changes in a waterfall display is more useful.

    Never served in a boomer but did spend many years overflying them as mission commander in an Aurora (Canadian P3C) aircraft. David Clark Headsets were used (confort and noise attenuation). Also worked for ten years as Director of Engineering and Programs for a company that designed underwater acoustic tracking devices and processors (sonobuoys, towed arrays and acoustic processor/recorders)
     
  10. PinkFloyd
    I've always thought military headphones looked like this: [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Zanth Contributor
    Too freakin' cool GWN. Very interesting careers you have had.
     
  12. nkd Contributor
    Actually listening is still the biggest part of submarine sonar. The computers can tell you range and direction, but you still really need a human to tell you what it is you're tracking. Software exists to identify it, but it's not particularly good, and can't replace a well trained operator.

    I was going to train to be a sonar operator before i got hit with ill health. Hopefully I'll still do it some day [​IMG]
     
  13. Claude
    Scott's Headphone Museum Gallery - Military Page (also check the main page for more vintage headphones, they all look like Grados [​IMG])


    Here are the requirements for some headphones needed by the army:

    Quote:

    The BID SCHEDULE shall be for Line Item 0800: Dual Communications Headphones (Peltor Communications/Part Number: MT15H68FB) OR EQUAL PRODUCT Quantity: 60 Each. Need hearing ability of 12-15 decibels higher than normal (82 decibels). Noise reduction to 82 decibels for hearing protection. Headphones need to attach to 148 or 117 radios (Thales Communication Part Number: AN/PRC 148 or Harris Corp Part Number: RT 1796). Needs to fit under Ballistic and Mich Helmet (Part Number: 8470-01-F01-0338). Camouflage green cups needed to match green helmets. Must be adaptable to military radio systems and military approved. Outer cup microphones combined with the electronics inside the headset to suppress and amplify in stereo 360 degrees ambient surrounding voices. Liquid/Gel filled ear seals for a comfortable fit. Slim line stainless steel headband with soft leather wrap. Two AA Battery compartment. Noise canceling microphone with water repelling filter. Easy to operate touch pad for volume control. PRICE MUST INCLUDE SHIPPING AND HANDLING.



    http://www.cbd-net.com/index.php/search/show/624522
     
  14. GWN Contributor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nkd
    Actually listening is still the biggest part of submarine sonar. The computers can tell you range and direction, but you still really need a human to tell you what it is you're tracking. Software exists to identify it, but it's not particularly good, and can't replace a well trained operator.

    I was going to train to be a sonar operator before i got hit with ill health. Hopefully I'll still do it some day [​IMG]





    Like I said never been trained as a submarine Sonar operator. Submarine operator are really tight lipped about what goes on inside the boat. You are quite right a well trained operator is essential. Notice I said signal processor and not computer. The signal processor provides you with raw data. The operator has to make the call. You are right, some automatic detection system exist but they are rather poor.

    I was trained as an acoustic officer and can tell you that the acoustic display in a P3C, a Nimrod or an Aurora aircraft can actually tell you not only what class of submarine you are tracking (boomer, diesel, attack) but can also tell you which hull type within each class and in some cases the actual hull number. The audio portion was only used when too few frequencies showed up in the waterfall display and could be confused with marine life or surface shipping. I'm talking about airborne passive tracking. We never went active. A ping could be construed as a sign of aggression plus we didn't want our presence known. In a conflict, the first thing we wanted the submariners to hear was the sound of the torpedo entering the water, after that we went active because the jig was up and we wanted to quickly reposition ourselves for a second shot.

    Zanth, it sounds more exciting than it really is. One hour mission briefings at 3 o'clock in the morning, two hours to prep the aircraft, take off at 6, on station around 8, 10 hours of tracking a boomer within its patrol box, return to base at 2000 hours, 2 hours of debrief. Go home. Do that three times a week, 10,000 flight hours later it gets pretty boring.
     
  15. ampgalore
    Aurora, isn't that the nickname for a top secret next generation aircraft that the government denies its existence?
     
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