Popular Classical Music
Feb 24, 2022 at 6:58 AM Post #7,246 of 8,744
Astor Piazzolla | Oblivion

Violin: Lelie Cristea, Piano Accompaniment: Tamilla Guliyeva & Sound Recording by Arthur Jogerst



Music: Yann Tiersen - Porz Goret & Acrobatics: Tarek Rammo & Kami-Lynne Bruin



Abel Korzeniowski - Dance For Me Wallis

Dancer & editor | Lana Lebedeva | LIGHTLANA

Production | Pavel Danilyuk


Wow!!!
Cheers CC
 
Feb 24, 2022 at 7:00 AM Post #7,247 of 8,744
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Feb 24, 2022 at 7:10 AM Post #7,248 of 8,744
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Feb 24, 2022 at 7:19 AM Post #7,249 of 8,744
Rautavaara is one of my favourite contemporary composers and I also have that album . Sad to hear about Kuusisto´s fate. This week I have been playing another Rautavaara BIS album "Angel of Light" which contain his 7th symphony with the name Angel of light ,his Dances with the Winds and another very atmospheric work Cantus Arcticus where he blends music with the sounds of Finnish/Nordic birds sounds.
I sometimes play that track as last piece before going to sleep, very nice way to wind down.
Cheers CC
Cantus Arcticus was the first piece of Rautavaara’s I ever heard. Our music teacher played it to us at school. While I do have a number of his works on CD, outside the violin concerto, I’m not sure if many other of his works have ever made a lasting impression on me. Now might be a good time to revisit some of his works, though, since I haven’t really listened to him in years, and see if I might find a new appreciation for his music.

Of the Finnish composers, Kalevi Aho has always resonated most strongly with me. I don’t enjoy all of his works by any means, but at least even his pieces that don’t click with me always intrigue and challenge me, making me eventually come back to them. I heard Jaakko Kuusisto perform a string quintet composed by Aho with Elina Vähälä and three others here in my home town back in 2015. It is titled Hommage à Schubert and pays homage to Schubert’s famous quintet (D 956), which they performed before Aho’s work. Both the piece and performance were sublime – one of my fondest memories of live music I’ve gone to hear – but unfortunately the piece seems to have yet to be committed to recording as far as my quick periodic googling has revealed. Hopefully one day.
 
Feb 24, 2022 at 8:06 AM Post #7,250 of 8,744
Cantus Arcticus was the first piece of Rautavaara’s I ever heard. Our music teacher played it to us at school. While I do have a number of his works on CD, outside the violin concerto, I’m not sure if many other of his works have ever made a lasting impression on me. Now might be a good time to revisit some of his works, though, since I haven’t really listened to him in years, and see if I might find a new appreciation for his music.

Of the Finnish composers, Kalevi Aho has always resonated most strongly with me. I don’t enjoy all of his works by any means, but at least even his pieces that don’t click with me always intrigue and challenge me, making me eventually come back to them. I heard Jaakko Kuusisto perform a string quintet composed by Aho with Elina Vähälä and three others here in my home town back in 2015. It is titled Hommage à Schubert and pays homage to Schubert’s famous quintet (D 956), which they performed before Aho’s work. Both the piece and performance were sublime – one of my fondest memories of live music I’ve gone to hear – but unfortunately the piece seems to have yet to be committed to recording as far as my quick periodic googling has revealed. Hopefully one day.
BIS has also recorded quite a lot of Kalevi Aho´s music and I like his music too.
I vaguely remember that he studied under Rautavaara?
Cheers CC
 
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Feb 24, 2022 at 11:14 AM Post #7,252 of 8,744
BIS has also recorded quite a lot of Kalevi Aho´s music and I like his music too.
I vaguely rememeber that he studeid under Rautavaara?
Cheers CC
Aho did indeed study under Rautavaara. He’s incredibly prolific and fortunately BIS has taken upon themselves to document his output as best as they can. I’m personally probably most fond of his concertos, which he has soon composed one for every instrument under the moon, from theremin to saxophone to timpani to contabassoon. While I’m typically not much of a fan of symphonies, Aho’s symphonies are among the few that actually appeal to me.



 
Feb 24, 2022 at 11:14 AM Post #7,253 of 8,744
Before people start to complain that there are too many attractive and talented women being posted here! :darthsmile:

How about this guy: - Beka Lagadze - Shubert Serenade (arr. Liszt)

 
Feb 24, 2022 at 1:18 PM Post #7,255 of 8,744
Before people start to complain that there are too many attractive and talented women being posted here! :darthsmile:

How about this guy: - Beka Lagadze - Shubert Serenade (arr. Liszt)


You teaser,
Which film is that Keira Knightley stars in here?
I only remember her from her very different roles in Pirates of the Caribean and "Bend it like Beckham"? or whatever the tilte of one of her early films actually was?
Beka Lagadze plays the Liszt arrangement of Schuberts´s "Leise flehen meine Lieder" very well indeed.
But my favourite piano solo version of this masterpiece is still Khatia Buniatishvili.
I know it has been posted here at least once before but I could not resist posting this little teaser again:.Khatia Buniatishvili - Schubert - Behind the Scenes - YouTube
Personally I still have to cheat and can only play an easier version.
I have tried playing the Liszt version but keep getting stuck and give up once things get really difficult for me.
But that melody is maybe THE most beautiful of all of Schubert´s many heavenly melodies?
Cheers CC
 
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Feb 24, 2022 at 1:41 PM Post #7,256 of 8,744
Aho did indeed study under Rautavaara. He’s incredibly prolific and fortunately BIS has taken upon themselves to document his output as best as they can. I’m personally probably most fond of his concertos, which he has soon composed one for every instrument under the moon, from theremin to saxophone to timpani to contabassoon. While I’m typically not much of a fan of symphonies, Aho’s symphonies are among the few that actually appeal to me.




Nice selection of Aho from BIS there.
But I still need a regular dose of Sibelius too.
I am currently looking forward to hear Sibelius´s 6th live with this orchestra on the 2nd of March.
My favourite recording of it is also on BIS Vänska and the Minnesota orchestra coupled with both the 3rd and 7th on one disc.
Last time I heard it live was in Singapore with Okko Kamu and the SSO.
Cheers CC
 
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Feb 24, 2022 at 2:58 PM Post #7,257 of 8,744
Nice selection of Aho from BIS there.
But I still need a regular dose of Sibelius too.
I am currently looking forward to hear Sibelius´s 6th live with this orchestra on the 2nd of March.
My favourite recording of it is also on BIS Vänska and the Minnesota orchestra coupled with both the 3rd and 7th on one disc.
Last time I heard it live was in Singapore with Okko Kamu and the SSO.
Cheers CC
I may need to check out those Vänskä + Minnesota Sibelius recordings out. I have the complete SACD set of their Beethoven symphonies. I’ve actually heard Vänskä live once, playing clarinet on Mozart’s clarinet quintet with again Jaakko Kuusisto on violin. While I’m not necessarily the biggest fan of Mozart (His music’s great, brilliant, just sounds a bit too samey, too Mozart, at times. I’m also not very fond of music in a major key, which much of Mozart’s tends to be.), his clarinet quintet is probably up there among my favorite classical works, at least from before the 20th century. The performance that evening was splendid.

Going back to Sibelius, I heard Jaakko Kuusisto conducting Sibelius’s violin concerto here in my hometown with his brother Pekka on violin. Pekka having not only been the first Finn to win the Sibelius Violin Competition (at the age of 18 or 19) but also being awarded a special prize for the best performance of the concerto did not disappoint. His tone was superb. I’m not sure if it could even be fully captured on recording let alone reproduced with true faithfulness.
 
Feb 25, 2022 at 4:26 AM Post #7,258 of 8,744
Hello Christer, yes it was the film 'Anna Karenina' starring Keira Knightley which depicts the tragedy of Russian aristocrat and socialite Anna Karenina, wife of senior statesman Alexei Karenin, and her affair with the affluent cavalry officer Count Vronsky.

I listened to this several times during the week and thought that it was worth a repost.

Dame Mitsuko Uchida: Mozart Sonatas 545, 570, 576, 533/494

 
Feb 25, 2022 at 6:14 AM Post #7,259 of 8,744
Hello Christer, yes it was the film 'Anna Karenina' starring Keira Knightley which depicts the tragedy of Russian aristocrat and socialite Anna Karenina, wife of senior statesman Alexei Karenin, and her affair with the affluent cavalry officer Count Vronsky.

I listened to this several times during the week and thought that it was worth a repost.

Dame Mitsuko Uchida: Mozart Sonatas 545, 570, 576, 533/494


Thanks ,Light-Man later last night I was thinking did she not also star in War and Peace?
Anyway I should have known it was Anna Karenina. I haven´t read the Russian Classics since my late teens and my memory of them is becoming a bit foggy. Not to mention how stiff limbed I realized I am getting nowadays, having watched those two rubber-body dancers in that fascinating video you posted .
These days I actually struggle a bit before getting up into the Bridge Yoga pose in the morning.
And that couple did so with effortless flow as part of their very sensual dance performance.That was partly why I commented with a "Wow".
Greta Garbo leaps to mind as far as classic filmed versions of Anna Karenina are concerned too.
Now I will listen to Uchida´s Mozart . I have some of her Mozart Piano Concerto recordings and also some Schubert.
Cheers CC
 
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Feb 25, 2022 at 6:58 AM Post #7,260 of 8,744
Sōmei Satō is one of my favorite contemporary composers. I believe he is largely self-taught.



 

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