OH MY G*D
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Czilla9000

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Some of you may remember the thread I posted about VDs "Speed of Light" feature being well ....um.....a false claim. VD was claiming they could accelerate electrons to the speed of light. I emailed Rick about it, and we had a nice convo.



For a bit of recap click this thread: http://www4.head-fi.org/forums/showt...threadid=19198

(Don't worry, my original post is really short)



Anyway....I go to VDs site today and what do I see....but an updated section on the Speed of Light feature:

http://www.virtualdynamics.ca/tech/Speed%20Of%20Light/


Here are some noticable excerpts:

Quote:

How does it work

Well we are not quite sure we can only speculate. We believe electrons can travel at the speed of light. The resistance will limit how close to light speed an electron can reach. By placing an acceleration field or low resistance circuit within the path of the electrons, we can accelerate the electron.


This is what VD had posted BEFORE I (and others, I don't know) emailed Rick:


Quote:

"Speed Of Light

How does it work?

Electrons can travel at the speed of light.The capacitance of a cable will often limit how close to light speed an electron can reach. By placing an Acceleration Field within the path of the electrons, we accelerate the electron back to the speed of light. This results in a great increase in the cable's power throughput.


There are a few key changes:

1. VD now admits that they can only speculate.

2. They know longer announce so "de facto"ly that electons can travel at the speed of light.

3. VD now thinks it is resistance, and NOT capacitance that limits the electron speed.


On to the next excerpt:

Quote:

I am Rick Schultz designer and inventor of this circuit. I wish to make understood that claims were made that I wish to correct at this time. SOL does not increase the speed of electrons to the Speed of Light although this may be possible in the future no circuit we have seen has achieved this yet including ours.


1. VD admits that there claims were false.

Quote:

I apologize for such a claim being made for it was misinformation. Whether electrons can reach the speed of light is speculation but we still believe it is possible.



Speaks for itself.


I think it is very cool of Rick to come out and admit he was, for the most part, wrong.

I wonder if my email convos had any impact on Rick to come out of the closet.

I wonder even more if Rick had any idea that I am 15.


I tell you, Eric and I shall rule the HIFI world......MAUAHHAHAHAHAHAHHAH!!!!!



PS: I wish to make it known that I still believe VD cables are some of the best cables in the industry, and that this is not part of a war of mine against cables.




Thanks to Rick and all.
 
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post-221657
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ian

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Good work

Interestingly enough, the average speed of electrons traveling in a conductor like copper is around the magnitude 20 cm/s. It was on one of my physics tests (physics 2 in college) and literally EVERYONE answered close to the speed of light. Theoretically that would be great, but in a conductor you have the problem of electrons bumping into other electrons. Sure they get to high speeds, but sooner rather than later they will run into another electron and get a big knock back.
 
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Czilla9000

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Thanks Ian!



I want to make it clear that I don't hate VD. Infact I just placed a bid for the Cryo Reference Cables ServingEquador is selling.


BTW... here is another interesting excerpt:


Quote:

SOL circuit is based on permanent magnetic fields and thus may create a field stronger than that of the created electromagnetic fields thus cancelling there effect.


 
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blip

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Quote:

Originally posted by Czilla9000


I wonder even more if Rick had any idea that I am 15.


I tell you, Eric and I shall rule the HIFI world......MAUAHHAHAHAHAHAHHAH!!!!!




lol. You guys are definitely getting a jump on us ancient 20-year olds that's for sure!


Congrats... I'm glad that they cleared that up.
 
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nanahachi

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*24 y/o sitting in his rocking chair, admiring those damn youngers*


nice work Czilla!
 
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Duncan

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Wow... well, if electrons really do go at the speed of light...

if a modern PC CPUs silocon square is about 1cm square... and the speed of light is 3 million miles per second (i think) then that means an electron can whizz around at maximum velocity in a CPU at (very crude and probably VERY inacurate calculations) 48,000,000,000,000 cycles per second... or 48 BILLION Ghz!

Wow... how much would Intel charge for that!


Good investigative work CZilla


...a 25 year old confined to bed, with huge bedsores... and a bedpan that needs emptying
 
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Dreamslacker

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Quote:

Originally posted by Duncan
Wow... well, if electrons really do go at the speed of light...

if a modern PC CPUs silocon square is about 1cm square... and the speed of light is 3 million miles per second (i think) then that means an electron can whizz around at maximum velocity in a CPU at (very crude and probably VERY inacurate calculations) 48,000,000,000,000 cycles per second... or 48 BILLION Ghz!

Wow... how much would Intel charge for that!


Good investigative work CZilla


...a 25 year old confined to bed, with huge bedsores... and a bedpan that needs emptying


Actually, CPU's are not limited by electron speed. They're limited by the switching speeds of the transistors in the chip and the effects of high speeds on the chips (electro-migration etc).
 
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bdb55

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Quote:

Originally posted by Duncan
the speed of light is 3 million miles per second (i think)


The speed of light is 3.0 X 10^8 meters per second

= 300,000,000 meters / sec

= 186,420 miles / sec

P.S. This isn't meant as an insult; I did a pretty similar (inaccurate, that is) calculation in the original thread about how much energy it would take to accelerate an electron to the speed of light.
 
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Squalish

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Quote:

Originally posted by ian
Good work

Interestingly enough, the average speed of electrons traveling in a conductor like copper is around the magnitude 20 cm/s. It was on one of my physics tests (physics 2 in college) and literally EVERYONE answered close to the speed of light. Theoretically that would be great, but in a conductor you have the problem of electrons bumping into other electrons. Sure they get to high speeds, but sooner rather than later they will run into another electron and get a big knock back.


I find that kind of hard to swallow. 20cm/s? That means that what you turn on an electric circuit 1 meter long, it takes 5 seconds for the current to reach the other side? I always thought(not sure where I've heard it, but there were many places) that electrons travelling in a good conductor(copper and up) went around 2/3 of the speed of light.

BTW: I don't know enough to explain a disproof, but when they talk about the "electron acceleration field" thing, my ******** meter goes off the charts.
 
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ian

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This is the actual speed of the electrons. The current is something a bit different. In a metal, the highest occupied energy level is in the middle of an energy 'band' (these there is empty 'room' in this band. If you apply a potential difference across the metal, the current exists because there are plenty of vacant levels at nearby higher energies for the electrons to 'jump' to. The conduction occurs when these electronics jump into higher energy levels within the band. This jumping occurs through the wire. Think of it this way - you push one electron into the end of the wire. At the other end, another is pushed out. This is a simplified approach. The problem with not being able to see an electron is that this stuff is hard to understand.

Needless to say 80% of my class (including me!) answered what you said. We go hurt on that exam
 
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Czilla9000

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Quote:

Originally posted by braillediver
So do holes move or do electrons move?



Another trick question by brailledriver





BOTH....depending if it is N-type silicon or P-type silicon.



 
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andrzejpw

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Quote:

I wonder even more if Rick had any idea that I am 15.


I tell you, Eric and I shall rule the HIFI world......MAUAHHAHAHAHAHAHHAH!!!!!


bah, I'm 16. You will bow down to my superiority.
 
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eric343

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Heh, very cool!


We gotta make a Team Sophomore(ic?). I'd do a logo if I wasn't so busy...


Hmm. I've got some tubular neodymium iron boron magnets stuck to my desk lamp... if I ever do some VenHaus cables, I'll put those on the ends and do a comparison review
 
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