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Is there a difference between Punk and New Wave

Discussion in 'Music' started by davidmahler, Aug 8, 2009.
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  1. donunus
    new wave I would say
     
  2. steviebee Contributor
    Hold on. Where do you fit bands like Elvis Costello & The Attractions/ Talking Heads/Television/ Modern Lovers et cetera? They were no three chord & out merchants. Back in the day (& I played in a so-called new wave, er, punk band), they emerged out of punk but were not punk: new wave, baby. Not a safety pin or tartan strap in sight...well, OK I did have a black leather jacket...and a flying helmet on one gig.

    Depeche Mode etc? Emerged as New Romantics surely? They & their ilk were the synth & keyboards guys, not the Heads, Costello or indeed if I may, the band I played in (which was a politico/dance/reggae/punk outfit, little known outside London)


    Edit\ x2 Qonmus - beat me to it! And x2 zotjen, too [​IMG]
     
  3. userlander
    I was surprised to find out reading wiki that Malcolm Mclaren was actually the one who first coined the term "new wave," apparently referring to the French new wave in cinema (Godard, Truffaut, etc.), which makes sense as the cinematic new wave was a kind of anti-establishment, DIY, low budget, etc. sensibility. So originally it seems it was meant to apply to punk itself, at least as Mclaren was trying to market it.

    I guess as more bands emerged that we now think of as "new wave" the term just started to be used more in association with those kinds of acts than to punk" bands like sex pistols, ramones, clash, etc. And then eventually it carried over to the later synth-pop kind of new wave of the 80s.
     
  4. Kees
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Qonmus /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    So what are the Talking Heads considered?



    New Wave.
     
  5. bloop
    Genres confuse me. All I know is that I like a lot that is labeled "punk", plenty that is labeled "new wave" and a fair amount of "no wave" as well.
     
  6. zotjen Contributor
    I don't know if I would consider Depeche Mode New Romantic since their sound was a little more synth based than other New Romantics such as Spandau Ballet and early Duran Duran.
     
  7. steviebee Contributor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by zotjen /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    I don't know if I would consider Depeche Mode New Romantic since their sound was a little more synth based than other New Romantics such as Spandau Ballet and early Duran Duran.



    Yes, I think you're right. Not sure what DM would have been classed as. Bleak Berlin later on maybe [​IMG] Must admit, the offerings of SB, DD, DM etc was not a music genre I ever enjoyed or particularly liked (apart from, in electronica, exceptions like Kraftwerk or Bowie's work on Low, Heroes...), so I tended to lump them all together in one amorphous mass, signposted 'Avoid'...
     
  8. Tiemen
    Punk took the rock 'n roll back to it's basics, along with pub rock (Elvis Costello, Squeeze, Nick Lowe, Dave Edmunds, Graham Parker).
    I associate New Wave with horrible slick eighties music that I hate so much.
     
  9. DLeeWebb Contributor
    New Wave was a hybrid of punk and disco. (danceable punk) I don't mean that in a bad way. To me Talking Heads was the ultimate expression of New Wave. I agree, a very underrated genre...
     
  10. donunus
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by steviebee /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    Yes, I think you're right. Not sure what DM would have been classed as. Bleak Berlin later on maybe [​IMG] Must admit, the offerings of SB, DD, DM etc was not a music genre I ever enjoyed or particularly liked (apart from, in electronica, exceptions like Kraftwerk or Bowie's work on Low, Heroes...), so I tended to lump them all together in one amorphous mass, signposted 'Avoid'...



    I say Depeche Mode started the synth pop genre following Kraftwerks roots of electronic music. They paved the way for lots of less popular synthpop bands that I also love like Red Flag, Celebrate the Nun, De/Vision, Camouflage, Cetu Javu, Cause and Effect and many more.
     
  11. Arjisme
    I think of New Wave as post-disco pop. It was the emergence of new bands that (finally!) forced disco out. Blondie, Talking Heads, Devo, The Cars. That's what I think of as New Wave.

    Punk is a simplified, raw, back-to-basics rock and roll.
     
  12. donunus
    Thats right but its more complicated than that. Weve got some pop music with a punk twist that is part of the new wave genre too (post-punk) like echo and the bunnymen or the smiths (jangle pop) for example
     
  13. DC2
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by zotjen /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    Most early New Wave definitely did not use a lot of synths. Take for example The B-52s. Then there were artists who sort of blurred the line between New Wave and Punk, such as Blondie.



    I found the the term New Wave a little confusing over the years-er decades. I guess "pretty patty B." as they used to call her(Pat Benatar) is New wave. But is Human League New Wave or just electronic? Is the Offspring Punk?
     
  14. Arjisme
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by donunus /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    Thats right but its more complicated than that. Weve got some pop music with a punk twist that is part of the new wave genre too (post-punk) like echo and the bunnymen or the smiths (jangle pop) for example



    It's always more complicated than that. Genres never neatly demarcate.
     
  15. boomana
    Attitude. Punk was attitude with force. New Wave was attitude all tidied up.
     
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