High temp BBQ grill spray paint on a heatsink?
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SilverCans

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Is it ok to spray my heat sinks with BBQ grill spray paint? Will it reduce the thermal effectiveness of the heat sink? I sort scratched them up when drilling holes in them and would like to repaint all surfaces except where the transistors mount.
 
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rickcr42

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You can tough up heat sink scratches with a black felt tip pen.Not the fine point whimpy but the fat honkers for marking BIG things
 
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SDA

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Probably, yes. Paint is much less thermally conductive than aluminum or copper, and having that between the heatsink and the air could be an issue. Why bother?
 
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mono

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It would reduce cooling effectiveness.

What I might try is thoroughly cleaning the scratched area, then putting a full-strength bleach - soaked cloth on the areas to hold a puddle of bleach over the scratched area for awhile to grow an oxide layer on it (but not TOO long) then that more-porous oxidized layer will better absorb black dye or black marker.

If you go with a marker for color you might consider a laquer-based marker like a Sharpie "Industrial" type, available at some office superstores, maybe Staples or Office Depot, Officemax, etc, in the US.
 
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Garbz

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If you have some spare $$$ in your pillow you could always go out and get them anodized black
 
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mono

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I suspect new heatsink would cost less than re-anodizing current 'sink.
 
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CPL593H

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The best touch up is flat black paint, put it in the scratch with a toothpick and lightly wipe off the excess after a minute. You'll get it right after a few tries. Just wipe it all off completely and start over if it doesn't look right after the first try.
 
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What is the heatsink coated with? If it's anodized, don't paint the whole thing since the paint won't stick well. I'd prefer a scratch touched up with either sharpie or paint over anodizing showing through flaking paint.

Regards,
Bryan
 
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Emon

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You have a few feasible options:

1. Re-anodize it yourself. Actually not that hard, do some Googling, but be careful. Toxic chemicals and high currents are involved if I recall correctly. Dying is done with RIT fabric dye usually.

2. Use a felt tipped pen to fill in the scratches. Pull it back a few feet and you'll barely see them.

3. Leave it how it is. Unless you have a window in your device (amp?) no one's going to see it, and anodizing just makes a protective layer of aluminum oxide over the surface via corrosion. It won't corrode through if you don't anodize it. It's mainly for aesthetics, especially in such low end applications.
 
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