HELP!! Amplifier descriptions
Nov 21, 2008 at 1:06 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 8

peanutbutterjam

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Hey guys, I've been wondering about this for a v long time, but despite quite a bit of searching i couldn't get a proper answer. I have 2 questions:

1. What is discrete amplification? What's the opposite of discrete amplification (as in what is NOT discrete)?

2. What is "dual mono" amplification? How is this so different from the 'normal' circuits?

Thanks!
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 1:11 AM Post #2 of 8

Tridacnid

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I'll do my best, but take it with a grain of salt.

1) Discrete uses seperate transistors, capacitors, and resistors to amplify, rather than an integrated package, like an Opamp.

2) Instead of having only two channels and one ground, the circuit uses two full sections (one channel and one ground per section) which is a balanced setup.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 1:29 AM Post #4 of 8

peanutbutterjam

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Thanks guys for your replies so far.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Tridacnid /img/forum/go_quote.gif
1) Discrete uses seperate transistors, capacitors, and resistors to amplify, rather than an integrated package, like an Opamp.


Quote:

Originally Posted by FallenAngel /img/forum/go_quote.gif
1) "Discrete" means the amp uses transistors / MOSFETs / BJTs and not monolothic IC / opamps.


Sorry i'm quite new here, what's MOSFETs / BJTs? Correct me if i'm wrong, 'discrete' means that the amplification circuit is constructed out of individual parts instead of using the DIP opamps?

But what kind of benefit would this give?

Quote:

Originally Posted by FallenAngel /img/forum/go_quote.gif
2) Dual Mono means there is a completely independent amplifier for each channel with it's own PSU.


Erm so the difference is only in the seperate PSU? What do you mean by 'independent amplifier'?

Cause in a 'normal' circuit the L/R signals have to be processed seperately anyway, so what's the difference in seperating them to 'independent amplifiers'?
 
Dec 3, 2008 at 1:11 PM Post #6 of 8

El_Doug

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Quote:

Originally Posted by peanutbutterjam /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Thanks guys for your replies so far.

Sorry i'm quite new here, what's MOSFETs / BJTs? Correct me if i'm wrong, 'discrete' means that the amplification circuit is constructed out of individual parts instead of using the DIP opamps?
But what kind of benefit would this give?



MOSFETs and BJT's are types of transistors
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You are right, discrete pretty much means no IC's used for amplification. The benefit of this is vastly higher quality components (for example, paper-in-oil capacitors) than can be put into an opamp. Better components = better sounding amp

Quote:

Originally Posted by peanutbutterjam /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Erm so the difference is only in the seperate PSU? What do you mean by 'independent amplifier'?

Cause in a 'normal' circuit the L/R signals have to be processed seperately anyway, so what's the difference in seperating them to 'independent amplifiers'?



The difference is separate PSU AND, thus, a separate ground. "Independent Amplifier" pretty much means exactly that - you could, in theory, use a miter saw to cut a "dual-mono" amp in half, and each would still work perfectly - absolutely NOTHING is shared.

This method eliminates any crosstalk between channels, as well as a few other minor problems with the two circuits sharing electrical paths - the power supply supplying imperfect amounts of power to a given channel due to the needs of the other is an example.

btw - ignore what that guy said above, dual-mono does NOT necessarily mean a balanced connection. you can just as easily have an unbalanced mono amp as you can an unbalanced stereo amp
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