Burn-in question
Nov 21, 2008 at 2:58 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 13

rakster

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I've got a stock D5000 and a KICAS amp.

Is it ok to burn-in using by home theater AVR (HK 635) instead?

Although I'd prefer it, it's logistically difficult to burn-in using my KICAS.

Thanks for answering what is probably a stupid question.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 3:32 PM Post #2 of 13

TopPop

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Not a stupid question. But the answer is yes, it will be fine.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 4:36 PM Post #3 of 13

ericj

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I find that burn-in questions typically relate to the sticky thread about burn-in in one of two ways:

Q: That thread is too long, and i'm unobservant. Is this simple obvious thing ok?

A: Obviously.

Q: I read the burn-in thread, and i have to ask, really?

A: Yes Really.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:14 PM Post #4 of 13

krmathis

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Yes, its perfectly safe.
As long as you use a matching headphone out and keep the volume down.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:21 PM Post #5 of 13

tosehee

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you can burn it any way you want to as long as you don't damage your headphone. To be safe, play at the normal listening volume or little higher. Too low would have no or little impact on burn-in.

you can do this by amp, receiver, or anything you'd like.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:35 PM Post #6 of 13

b0dhi

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No, the above are all lies. If you burn in using your home theatre instead of the other thing, your headphones will sound like crap forever. The headphones absorb the life force of whatever it is burning them in (where did you think the burn-in came from? The SKY?!), and they take on its sound. Beware.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:37 PM Post #7 of 13

tosehee

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Quote:

Originally Posted by b0dhi /img/forum/go_quote.gif
No, the above are all lies. If you burn in using your home theatre instead of the other thing, your headphones will sound like crap forever. The headphones absorb the life force of whatever it is burning them in (where did you think the burn-in came from? The SKY?!), and they take on its sound. Beware.


So, if I burn in my crappy amp with great DAC, does my amp absorb some of its nice traits from DAC? :)

dt880smile.png
wink_face.gif
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:40 PM Post #8 of 13

krmathis

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Quote:

Originally Posted by b0dhi /img/forum/go_quote.gif
No, the above are all lies. If you burn in using your home theatre instead of the other thing, your headphones will sound like crap forever. The headphones absorb the life force of whatever it is burning them in (where did you think the burn-in came from? The SKY?!), and they take on its sound. Beware.


This is certainly food for the Sound Science guys!
tongue.gif
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 8:24 PM Post #9 of 13

rakster

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This is all very funny
ksc75smile.gif
. I get it. It doesn't matter if it's burned in with a decent amp or none at all. I could leave it on for 200+ hrs connected to my ipod unamped and it will make no difference, right?
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 8:40 PM Post #11 of 13

SundayDuffer

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Thanks for the thread. I am new to this. Just bought a few cans. Burn-in process will begin tonight.

I just got some new tubes for my shanling, and a new interconnects, Will burn all three things at once.

Should i rest in between? say 24hrs...rest for 24hrs..and start it up again...til i reach 300+ hrs?

Btw, i just made a CD of whitenoise 1hr long...will this be the best sound for burning-in?
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 8:44 PM Post #12 of 13

ericj

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Generally speaking, I find claims that most headphones have major changes to their general character and tonal balance over the first few hundred hours to be somewhat specious.

I think, for example, when someone finds the bass level unacceptably low on a headphone, that this won't change enough in 1000 hours to make a big enough difference.

That if you put the 1000 hour headphone right next to one that was still in the box, and did a quick A/B test, neither would be found to be acceptable.

But over the course of 1000 hours, the owner is likely to get used to the sound signature and grow to appreciate it.

I've personally only witnessed a major change in a headphone due to burn-in, and it was a QP55x that had languished in a warehouse for 10 years before i bought it. The frequency response flattened out a bit, and it got more sensitive (louder) after I listened to it at work for 2 weeks.

But it still sounds like a QP55x, just, a little less peaky and a little easier to drive.

I think people underestimate how much their perception changes in response to the sound signature of a given headphone.

There have been people who gave it all up for a KSC75, but when i listen to my QP85 floats for 2 hours and then quickly put on my KSC75, the KSC sounds violently, evilly, corruptingly awful.

And yet an hour later, it sounds ok.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 9:10 PM Post #13 of 13

Pyriel0

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Imo the burn in process just depends on what the build of the headphone is. For instance, I just bought akg k701's which are supposed to take a long time to burn in. I did notice after 100 hours that there was more bass than when I first took them out of the box. Many people also say the treble smooths out after 300-400 hours. I just looked around online and found this: Buy AKG K 701 Headphones online at Gigasonic.com

"Varimotion Ultra-precision Two-layer Diaphragm
The K 701 has an all-new diaphragm that continues the evolution of the K 1000's multi-layer design. Advanced production technology combines two different materials: the first optimizes diaphragm motion, while the second dampens undesirable breakup modes. AKG 's patented Varimotion technology varies the diaphragm's thickness: the 80 ?m center zone is virtually pistonic for well-balanced, undistorted HF response, while the highly-elastic 40 ?m perimeter handles the increased excursion required for accurate midrange and solid bass reproduction."

I think its just the diaphragm that needs to break in, not the driver itself. The diaphragm being thinner on the outside for bass would explain the shorter break in period to get more bass + loud bass thumps would naturally move it more. The thicker part for high frequency would explain the 300-400 hours for highs to smooth out because it won't be moved around/broke in anywhere near as fast.

I put mine in a drawer with t-shirts wrapped around each side and put the volume a bit(a good bit) higher than what I listen to them with. I have rock and rap cranking through them with the foobar equalizer low+high freqs turned up to break in the diaphragm faster. I have some Panic Attack/Liquid Tension Experiment, Slipknot, Bullet for my Valentine, Muse, Tool/Perfect Circle, Underoath, Snoop Dogg, NERD and Outkast playing so I'm probably breaking them in a bit rougher/faster than most people.
 

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