or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 384

post #5746 of 16802

@ ljokerl

 

 

i am skeptical about the W4s that it may bore me.. my ex1000s will be my main go-to iem.. i am just looking for a different sound on the BA realm.. i thought about the ck100, SM3, 535 but then i always end up thinking about the um3x because of its superb instrument separation and that all around the place headstage..

 

would you agree that the um3x will be fine for me as my back up for my ex1000s? i thought the W4 would do the same thing as my ex1000s does but just lesser highs and lows so i thought i just killed it for me haha..

 

i only listen to my music very simple

ipod classic 2009>ex1000

i'm not fond of amping and other stuffs ..

 

 

thank you

post #5747 of 16802

Hi All,

 

very new to all this. I posted on the portable amp forum and they directed me over here. I was looking to improve the sound out of my Shure se215's but was told I would be better off, getting better IEM's than going to an amp, at least with what I've got.

 

for the most part I listen to jazz, funk, blues, rock, but also some electronica, punk, ska. To give you an idea , when previewing stereo gear my go-to cd's / albums are Stanley Turrentine - "Cherry" (Japanese version) Stanely Turrentine " Don't Mess with Mr. T" and Papa Mali' "Do Your Thing".

 

Listening to various genre's I tend to like accuracy - if it's bassy I want to hear that, but if it's a more mellow track I want to hear that too.

but not too much of it - I had Klipsch S4's and found them too bright, too much high end not enough of everything else. Then I had some Thinksound TS02 which I liked better , but not the fit; I could never get them to seat right and they tended to pop out of my ears when the cable got the slightest tug. While the bass was better it was a little muddled and separation wasn't great. The Shure's I find to be pretty good, but still the bass doesn't have the clarity that I like. What I did like about the Shures, is the way they fit, a pain to get in right but once there every comfortable.

 

I was recommend the GR07 and the TF10 over at the portable amp forum as the seeming most go-to IEM's on these forums.  My budget is in the $200 range, but I would go as high as $300 if it really made a difference. Can you recommend any other IEM's I should be looking at? any and all help is appreciated. thanks

post #5748 of 16802

ljokerl,

 

Really intrigued by the CTM-200. I got a good deal on the W4R (let's assume sonically the same as the W4) but am thinking about entry level customs. You gave the CTM-200 a 9.6 and the W4 a 9.4, both very high scores. What does each possess sonically that is stronger than the other? What led you to give a slight sonic edge to the CTM-200?

 

Thanks for your time, as always!

post #5749 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by tao1 View Post

Hi All,

 

very new to all this. I posted on the portable amp forum and they directed me over here. I was looking to improve the sound out of my Shure se215's but was told I would be better off, getting better IEM's than going to an amp, at least with what I've got.

 

for the most part I listen to jazz, funk, blues, rock, but also some electronica, punk, ska. To give you an idea , when previewing stereo gear my go-to cd's / albums are Stanley Turrentine - "Cherry" (Japanese version) Stanely Turrentine " Don't Mess with Mr. T" and Papa Mali' "Do Your Thing".

 

Listening to various genre's I tend to like accuracy - if it's bassy I want to hear that, but if it's a more mellow track I want to hear that too.

but not too much of it - I had Klipsch S4's and found them too bright, too much high end not enough of everything else. Then I had some Thinksound TS02 which I liked better , but not the fit; I could never get them to seat right and they tended to pop out of my ears when the cable got the slightest tug. While the bass was better it was a little muddled and separation wasn't great. The Shure's I find to be pretty good, but still the bass doesn't have the clarity that I like. What I did like about the Shures, is the way they fit, a pain to get in right but once there every comfortable.

 

I was recommend the GR07 and the TF10 over at the portable amp forum as the seeming most go-to IEM's on these forums.  My budget is in the $200 range, but I would go as high as $300 if it really made a difference. Can you recommend any other IEM's I should be looking at? any and all help is appreciated. thanks

Hey Tao, 

 I agree, I don;t think that a portable amp will do it for you. I listen to alot of the same as you, and find the GR-07 do these fine. One question however is, how do you find the highs on your Shure 215
 

 

post #5750 of 16802

Has anyone ever heard or listened to this IEM?

 

TEAC inCore ZE-1000 Hi-Definition In-Ear Stereophones

 

http://www.amazon.com/TEAC-inCore-ZE-1000-Hi-Definition-Stereophones/dp/B00162XSZK/ref=pd_sim_e_100

 

31140HuCfAL.jpg

post #5751 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niyologist View Post

Has anyone ever heard or listened to this IEM?

 

TEAC inCore ZE-1000 Hi-Definition In-Ear Stereophones

 

http://www.amazon.com/TEAC-inCore-ZE-1000-Hi-Definition-Stereophones/dp/B00162XSZK/ref=pd_sim_e_100

 

31140HuCfAL.jpg


I've been wanting to know about them myself because I can't find any reviews on them anywhere.  Its a dual BA so I wouldn't think it would be all that bad but with no reviews it makes me wonder.

 

post #5752 of 16802
Not sure if it's mentioned earlier in the thread, but for what it's worth, I just bought the Meelec M6P as a backup and the standard accessories are slightly different on mine. You mention only "single-flange (3 sizes) and small silicone tri-flange tips"... so I'm sure that they just changed what they include since 2009 when you reviewed them.

Mine came with a pair of large tri-flange, a pair of small tri-flange, a pretty wide pair of biflanges, and then three sizes of single flanges. (And to my mind they all suck, glad I ordered a set of Comply foam ones to go with it).

Thanks for the detailed reviews though. I decided on getting this pair as a backup based on your review, and while it's a little bass-heavy for my liking, I couldn't be more happy with it as a cheap backup set.
Edited by jhoff80 - 1/23/12 at 4:10pm
post #5753 of 16802

Just thought I'd add to the Atrio M5 (MG7) review - it seems Joker may have used the wrong tips in his original review.

He lists the "Shure Olives" as the recommended tips but I have to argue strongly against this - they utterly ruin the sound stage by bloating the bass and destroying the speed and clarity of the highs.

 

Would be very interested to see his opinion revised using the stock foam sleeves provided with the Atrios as they sound much better to my ears.

post #5754 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post


Good to see you around! Lucky I'm still fixated on portable audio or this would get even more expensive.


Your saying of portable being the lesser of two evils is correct. However the components stay there for much longer. I've had my dac and amp on my desk for a long time and they are not going anywhere soon. Headphones for the most part have been more stable than when I was big in portable where I would buy and sell every other week. 

 

However it definitely is very expensive if you want to get a good full sized. I used to think twice about something costing 300+ and just the other day I bought something costing that and didn't blink twice.

 

 

I'm glad this thread is still kicking and alive. I'm sure it continues to help a lot of people. However one advantage of full sized esp the more popular ones is that they are more likely to show up in meets where you can get an idea for yourself.

 

post #5755 of 16802
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanuka View Post

 

@joker
 
 when you mention you use the trimmed-meelec with crystal, which ones do you use (for which meeled model)?
 
tnkx
 
 


M6 large triple-flange, top flange (the smallest one) cut off. Turns them into very soft bi-flanges with a medium-size bore. I like them on quite a few earphones.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by soullinker20 View Post

@ ljokerl

 

 

i am skeptical about the W4s that it may bore me.. my ex1000s will be my main go-to iem.. i am just looking for a different sound on the BA realm.. i thought about the ck100, SM3, 535 but then i always end up thinking about the um3x because of its superb instrument separation and that all around the place headstage..

 

would you agree that the um3x will be fine for me as my back up for my ex1000s? i thought the W4 would do the same thing as my ex1000s does but just lesser highs and lows so i thought i just killed it for me haha..

 

i only listen to my music very simple

ipod classic 2009>ex1000

i'm not fond of amping and other stuffs ..

 

 

thank you


The UM3X does have excellent separation but it is not at all out-of-the-head as the EX1000/IE8/FX700 and many other dynamic-earphones can be. Even the W4 and SE535 provide a larger headstage. It's a bit difficult to explain but if you get the chance to audition it next to the EX1000 it'll make sense. 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by tao1 View Post

Hi All,

 

very new to all this. I posted on the portable amp forum and they directed me over here. I was looking to improve the sound out of my Shure se215's but was told I would be better off, getting better IEM's than going to an amp, at least with what I've got.

 

for the most part I listen to jazz, funk, blues, rock, but also some electronica, punk, ska. To give you an idea , when previewing stereo gear my go-to cd's / albums are Stanley Turrentine - "Cherry" (Japanese version) Stanely Turrentine " Don't Mess with Mr. T" and Papa Mali' "Do Your Thing".

 

Listening to various genre's I tend to like accuracy - if it's bassy I want to hear that, but if it's a more mellow track I want to hear that too.

but not too much of it - I had Klipsch S4's and found them too bright, too much high end not enough of everything else. Then I had some Thinksound TS02 which I liked better , but not the fit; I could never get them to seat right and they tended to pop out of my ears when the cable got the slightest tug. While the bass was better it was a little muddled and separation wasn't great. The Shure's I find to be pretty good, but still the bass doesn't have the clarity that I like. What I did like about the Shures, is the way they fit, a pain to get in right but once there every comfortable.

 

I was recommend the GR07 and the TF10 over at the portable amp forum as the seeming most go-to IEM's on these forums.  My budget is in the $200 range, but I would go as high as $300 if it really made a difference. Can you recommend any other IEM's I should be looking at? any and all help is appreciated. thanks


I don't think the GR07 or TF10 will give you the bass you want - not compared to TS02s or S4s or even SE215s in some ways. You might like the Atrio MG7. It's got pretty clean bass and most if it is deep bass, with no mid-bass bloat. Also the Radius DDM or maybe JVC HA-FX500.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by imackler View Post

ljokerl,

 

Really intrigued by the CTM-200. I got a good deal on the W4R (let's assume sonically the same as the W4) but am thinking about entry level customs. You gave the CTM-200 a 9.6 and the W4 a 9.4, both very high scores. What does each possess sonically that is stronger than the other? What led you to give a slight sonic edge to the CTM-200?

 

Thanks for your time, as always!


Mostly space - the CTM200 has a large, out-of-the-head headstage while the W4 is only above average, though still very good. I also think the W4 isn't quite as flat as the CTM-200 - it seems a touch more mid-centric in comparison while the CTM-200 is maybe just a hair v-shaped. The W4 does have slightly better note thickness. Neither has fantastic dynamics IMO.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by jhoff80 View Post

Not sure if it's mentioned earlier in the thread, but for what it's worth, I just bought the Meelec M6P as a backup and the standard accessories are slightly different on mine. You mention only "single-flange (3 sizes) and small silicone tri-flange tips"... so I'm sure that they just changed what they include since 2009 when you reviewed them.
Mine came with a pair of large tri-flange, a pair of small tri-flange, a pretty wide pair of biflanges, and then three sizes of single flanges. (And to my mind they all suck, glad I ordered a set of Comply foam ones to go with it).
Thanks for the detailed reviews though. I decided on getting this pair as a backup based on your review, and while it's a little bass-heavy for my liking, I couldn't be more happy with it as a cheap backup set.


I've changed the accessory listings for the MEElec stuff a few times since 2009 but they keep changing. I'll update the M6 accessories again - thanks. The only tips I really like are the triples with the top flange trimmed off. The single-flanges are okay but don't work well on any other earphones and even on the M6 Sony Hybrids are better. The bi-flanges are weird in shape and rigidity.

 

post #5756 of 16802
Thread Starter 

Added Koss KEB70 and Sunrise Aodia i100

 

 

 

Quote:
(3B31) Koss KEB70

Koss KEB70 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Jan 2012

Details: Aluminum-shelled in-ear from Koss
Current Price: $25 from amazon.com (MSRP: $44.99)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 100 dB | Freq: 15-20k Hz | Cable: 4' I-plug
Nozzle Size: 5mm | Preferred tips: generic single-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (2.5/5) - Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes) and soft carrying pouch
Build Quality (3.5/5) – The machined shells of the KEB70 look and feel very sturdy but are attached to a thin, tangle-prone cloth cable that has a tendency to fray. Strain reliefs are a bit hard and there is no cable cinch. L/R markings can be tough to see
Isolation (3.5/5) – Quite good
Microphonics (4/5) – Surprisingly low in the cloth cable
Comfort (3/5) – The shells are smooth and rounded at the front but slightly heavy in the ear. Long strain reliefs and lack of a cable cinch can make over-the-ear wear tricky. The stock tips are strange – short and thick

Sound (5.4) – The KEB70 is a budget-minded earphone with a consumer-friendly sound signature. The low end offers sizeable mid-bass lift with moderate sub-bass extension left over. The deep bass is not emphasized as it is with the MEElectronics M9 and tends to be subdued slightly by the mid-bass hump of the Koss but the low end is decently clean and controlled on the whole. The bass tends to be a little slow but not smeared – just a bit ‘fat’. The midrange is warm and surprisingly detailed for an entry-level product. It is placed just behind the mid-bass in emphasis but not quite as recessed as that of the M9. The M9 is clearer and more neutral in tone but not as smooth as the KEB70.

At the top, the KEB70 is laid-back and slightly rolled-off. There are no significant spikes to cause harshness or sibilance. The M9 has similarly mediocre top-end extension but tends to be harsher and grainier. The KEB70 sounds slightly darker, however, and lacks a bit of detail and resolution in comparison. In terms of presentation, the Koss offers surprisingly decent layering and space, sounding reasonably open but not very airy due to the laid-back treble. The soundstage has good width but not much depth – par for the course as far as budget-minded in-ears go.

Value (8/10) – At the current sub-$30 prices, Koss offers a good-sounding budget earphone with surprisingly solid shells in the KEB70. There are a number of minor quirks that might cause one to think twice before picking one up in place of a MEElec M9 or other established entry-level earphone but the smooth, impactful sound is well worth the price of admission.

Pros: low microphonics; smooth and pleasant sound
Cons: poor stock eartips; heavy; tangle-prone cable


Thanks to kidcharlemagne for the KEB70 loan


(3B32) Sunrise Aodia i100

Sunrise Aodia i100.jpg
Reviewed Jan 2012

Details: Entry-level headset in the common Sennheiser CX300 form factor
Current Price: $23 from lendmeurears.com (MSRP: est. $23)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: N/A | Sens: N/A | Freq: N/A | Cable: 4' I-plug
Nozzle Size: 5.5mm | Preferred tips: stock single-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (1.5/5) - Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes) and shirt clip
Build Quality (3/5) – Plastic housings are fairly well put together. Standard Sunrise cabling with metal hardware feels nice and sturdy but probably isn’t. A bit of driver flex is present
Isolation (3.5/5) – Moderate with the conventional straight-barrel housings
Microphonics (3/5) – Bothersome when worn over-the-ear; decent otherwise
Comfort (4.5/5) – Tiny, lightweight housings seemingly identical to those used by the Sennheiser CX300 disappear when worn. Easy IEMs to sleep in

Sound (6/10) – Sunrise’s entry-level headset model, the i100 utilizes a conventional sound signature – boosted bass with relatively balanced mids and highs. The bass is full and impactful, with good depth and power. There is a bit of mid-bass emphasis but nothing overblown – the Soundmagic E10 is easily bassier, for example. Bass control is good – not as impressive as with the higher-end Sunrise sets but only a touch on the boomy side considering overall the bass quantity of the i100.

The midrange is warm and pleasant. It tends to be a bit dry but clarity and detail are quite good - a bit better than with the ECCI PG100, for example, but not quite on-par with the Soundmagic E30. In terms of emphasis, the midrange is a half-step back compared to the bass but not particularly out of balance compared to the mid-recessed MEElec M9 or mid-forward Fischer Audio Jazz. The treble transition is smooth – the top end is not perfectly even but sparkle is minimal and it is balanced well with the midrange. Top-end extension is average and with its copious bass the i100 is slightly dark on the whole next to more balanced sets such as the E30 and MEElec CX21. The presentation is agreeable – soundstage size is average but has depth in addition to width and the separation is good – better, for example, than with the MEElec M9s and ECCI PG100s.

Value (8.5/10) – The Sunrise Aodia i100 is a well-rounded entry-level headset, scoring points not only for sound quality but also good long-term comfort and above-average isolation. The consumer-oriented sound signature is rather well-executed, with punchy, robust bass, warm mids, well-controlled treble, and a decent presentation. The generic build and moderate cable noise would be problematic in a higher-end set, but can be excused considering he price of the i100. Those looking for a cheap and cheerful way to listen to music and take calls on the go will get their money’s worth.

Pros: Lightweight and comfortable; easy-going sound
Cons: Generic housings; cable can be noisy

 

 

 

post #5757 of 16802

Hello everybody,

 

Just take a look please:

 

Fake Brainwavz Betas from MP4nation (?!)

Thanks!

post #5758 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freefallr4545 View Post

Hey Tao, 

 I agree, I don;t think that a portable amp will do it for you. I listen to alot of the same as you, and find the GR-07 do these fine. One question however is, how do you find the highs on your Shure 215
 

 

In general the Shure se215's are pretty good, but they do have issues; I've find the bass to be to muddled, the mid's lost and the high end distorts. It's fairly decent for rock, but whenever I pay jazz or any piece with a lot of treble in it I get distortion, might be my source, but I don't hear it on either my home stereo speakers (snell J-III's) or on my computer (swan M200MKII's).

 

It's why I have been looking for more accurate IEM's. Don't want to go too accurate though then it's as if the music has lost all feeling, looking for that perfect compromise. hah. I guess I am looking for the best of all worlds. When I talk about bass though I want the clarity of a stand-up bass not the thump, thump of a synth
 

 


Edited by tao1 - 1/24/12 at 6:15am
post #5759 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post


M6 large triple-flange, top flange (the smallest one) cut off. Turns them into very soft bi-flanges with a medium-size bore. I like them on quite a few earphones.

 



ljokerl, do you think the trimmed Meelec triple flange would be good on the FTX90?  I'm currently using the small triple flange (not trimmed) and it seems to work well, isolates a good amount and sound doesn't seem different than the stock tips.  Also, you mentioned biflanges as a preferred tip for the FXT90 - could you be more specific?  I see you didn't mean the Meelec biflanges, which is good because they're much too big for my ears.  Thanks!

post #5760 of 16802

Hey joker, this is truly a great piece of work. Thanks a lot.

 

 However, I wonder why you dont´t do reviews of high end IEM first , like sony EX600, Ultimate Ears Triple.Fi 10..., because most members here probably don´t care about 30$ IEMs.

 


Edited by Kaffeemann - 1/25/12 at 1:27am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106)