would like to know dB level of my headphones
Mar 20, 2006 at 4:57 PM Post #46 of 56

needmoretoys

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Quote:

Originally Posted by hehe
So the headphone has an effect on the output of the amp or soundcard.
I thought electricity was simpy emited like light so you see why i would not expect an amp to make a difference then.
If 75percent of the soundcard is the best then i need an amp to lower te volume.
I just thought an amp was used to increase the volume...
smily_headphones1.gif



If your soundcard has no significant distortion or clipping at 75%, then you may not notice much difference. Most amplifiers, and I will assume those in soundcards also, will distort or clip with the volume setting near their maximum. In these cases using an amp with the soundcard set at a lower level will improve the sound greatly.
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 5:01 PM Post #47 of 56

needmoretoys

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Originally Posted by hehe
http://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/~jw/hearing.html

I can still hear the 16khz pretty good, but it hurts more than i hear it.
I put it about 30dB higher than 3khz and its still not as loud but because of the way it feels i rather not put it higher.
I hear 8khz a lot louder than the other ones around there also, could this be because of a peak in my headphone response?
30hz i need to put almost all the way up to hear (with my level in windows set to around 90dB i think).
Im just wondering what others get?



It could be that your headphones have a 8 kHz peak, but I find the 8 kHz range to be irritating and it is perceived as louder than 1 kHz.
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 5:04 PM Post #48 of 56

hehe

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Quote:

Originally Posted by needmoretoys
If your soundcard has no significant distortion or clipping at 75%, then you may not notice much difference. Most amplifiers, and I will assume those in soundcards also, will distort or clip with the volume setting near their maximum. In these cases using an amp with the soundcard set at a lower level will improve the sound greatly.


Well maybe he meant 75% of the dB value
icon10.gif

75% seems like a strange amount since if it is percentage of pressure it would be less than 2dB from the maximum?
Maybe windows sound level uses a different scale?
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 5:11 PM Post #49 of 56

hehe

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Skylab
I needed 6db more loudness at 16kHz to hear it the same as the rest. With my DT770's, I had no trouble hearing 30Hz very strong, same as 1kHz.


http://www.jimprice.com/prosound/db.htm

That first graph shows everyone's ears are supposed to be less sensitive in the low frequencies.
Unless you were listening at 90+dB its strange you hear 30hz at the same level.
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 5:15 PM Post #50 of 56

Skylab

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Not with the DT770's it's not
orphsmile.gif


And I can only say it was about the same -- I did not measure it of course, just listened.
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 9:44 PM Post #51 of 56

rgoodnight

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Skylab
Keeping it at 80db or under is a good idea. I have my various amp/headphone combos calibrated to be right at 80dbA with the loudest music I play.


Good advice Skylab, but I'd be even more conservative and say that if you plan to listen for hours on end (i.e. at work), 80dbA is still a bit too high. I have moderate/mild tinnitus (and plan to keep it that way - mild that is) and I find it gets much worse and more annoying if I listen for more than a few minutes at 80db+.

I think investing in a RadioShack SPL monitor is a great investment. I have one and use it quite a bit both on cans and speakers to make sure I am not overdoing it.
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 10:32 PM Post #52 of 56

GreatDane

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Quote:

Originally Posted by hehe
Is that 92 the maximum your computer can do?
Are both the windows setting and the player at the highest?
I would expect it to be much higher.



I see that you been enlightened with many good replies. Learning about this stuff is half the fun.

I've never subjected my DT-880 to my PC, I don't think it would sound very good compared to my Woo Audio 3 tube amp which is what was driving the 880 in that pic. My listening is not computer based...only ripping for my DAP and other related stuff is done there.
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 10:36 PM Post #53 of 56

Chri5peed

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Quote:

Originally Posted by K2Grey
The goal is to do these two things without changing the sound itself.


I don't know about that. An amp probably shouldn't add a lot of artificial colourisation.

An unamped system might be giving you 60% of the potential SQ. Adding an amp might boost this to 80%. So there may well be a huge change in sound, better frequency response for one...
An unamped headphone might well be a completely different beast when its served with a better signal.

So whether an amp adds its own brand of sound is probably another one of those subjective audiophile things. A good way to tell is seeing if a can which is easily driven sounds the same with an amp?
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 10:37 PM Post #54 of 56

Skylab

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The other thing ALL my amps add, which I find critical for really enjoying headphone listening, is a crossfeed circuit.
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 11:32 PM Post #55 of 56

Chri5peed

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Skylab
The other thing ALL my amps add, which I find critical for really enjoying headphone listening, is a crossfeed circuit.


Whats that do then? I know it mixes the channels a bit.

I like extreme channel seperation in headphone music.
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 11:50 PM Post #56 of 56

Skylab

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Chri5peed
Whats that do then? I know it mixes the channels a bit.

I like extreme channel seperation in headphone music.



Crossfeed gets rid of that "between your ears" feeling of headphone listening, and brings the stereo imaging forward a bit. Subtle, but highly effective. If you want to know more, go to Meier Audio's website (link at top of page) -- great description there.
 

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