Wire Stripping / Wire tinning
Mar 9, 2004 at 12:57 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 21

eyevancsu

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I started to think ago about how you guys strip and tin your wires when making amps or other electronics. I usually strip wires with some nice and small nail clippers i got at walgreens. I misplaced my actual wire strippers one day and had an amp to build, so i found the next best thing, and found that the nail clippers are so so much better and faster than the dedicated strippers. Does everyone just use the good ol' strippers?

Also, i get so tired and annoyed at tinning the wires with my iron, it causes the solder on it to oxidise(i dunno how to spell this word...) so much quicker than regular. I was thinking of going over to frys and picking up one of their solder pots, and was wondering if its better and quicker this way, or ...

-ivan c.
 
Mar 9, 2004 at 4:47 PM Post #3 of 21

tangent

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Quote:

Does everyone just use the good ol' strippers?


There are many kinds of strippers, some better than others.

The kind with an irregular cog thing that you turn to set the wire diameter, and has two V notches is junk. They nick the wires, and the diameter dial is always moving out of its set position on you.

The kind with several fixed-size round holes is better. The difference among the grades is accuracy and ergonomics. I use one of the better ones of this type, and I've not wished for anything better.

There are fixed-gauge wire strippers that do only one gauge and do it quickly and accurately. This kind is probably best for assembly line work.

At the top end of the scale are the automatic wire strippers which you just stick a wire into and squeeze the handles. I don't know how well these work. I observe that the prices range from $20-100, though, so probably they aren't all equal.

Quote:

it causes the solder on it to oxidise so much quicker than regular.


Who cares if the solder oxidizes? It's the conductor you care about -- the solder is protecting the conductor.
 
Mar 9, 2004 at 8:43 PM Post #4 of 21

groggory

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Quote:

Originally posted by tangent
At the top end of the scale are the automatic wire strippers which you just stick a wire into and squeeze the handles. I don't know how well these work. I observe that the prices range from $20-100, though, so probably they aren't all equal.


My friend has a pair of these. Unless you're sure they're good, they suck!!!!!!!!

I mean like pitiful. His are a bit old and the clamp that holds the wire while you're stripping slips and you end up with a wire with just messed up insulation.

-------

Personal favorite

Klein Tools
Cat # 11046
16-26 AWG
klein.jpg
 
Mar 9, 2004 at 8:58 PM Post #5 of 21

fiddler

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Teeth work pretty well if you're in a pinch.
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Well no, don't try teeth on teflon, that stuff's too tough to bite off in my experience. This is probably the one and only advantage of PVC.
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Ok seriously now. I have one of those strippers with the two V notches Tangent mentioned, actually works the best for me. I also have a cheap one of those automatic strippers, works reasonably well for thick cables (i.e. taking the jacket off a coax cable, etc.) and while it can deal with fine wires with PVC, it's no good with teflon, and it just scratches the insulation making it even harder to strip. Maybe the more pricey ones are better. At any rate, this type is bulky too, so they're no good if you need to get into tight places.
 
Mar 9, 2004 at 10:04 PM Post #6 of 21

chosen1

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I have to secont groggory here. Being an electrician I am kind of partial to Klein tools, but beyond that they are the best I've used for small stuff.
 
Mar 9, 2004 at 11:01 PM Post #8 of 21

PeterR

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I use this one, works great.
1240200.jpg

When I forget where I put it, these pliers with integrated stripping holes come in handy:
1301160.jpg

Of course I'm pretty disorganized, but with some practice you're pretty fast with this as well:
Seite2_4.jpg

And if all else fails, this is always in my pocket:
1-3713.jpg
 
Mar 9, 2004 at 11:44 PM Post #9 of 21

john_jcb

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The best wire strippers that I have used were thermal ones that melted the insulation and never nicked the wire. You need a fan or a hood to keep the fumes away though.
 
Mar 11, 2004 at 6:16 AM Post #12 of 21

Ebonyks

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For teflon insoluation, i've always just used a pair of siscors. It works great on wires like 89259. Otherwise, teeth (ala fidler, and if you can't get teflon off, you're not trying hard enough
wink.gif
) Or, on PVC or polyethaline, a hot soldering iron is usually enough to get a clean conductor, the dieletrics just melt away.
 
Mar 11, 2004 at 9:42 AM Post #13 of 21

fiddler

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Quote:

Originally posted by Ebonyks
For teflon insoluation, i've always just used a pair of siscors. It works great on wires like 89259. Otherwise, teeth (ala fidler, and if you can't get teflon off, you're not trying hard enough
wink.gif
) Or, on PVC or polyethaline, a hot soldering iron is usually enough to get a clean conductor, the dieletrics just melt away.


I have wimpy gums.
redface.gif


Melting PVC smells naaaaaaaaaasty tho..
 
Mar 12, 2004 at 11:02 PM Post #14 of 21

hottyson

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I use a Stanley knife to cut around the wire. I then grip at the cut area with miniature wire cutters. Then it is just a pull up and it is a perfect strip with no loss of copper conductor.
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Mar 13, 2004 at 1:57 AM Post #15 of 21

Sal

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I've been using this pair for years and they were handed down to me from my father's tool box.

They may not look pretty, but with a little practice, you can strip anything from thick to thin gauge without nicking the wire. I've had brand new ones of that style, but none of them seem to strip as well as this old pair. I guess it just shows that a good tool can last a lifetime.

wire_strippers.jpg
 

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