Which metal adhesive?
Nov 24, 2008 at 5:45 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 11

Navyblue

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Which of the followings is considered the best adhesive for metal?

- epoxy
- siliconne
- solder (the kind that we use on PCB)
- hot glue

Any other suggestion (except those involving torches or furnace)? I'd like to avoid bolt and nuts too for aesthetic reason.
 
Nov 24, 2008 at 5:58 AM Post #2 of 11

JamesL

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J-B Weld
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Nov 24, 2008 at 6:04 AM Post #3 of 11

holland

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what to what? metal to metal...JB Weld (certain type of epoxy). Other to metal, or just general, contact cement. I use Household Goop. It works well. JB Weld will pretty much be permanent, and it's downright nasty to remove if the surface is prepped properly and cured. You'll need a grinder.
 
Nov 24, 2008 at 6:10 AM Post #4 of 11

JamesL

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Hot glue definitely isn't strong enough..
Solder doesn't wet to aluminum. Definitely doesn't wet to paint and plastic. I'm not sure about steel.
Silicon's no good.
Some epoxy's work.. some don't. I've tried a few "metal epoxies" that just doesn't provide enough mechanical strength to be reliable enough.
J-B weld is very good from my experience, but nothing's as good as bolt and nuts.

The other good thing about nut&bolt is that it's not permanently attached. You need a wide, flat surface area for epoxies to work.

I've come across some punch-type nails and welders, but they're quite pricey.
 
Nov 24, 2008 at 6:47 AM Post #5 of 11

Navyblue

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I'll be sticking stainless steel to the head of a bolt. The bolt would probably be steel, I don't know if I can get any brass or stainless steel bolt. Thus contact area is pretty small.

I could use a puddleful of whatever adhesive to increase contact area and submerge the bolt head in it, if that would help.

A little unconventionally, I have access to asphalt, which sticks to most things.
biggrin.gif


As you guys probably realised, I have never heard of JB weld, and not sure if the local hardware stores carry them. Time to do some research.

The objects that I am going to stick is for aesthetic purpose and not for structural support. I don't need it to be superb but I don't want it to fall off after getting a knock either.
 
Nov 24, 2008 at 8:12 AM Post #7 of 11

-=Germania=-

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I will go ahead an say JB Weld epoxy as well. I have used it to install a Clebesh Strap on my french horn about 7 years ago. Still going extremely strong and conveniently able to take it off later with a heat gun down the road.
 
Nov 24, 2008 at 1:07 PM Post #9 of 11

Navyblue

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Thanks guys.
smily_headphones1.gif


I was at the hardware shop and there was no JB Weld. I almost bought the epoxy clay, also almost bought the rivetter. But in the end my vanity prevail and I got myself some 3M extra heavy duty adhesive tape.
biggrin.gif
I figured since the picture I hung with 3M stuffs has been on the wall for more than a year it would last at least as long, and even if it falls off years later I'd stick it back again.
 
Nov 24, 2008 at 2:35 PM Post #10 of 11

JamesL

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Navyblue /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I could use a puddleful of whatever adhesive to increase contact area and submerge the bolt head in it, if that would help.

The objects that I am going to stick is for aesthetic purpose and not for structural support. I don't need it to be superb but I don't want it to fall off after getting a knock either.



If it's not for structural support, it'll do fine. Puddling the epoxy will only make the job messier. You want a thin layer of epoxy, and you want as much contact area between the two surfaces(it helps if you sand them flat, and also if you have some kind of weight press down on it as it cures).
 
Nov 24, 2008 at 3:50 PM Post #11 of 11

holland

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JB Weld .... auto parts store....you don't want this on a part that's finished (polished aluminum, for example) as removing it may scar the finish. You have to heat to over 500F, or grind.

Hardware stores have the 30 second, 1 minute, 2 minute, 5 minute epoxy. Hardware stores (and Target) also have Household Goop...which is a good general purpose contact cement.
 

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