Typical headphone cable capacitance?
Mar 25, 2006 at 1:10 AM Post #2 of 14

Garbz

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
May 19, 2004
Posts
3,573
Likes
12
won't be more the a few pf. But it changes from cable to cable.
 
Mar 25, 2006 at 1:15 AM Post #3 of 14

kin0kin

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jan 4, 2005
Posts
2,804
Likes
12
yeah just asking for an average possible number. but how much is a few pF?
biggrin.gif
the kimber ICs have an average of around 30-50pF (yeah i know it's and IC and they are braided). Safe to say a 3M long cable has about 20pF capacitance?
 
Mar 25, 2006 at 2:00 AM Post #5 of 14

kin0kin

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jan 4, 2005
Posts
2,804
Likes
12
Quote:

Originally Posted by DaKi][er
I've never measured, but I was thinking it could be up around 100pF


not impossible.....I suppose kimber's 30+pF is "pretty good" to be able to retail them at their price.
 
Mar 25, 2006 at 2:03 AM Post #6 of 14

jcx

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jul 24, 2002
Posts
2,371
Likes
368
google cable capacitance pF/ft

range is <10 - >50, eyeball average ~20 pF/ft so 20 pF total C is optimistic by an order of magnitude for 3 meters

high flex cable will have wires close together but use skinny wire, separation to diameter ratio controls parallel wire C (and dielectric const of insulation of course)
 
Mar 25, 2006 at 2:22 AM Post #7 of 14

Garbz

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
May 19, 2004
Posts
3,573
Likes
12
well capacitance is by far not the only quality indicator. Infact some awesome cables have horrible capacitance measurments. What do you need the data for?
 
Mar 25, 2006 at 3:16 AM Post #9 of 14

jcx

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jul 24, 2002
Posts
2,371
Likes
368
Mar 25, 2006 at 4:56 PM Post #13 of 14

tangent

Top Mall-Fi poster. The T in META42.
Formerly with Tangentsoft Parts Store
Joined
Sep 27, 2001
Posts
5,969
Likes
56
Quote:

Originally Posted by kin0kin
I was not aware that the capacitance of the cables is almost around 500pF
eek.gif



Yes, I've seen this myself. It's one reason high-power op-amps are so popular for audio: they're often made to have high output currents precisely so they can drive heavy capacitive loads easily.

By the way, your "at 20 kHz" qualifier above isn't necessary. The capacitance is the capacitance. Changing the frequency you measure at only makes your measurement job harder, since it's easier to test capacitance at higher frequencies. You can talk about the impedance at a particular frequency, but that's a separate issue.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top