turntable interconnects needed
Mar 19, 2002 at 9:03 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 4

redshifter

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i have a large denon turntable, and i need to hard wire some new interconnects to it.

what kind of cable should i use for
- audio interconnects
- ground wire
?

also, can anyone direct me to a website or some information on how to calibrate denon turntables (it is model dp27f or something.. i'll look it up tonight); info like setting the tonearm height, etc.?

also, are there any inexpensive record cleaning machines worth getting?
 
Mar 19, 2002 at 9:04 PM Post #2 of 4

Ross

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Van den Hul make a phono cable (I think its D501) which is very good and quite cheap (and has its own ground cable). Check out their website for details.

Ross
 
Mar 19, 2002 at 9:34 PM Post #3 of 4

redshifter

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thanks ross, i'll check it out.

what i'm really needing is advice on the type of cable used: is it a regular audio interconnect, or do i need one that has a specific resistance, etc.? also, can i use speaker wire (zip cord) for the ground, or does it also need to be something specific? i will be soldering the cable to the tt.

i'm just planning on heading to radio shack for these cables after work. my analog rig is definity "mid-fi" compared to some. at this point anything more than that is overkill.
 
Mar 20, 2002 at 2:01 AM Post #4 of 4

KurtW

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Regular audio cables will work as long as it has a good shield, as you're dealing with a very low level signal. Also, the capacitance of the cable will affect the sound. I assume you have a moving magnet cartridge. These are usually designed to be loaded with 47k ohms resistance which your phono input will provide, so the wire resistance isn't significant. If you liked the sound the way it was, you might want to try to not vary the capacitance of the cable too much from what you had. For coax type cable, a rough idea can be gained by the diameter of the cable, so you can match the new one to the size and length of the old one. Ground wires are usually fairly small gauge but it shouldn't have to be.
 

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