Trying to get into hi-fi
Jul 5, 2016 at 12:21 PM Post #31 of 40

PL4Y3R 0N3

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It can because bluetooth is not lossless. However, if you are using APTX with bluetooth, that's very high quality compressed audio. Although from what I understand, still lossy.


Beats claims the studio wireless has APTX but I've seen a few people say it doesn't. I don't know, how could I find out?
 
Jul 5, 2016 at 12:35 PM Post #32 of 40

cel4145

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I would imagine if their website says it, then they probably do. It's licensed compression method for audio for use with bluetooth. I would think APTX would sue them if they weren't paying the license for the technology, and why would they pay if they weren't going to implement it?
 
Jul 5, 2016 at 12:59 PM Post #33 of 40

ProtegeManiac

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Quote:


New question: how much does Bluetooth affect audio quality? I usually use my headphones wirelessly but would that affect audio quality majorly?

 
Even AptX doesn't have the complete bandwidth for lossless like FLAC, but if you're streaming a 320kbps file, it will technically be lossless in that there are no losses as its bandwidth can handle that with no problems.
 
Either way there are other bits involved in the audio chain that have a bigger impact than just BT bandwidth and losses. If you're using a BT headphone, there's the question of how close to flat the drivers are, and that assumes the amplifier in the BT circuit isn't struggling driving it. If you're using a BT dongle, then there's the problem of how good its DAC and amplifier are, especially when you hook up a relatively hard to drive headphone, or in some cases, the impedance might actually be too low.
 
Personally though I only use BT when I'm streaming to some convenient system in a non-critical listening situation (ie I won't need to sit properly relative to the two separate speakers), like grilling out in the yard and we just take turns using our own phones to control the music coming out of Bose water-resistant (ie we clumsily hope it's beer- and cow "blood"-resistant) speakers, and in this situation there are no downsides to BT. We're not listening critically, the speaker doesn't need a lot of power if it can sit in the middle of the table (and can survive toppled beer bottles and rare beef dripping on it), each phone has a Spotify account or local storage and it works like how we used remotes before (except back then I'd have to walk up to the window and hit "Next Disc," only to realize that the dad's 300-disc changer's catalogue has errors). Anything more private and/or critical than searing a porterhouse rare while Slayer's "Reign in Blood" plays in the background as a joke, I skip wireless, primarily because I don't mind wires when I'm not dealing with tongs, fire, and meat, and certainly not to the point of having to sacrifice quality of the other components (again, BT itself isn't the problem) vs my preferred high sensitvity IEMs for example. Even when jogging I'd rather deal with getting a new cable on an ergonomic-fitting IEM than dealing with batteries on BT headsets.
 
Jul 5, 2016 at 1:21 PM Post #34 of 40

PL4Y3R 0N3

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Even AptX doesn't have the complete bandwidth for lossless like FLAC, but if you're streaming a 320kbps file, it will technically be lossless in that there are no losses as its bandwidth can handle that with no problems.

Either way there are other bits involved in the audio chain that have a bigger impact than just BT bandwidth and losses. If you're using a BT headphone, there's the question of how close to flat the drivers are, and that assumes the amplifier in the BT circuit isn't struggling driving it. If you're using a BT dongle, then there's the problem of how good its DAC and amplifier are, especially when you hook up a relatively hard to drive headphone, or in some cases, the impedance might actually be too low.

Personally though I only use BT when I'm streaming to some convenient system in a non-critical listening situation (ie I won't need to sit properly relative to the two separate speakers), like grilling out in the yard and we just take turns using our own phones to control the music coming out of Bose water-resistant (ie we clumsily hope it's beer- and cow "blood"-resistant) speakers, and in this situation there are no downsides to BT. We're not listening critically, the speaker doesn't need a lot of power if it can sit in the middle of the table (and can survive toppled beer bottles and rare beef dripping on it), each phone has a Spotify account or local storage and it works like how we used remotes before (except back then I'd have to walk up to the window and hit "Next Disc," only to realize that the dad's 300-disc changer's catalogue has errors). Anything more private and/or critical than searing a porterhouse rare while Slayer's "Reign in Blood" plays in the background as a joke, I skip wireless, primarily because I don't mind wires when I'm not dealing with tongs, fire, and meat, and certainly not to the point of having to sacrifice quality of the other components (again, BT itself isn't the problem) vs my preferred high sensitvity IEMs for example. Even when jogging I'd rather deal with getting a new cable on an ergonomic-fitting IEM than dealing with batteries on BT headsets.


Well I'm sure that beats designed the amp to be able to drive the headphones properly, but I understand Bluetooth reduces quality. I just wanted to know to what extent it would affect the audio quality.
 
Jul 5, 2016 at 2:03 PM Post #35 of 40

ProtegeManiac

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Well I'm sure that beats designed the amp to be able to drive the headphones properly, but I understand Bluetooth reduces quality. I just wanted to know to what extent it would affect the audio quality.

 
Like I already explained, unless you're using a music file whose size (or bit depth) cannot be handled by BT, then there's no degradation in sound quality. You're more likely to run into audible distortion due to the drivers' inherent response or the amplifier distortion in the BT receiver.
 
As with Beats specifically, at the very least the first (driver response) would be a problem, but I wouldn't dismiss amplifier distortion either considering how even with larger amplifiers with larger batteries, power supplies (including caps, whether it's battery or socket powered) can still get into audible enough distortion.
 
Jul 5, 2016 at 2:16 PM Post #36 of 40

Mr Makarov

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If coming from Beats I would strongly recommend getting Denon AH-D600, you can now get them very cheap and they are a noticeable upgrade compared to Beats headphones (very good bass, big soundstage for a closed can, very good clarity, extended highs), and they do not need an external amp. First thing you will notice is that sound is just bigger, clearer and detailed.
Also Sennheiser Momentum is a good choice and you can find the 1st model for less than 200.
Another option is Philips Fidelio X1 or X2 - they are very bassy, clear sounding and very comfortable but they are open-back (so everyone will hear your music) and they are very big and strange-looking when worn so is a no go if you plan to use them on street.
 
Jul 5, 2016 at 2:36 PM Post #37 of 40

JBal4

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These all work well with no amp

AKG - K550/K551/K553 around $100used/$130new
the good = detailed, fairly neutral, over ear, very nice bass extension
the bad = the fit can be problematic(they require a good seal for bass extension), can be a bit bright(improves after 100 hrs burn in)

Denon - D600 around $180used/250new
the good - impressive bass impact and extension, highs have nice sparkle without being bright, comfort(pillows on your ears)
the bad - these are big cans(i use them with headband all the way up), bulky

V Moda - M80 around $65used
the good = no fatigue, bass in impactful and clean, pleasant mids, great build quality
the bad = highs are rolled off


Vocab-
bright is treble emphasis
rolled off is opposite of extended both refer to frequency response
burn in(controversial topic) = break in most just plug headphones in and let pink noise or tunes play overnight
 
Jul 5, 2016 at 3:08 PM Post #38 of 40

3xclu5ive

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These all work well with no amp

AKG - K550/K551/K553 around $100used/$130new
the good = detailed, fairly neutral, over ear, very nice bass extension
the bad = the fit can be problematic(they require a good seal for bass extension), can be a bit bright(improves after 100 hrs burn in)

Denon - D600 around $180used/250new
the good - impressive bass impact and extension, highs have nice sparkle without being bright, comfort(pillows on your ears)
the bad - these are big cans(i use them with headband all the way up), bulky

V Moda - M80 around $65used
the good = no fatigue, bass in impactful and clean, pleasant mids, great build quality
the bad = highs are rolled off


Vocab-
bright is treble emphasis
rolled off is opposite of extended both refer to frequency response
burn in(controversial topic) = break in most just plug headphones in and let pink noise or tunes play overnight

Even though these can be ran without an amp, I'm sure these can be brought to their full potential with a DAC Amplifier. The Creative SoundBlaster E1 for $60 is a great amp and DAC and quite efficient headphones do get deafening loud when you put it at max volume compared to how small it is.
 
Jul 5, 2016 at 3:32 PM Post #39 of 40

PL4Y3R 0N3

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Wow. This thread suddenly blew up! Thanks for all the help. Feel free to put more suggestions, I'd live to hear more about headphone terms, any info is much appreciated.
 

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