Review: Cleer DJ Professional DJ Headphone
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moedawg140

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Review: Cleer DJ Professional DJ Headphone
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Introduction
 
It was a brisk day in a suburb of Chicago, Illinois.  I attended AXPONA, which is the Audio Expo North America.  The meet operates very much like T.H.E. Show Newport, located in Irvine, California - an expo show where they showcase not only 2-channel speaker setups, but have dedicated headphone and earphone audio rooms as well.  While I was in the “Ear Gear Expo”, which is a ballroom full of headphone and earphone electronics, a representative of Cleer, the VP of Marketing: Amber Bobin, walked around with the Cleer DU (review, here) and the Cleer NC (review, here) in her hands.  I’ve never seen any Cleer products before and saw these two headphones and thought “okay, cool, I know they are headphones...but how are they?”  

Cleer's VP of Marketing, Ms. Bobin
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I asked Ms. Bobin, “The headphones look nice, may I have a listen?”  
 
Ms. Bobin replied, “Sure!”  
 
I put the DU on first, and said “This sounds good...how much is this going for?”  
 
Ms. Bobin replies “$129”.  I respond, “Wow, that’s a really good sound for a really good price!”
 
Then, I tried on the NC.  “Pretty good”, I thought to myself.  
 
As soon as Ms. Bobin turned on the ANC feature...I smiled from ear to ear.  “Whoa, almost all of the noise around me has subsided!  Sounds great, too!  How much is this headphone going for?”
 
Ms. Bobin replies “299”.  I respond, “For the price, this is a very good headphone.  Great job!”
 
I then move to the DJ.  I say “This headphone is pretty cool, I could see how DJ’s could like this.  Also, the lights are really cool, and I like lights!”
 
I thank Ms. Bobin for the Cleer DJ as a complimentary review sample. Upon researching Cleer, I found out a few tidbits about the company that further solidifies my thoughts of the young organization.  If you’d like to find out more, follow me in our journey!

 
Audio equipment used in the review
 
Headphone
Cleer DJ Professional DJ Headphone: $399.99
 
Headphones compared
Cleer BT Bluetooth Wireless Headphone: $199.99
Cleer DU High Definition Dual-Driver Headphone: $129.99
Cleer NC Noise Cancelling Headphone: $299.99
Fostex & Massdrop TH-X00 Mahogany (modded): $399.99
Master & Dynamic MH30: $329
Master & Dynamic MH40: $399
Sennheiser Momentum 2.0 AEi: $349.95
 
Sources
iPhone 6 (Space Gray, 128GB):  $849.99 or $399.99 with a 2-Year Contract
MacBook Pro: Starting at $1,299
Microsoft Surface Book: Starting at $1,499
Pioneer DDJ SZ Professional DJ Controller: $1,999
Questyle Audio QP1R Golden: $899 USD
 
DAC/Amp
iFi Audio micro iCAN SE: $299
 
Software Applications Used
Spotify Premium – Extreme Setting
TIDAL HiFi – Lossless
 
 
Thanks for the interest!  I have been a music aficionado since first listening to greats such as Anita Baker and Michael Jackson in their glory years.

An avid wrestler, coach, teacher and mentor, I like to immerse music lovers in headphones, earphones and sources that do nothing but make the listeners smile.

Ringing in my ears?  Oh, tinnitus?  I get that about 2 times a year, for about 10 seconds each time.  Other than that, I’m currently good to go with regards to my hearing.  Even if my hearing is perfect or not so perfect, what I hear may or may not match what you hear, for a multitude of reasons (genetic, physical, psychological, age, etcetera).

My music preferences are anything that has a great beat to it, not too vulgar in nature and anything that can induce head-bobbing, toe-tapping and maybe even dancing if the mood is right.  I normally listen to (alphabetically): Alternative, Classical, Hip-Hop, Indie, Popular/Top Hits, Rock, and R&B/Soul.  I will even from time to time listen to Blues, Jazz, Modern Electronic, Retro/Classics, and World.

Measurements - I measure headphone output dB with my decibel measurer app that anyone can download, replicate and have an instant reference with what I use to test.  Frequency spectrum measurements are seldom posted, as the manufacturer’s measurements are usually the best guidelines to go by.  Why?  They use them to tune their equipment, and it’s from their own specific parameters.  I completely agree with Ken Ball from ALO’s statement/post when it comes to frequency response measurements (verbatim):

“…I thought it might be good to post some frequency response measurements first before we see a lot of variations posted by people. Without going into a long drawn out thesis / debate on measurements I just want to say that I have not seen any reviewers measurements that are accurate and it can be difficult to interpret a freq measurement. I don't use HRTF compensation curve on my measurements because I am familiar with the raw freq curve so when I see a curve I know what it sounds like and am comfortable with what I am seeing. So to state my measurement so I can be happy that this is the official freq I am posting it here now. I do not really want to get into any debates on what the freq means or read into it too much as a freq measurement is only a very small part of the over all picture of the product. I would MUCH rather listen to the IEM than read a freq.

In addition, I dont want to sound like I dont welcome people to also have fun and measure, but just want to say that taking a accurate measurement is tricky, also tricky to read into the measurement. I spent over $15,000 on on measurement system and it took me almost a year with professional help to calibrate and set it up 100%. So in doing so it is expensive and can be difficult to set up and calibrate. I know my set up is accurate because I send my IEMs to independent labs to double check everything.”

Measurements are valid to possibly get a glimpse or gist of what we are hearing, but measurements are not the end all be all.  Various manufacturers have told me privately that even though it may measure flat, it may not sound flat.  Also, measurement devices do not equal our brain and cannot measure with absolute 100 percent certainty with regards to what we hear and feel.  I listen with my ears, and write based on my interpretations of the music that is being presented to me.

A wise man once told me: "Music is the only thing that doesn't have war, pestilence, garbage, crap - music is so general, it's such a beautiful canopy of peace."
 
 
Company information
 
Upon researching Cleer, I found out a few tidbits about the company that further solidifies my thoughts of the young organization.
 
I found out that not only they have only headphones as part of their product line, but Cleer has only started as a full-fledged company in 2015.  The solid build, comfort, flexibility, engaging LEDs and technological features such as the PASC are well implemented.  More about this later.  The Cleer creed is all about:
 
Passion For Sound
 
“Music lovers have high expectations when it comes to sound, they are looking for quality audio products to unbox their favourite music. Cleer’s sound and acoustic team is responsible for the research and development of the best-in-class audio products to provide you with a truly authentic listening experience.”
 
Design Craftsmanship
 
“The Cleer’s product design aesthetics are sleek and contemporary.
 
Cleer’s products are made of high-quality build materials which not only give premium look and feel but also contribute to the product performance. The ergonomics design coupled with lightweight materials to better fit your head with maximum comfort even hours of wearing.”
 
Innovation in Technology (edited)
 
“Cleer is committed for excellence in acoustics, our team creates and drives new technological ideas and innovations in the acoustic and sound field. We reproduce studio sound through our innovative sound technology.”
 
As of this writing, Cleer, Inc. recently appointed Patrick Huang as its new global President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO).
 
Before being appointed, Mr. Huang was an executive (GM for Sony Digital Imaging) for Sony Electronics, Inc. for 11 years.  He also worked as SVP of Operation and Supply Chain for I AM Plus Electronics.
 
Suffice to say Mr. Huang has all of the credentials to take the Cleer company to the next level of their goals if Mr. Huang and company continues to produces fantastic products.
 
 ​

 
 
Here's my review of the Cleer DJ Professional DJ Headphone in video form (view in YouTube on your browser to jump from mentioned section to mentioned section [table of contents]):
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Here's my DJ family friends video of Mr Modina, JMo and Jerrick using the Cleer DJ during their DJ session!
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Here's my DJ family friend Mr Modina holding it down during his DJ session, using the Cleer DJ!​
 
 
Pictures from the DJ session at Dirt Dog in Las Vegas, NV!​
 
  
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Inside the box
 
  
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When you open up the box, you’ll receive:
 
  1. Cleer DJ Professional DJ Headphone
  2. Cleer hard carrying case
  3. USB charging cable
  4. 6.3-3.5 mm adapter
  5. Two audio cables with inline remote (1.2m)
  6. DJ cord cable 1.2m (extend to 3.3m)
  7. Quick start guide
  8. User manual
  9. TIDAL 30 day complimentary trial (19.99 USD value)
  10. A Certificate of Acoustic Calibration with measurements
 
  
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Build and aesthetics
 
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The DJ is subtle in design, but can turn into a mind of its own if you let it.  Before we get into the DJ’s mindset, let’s talk about other aspects of the headphone.  The eco-friendly pleather headband is extra plush and very comfortable on the head.  The DJ’s earcups are made out of magnesium alloy and have a matte black with a chrome-brushed look to the sides of the earcups as well.  The circumaural (over ear) design is oval in design and gives good clearance to my ears and is a closed-back design.  The earpads are made out of leather and allow good depth of the ears as well.  Inside of the headband and earpads are an L and a R to easily distinguish which side of the headphone is which.  The DJ headband can twist so the left or right earcup can rest on either side of your forehead - also, the DJ can fold to fit in bags, the supplied case, etcetera.

The DJ also has detachable audio cables that connect to its left or right earcup, and work with Android, Apple, and other devices as well.  There is a supplied DJ cord cable that also utilizes a locking mechanism so the cable won’t have any chance of possibly unplugging for any unforeseen reason.  
 
  
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The earpads are also changeable/replaceable - taking off the earpads is as easy as a simple twist, and off each one goes.  The two remote cables are black, flat, have a nice rubberized feel, don't tangle easily, and have a nice and slim right angle for their audio jacks as well.  The DJ cord is made very well, is thick with an integrated recoil effect as well, with well implemented strain relief and a collar on the jack to lock into DJ or studio monitoring equipment if need be.  The cables are no frills and subtly elegant, that fit the devices I've connected the cables to with ease.  

 
Fit and comfort
 
The DJ fits comfortably on my head - with different LED color lights​
  
 
The headphone provides very good contact with the top of the head as most of the radius of my head has contact with the leather of the headband.  The 335 grams of the DJ are distributed well, and can wear the DJ for hours without much issue, and it weighs less than the 395 grams of the Cleer sibling NC.  I don’t feel the weight on my head too much, so that’s a welcome facet of the headphone.  What helps out is that the headband is soft and comfy, clamp strength is not very tight, and earpads are sufficiently squishy and plush as well.  One caveat is that the DJ doesn’t have headband adjustability vertically, only in a twisting manner - shouldn’t be a concern with fit and comfort if you don’t have a very small or very large head, as the DJ didn’t seem to have issues with fit and comfort when I exhibited the headphones at various audio show meet-ups.  The earpads are comfortable, and I don’t have an issue with regards to increasing warmth as the headphone is used for extended listening sessions.  Overall the fit and comfort very good to my head and ears.
 

Function and mindset
 
The DJ contains a rechargeable battery for both the LED and the internal processor.  The DJ has an LED light-up red “C” logo on each earcup, and can be turned on or off.  Another press of the LED button and you’ll see the DJ has multi-color LEDs that pulse to the beat of the music that’s flowing through the headphone.  Another press of the LED button and it turns off the LEDs.  My favorite LED setting is the multi-color, as it is pleasing to the eye, albeit eye-catching, for sure.
 
The DJ contains a switch for mono or stereo sound, and a switch to turn on or off PASC™.  Here’s some info about PASC™:
 
“OFF”
The battery is not engaged, and works passively.
 
PASC™ (Psycho-Acoustic Spectral Compensation)
 
According to Cleer:
 
“Human ears hear less bass frequency at low sound levels than at high sound levels. Bottom-end bass frequencies usually get lost when the volume is set at a low level.
 
To counteract this deficit, PASC™ (Psycho-Acoustic Spectral Compensation) sound technology inside the digital signal processor can boost the bass levels by emphasizing the bass content of the music. So Cleer headphones recall the true bass sound at low and high volume levels enabling you to enjoy consistent sound, regardless of the volume setting.”
 
What does this mean to me and what do I think this means to you?
 
The PASC™ switch sounds like a bass boost switch is activated, and boosts the overall sound/volume of the headphone as well, similarly to an external headphone amplifier, except this acts like a built-in amplifier.

 
Power to drive the DJ
 
The DJ is pretty easy to drive, as a smartphone such as the iPhone for reference doesn't take full volume for the DJ to emit levels that can damage hearing pretty quickly.
 
Volume set when it starts to get loud with the iPhone 6:
 
11 out of 16 volume clicks for PASC™
12  out of 16 volume clicks in “OFF” mode)

 
Disclaimer and hearing factors
 
The DJ sound impressions are mainly for anyone wanting a point of reference regarding how they more or less pair with the iPhone 6, QP1R and Surface Book.  Other sources may vary slightly or greatly as the DJ sounds different enough with these three sources to warrant mentioning.  The DJ will have a warmer and pronounced effect in the overall bass region when pairing with the iPhone 6.  The DJ will have a detailed with slight treble and bass with extended detail when paired with the QP1R.  The DJ will have a more balanced and natural sounding approach to its presentation when paired with the Surface Book.
 
We all hear differently, and our experiences with regards to how our interpretation of what we hear vary greatly.  Some factors that come to mind (and not limited), are:
 
Your inner ear and skull’s overall composition: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/the-unique-vibrations-of-your-skull-affect-how-you-hear-music-654940/?no-ist.
 
Hearing loss as we age, also known as presbycusis: https://www.ohio.edu/news/months/nov1998/111.html,https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presbycusis.
 
Heredity, noise trauma, dietary habits, smoking, hypertension, atherosclerosis, are other factors that affect people’s overall hearing ability.
 
 
Analyze this and that
 
The test tracks that I use in my reviews are located in these albums (album alphabetical order)
 
1989 (Deluxe Edition) by Taylor Swift (FLAC 44.1kHz/16bit)
21 by Adele (FLAC 44.1kHz/16bit)
Bad (2001 Special Edition) by Michael Jackson (FLAC 44.1kHz/16bit)
Bangerz by Miley Cyrus (MP3 320kbps/44.1kHz/16bit)
Beyoncé by Beyoncé (FLAC 44.1kHz/16bit)
good kid, m.A.A.d city by Kendrick Lamar (FLAC 44.1kHz/16bit)
Heart Blanche by Ceelo Green (MP3 320kbps/44.1kHz/16bit)
Hybrid Theory by Linkin Park (FLAC 48.0kHz/24bit)
Make Yourself by Incubus (MP3 320kbps/44.1kHz/16bit)
No. 5 Collaborations Project (EP) by Ed Sheeran (MP3 320kbps/44.1kHz/16bit)
One by One by Foo Fighters (FLAC 88.2kHz/24bit)
Random Access Memories by Daft Punk (FLAC 88.2kHz/24bit)
Schubert Berliner Philharmoniker by Nikolaus Harnoncourt (FLAC 48.0kHz/24bit)
The Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd (FLAC 44.1kHz/16bit)
Thriller by Michael Jackson (DSD 2822.4kHz/1bit)
X (Wembley Edition) by Ed Sheeran (FLAC 44.1kHz/16bit)
 
Several standalone tracks (track alphabetical order)
 
Dock of the Bay by The Persuations A Cappella Dreams (WAV 44.1kHz/16bit)
M.O.R. by Blur – Blur 21, Blur (2012 Remaster – Special Edition) (MP3 320kbps 44.1kHz/16bit)
Schubert String Quartet No. 14 in D minor D. 810, Death and the Maiden: III. Scherzo. Allegro molto by Oslo String Quartet – The Schubert Connection (DSD 2822.4kHz/1bit)
Serenade (Spanish Dance), Op. 54, No. 2 by Jano Starker and David Popper – Wilson Audio Ultimate Reference (APE 44.1kHz/16bit)
The Peppery Man by Natalie Merchant – Leave Your Sleep (WAV 44.1kHz/16bit)
These Bones by The Fairfield Four – I Couldn't Hear Nobody Pray (WAV 44.1kHz/16bit)
 
If I am listening to a product that is not able to be listened with the highest resolution tracks that I have mentioned, I will listen to the TIDAL versions (FLAC).

 
Sound impressions
 
The DJ embodies a warm with a bright sound, a V-shaped sound is what I hear.  The sound is full, but a little thin, when compared to the PASC™ mode, which is more rich and thicker in sound.  The DJ has bass, but is not fully realized until the PASC™ mode is activated, which acts as a bass boost of sorts - ups the midbass considerable.  The sound without PASC™ enabled is adequate but not necessarily audiophile quality - however, with PASC™ enabled, you hear more enveloping and rich sound, with bass that is sure to please -- if you are into a lot of bass.  Midrange is smooth with adequate texture, especially with PASC™ enabled, and treble extends far but is below the area that I would say is sibilant - none of the sort.  The spatial capabilities are that of an intimate nature - everything is in front of you or in close proximity.  Depth and weight are the spatial strong points - when PASC™ is activated.  Vocals are front row and center, with a laid-back tone when PASC™ is off and more vibrancy when PASC™ is activated.  When it comes to the overall sound, neutralists need not apply, but for those that want a headphone that is great for mixing, mastering and DJ’ing, the DJ is a great headphone to work with and jam!
 
 
iFi Audio micro iCAN SE

 
The micro iCAN SE is an amp that produces a defined and resolute sound signature, especially when coupled with the QP1R.  Detail is palpable, and the macro detail of the DJ shines.  The "3D HolographicSound" setting helps add in a little more forward, rich and transparent sound field perception.  iFi Audio explains: "3D HolographicSound recreates a holographic sound field like listening to a pair of speakers."

Here's the 3D HolographicSound settings:
- = Direct
●●● = 3D for flat sounding recordings.
● = 3D for recordings with excessive stereo effect.

I only need to turn the volume dial a little (to around 9 o' clock) to obtain a comfortable listening level.  The micro iCAN SE also features a Bass Boost switch, called "XBass".  iFi Audio explains: "XBass was uniquely-designed to extend the bass response to suit different headphones."

Here's the XBass settings:
- = Direct
●●● = For bass shy headphones.
● = For average bass headphones.

XBass is my favorite setting on the amp because I can immediately hear and feel a change in the bass response (increased volume of bass, texture and decay).  

The one dot setting is the setting most would be most comfortable with, and three dots turns the DJ into a super basshead headphone.   A little more bass is apparent, but is still not bassy enough to my ears, as the one dot setting is best for average bass headphones.  The DJ is in my opinion a bass heavy headphone (especially when PASC™ is activated), and would benefit the best with using the one dot setting, or no dots at all for those that are searching for a less bassy presentation.

 
Headphone comparisons
 
Before I start with the comparisons; I have listened to a lot of audio equipment, but I haven't listened to everything.  If you request a comparison and it's not listed in my profile and hasn't been reviewed, then there is a chance that either I haven't listened to it in a long while and don't want to compare by memory, or I don't have the requested product(s) with me to compare.  Consider being proactive by sending me a PM (private message), sending me the headphone(s) and/or sources, IEMs, etcetera, you would like for me to compare, and I'll add it to the review (or any review that I've written).  If you don't have the requested product(s) with you and I don't have the requested product(s) with me, chances are slim that I will be able to fulfill your request because I always like to A/B with audio equipment that's immediately on-hand.
 
Cleer BT Bluetooth Wireless Headphone

 
A difference between the DJ and the BT is that the BT has Bluetooth capabilities and that it is lighter in weight.  This is pretty much where the DJ takes over as having a more rich sound signature compared to the laid-back nature of the BT, more options such as PASC™ (Psycho-Acoustic Spectral Compensation), which is basically the equivalent of a built-in amp that amplifies the bass as well as the rest of the frequency spectrum you are listening to.  The DJ has also got some snazzy side-logo multi-color LED lights that dance to the beat of the music, can be set to stay red, or can be turned off.   The DJ has a warmer sound than the BT, but soundstage and imaging is better implemented with the DJ.  You’ll want to go with the DJ if you want a bassy (not basshead, but really close), and the BT if you want a laid back sound and long for Bluetooth to be a part of your listening experience.

Cleer DU High Definition Dual-Driver Headphone

 
There is more of a bassy emphasis with the DJ, and when you switch the PASC™ on, you’ve got got the equivalent of a built-in amp that amplifies the bass as well as the rest of the music you are listening to.  The DJ has got some snazzy side-logo multi-color LED lights that dance to the beat of the music, can be set to stay red, or can be turned off.   The DJ has a warmer sound than the DU, but soundstage isn’t very different from each other.  You’ll want to go with the DJ if you want a bassy (not basshead, but really close), and the DU if you want a balanced sound that has more extended treble in comparison to the DJ.

Cleer NC Noise Cancelling Headphone

 
The DJ is lighter in weight than the NC, and has more flexibility with the headphone as it can swivel if you want to listen to only one side of the headphone.  The sound of the NC and DJ are pretty similar when no electronic modes are involved.  The NC has more full bass, midrange and treble, and is more intimate in sound than the DJ, but the difference isn’t too apparent.  When the ANC mode in the NC is on and the PASC™ mode in the DJ is on, you’ve got a more pronounced isolation effect with the NC and a more pronounced bass effect with the DJ.
 
Fostex & Massdrop TH-X00 Mahogany (modded)

 
Comfort is pretty similar between the two headphones, as both have comfortable headbands and earcups that don’t get very warm (to my ears) after listening for extended sessions.  The TH-X00 has a sound that is warm, inviting, vibrant and has pretty good soundstage and imaging for a closed back.  The DJ on the other hand is more warm especially when PASC™ mode is activated, and is more intimate in spatial capabilities.  The TH-X00 is more resolving, but the DJ has the potential to have more midbass emphasis when PASC™ mode is working.
 
Master & Dynamic MH30

Comfort is similar, but the MH30 feels slightly more secure on the head, partially due to the on-ear form of the headphone.  The MH30 has more midbass emphasis than the DJ when the PASC™ mode is off, but the DJ has more midbass emphasis than the MH30 when the PASC™ is activated.  Resolution favors the DJ, and the technical capabilities are more robust.  However, the MH30 has a bespoke feel to it, and is good if you want a classic look with an adequately warm sound as well.

Master & Dynamic MH40

 
The MH40 weighs more than the MH30, and that tends to have a slightly more weighty feel on the head - slightly more than the DJ as well since the MH40 weighs 360 grams.  The clarity and resolution favors the MH40, and is more of a balanced sound compared to the DJ.  The DJ isn’t too far off from the MH40’s sound signature when PASC™ is turned off, but when the PASC™ is turned on, the DJ is turned into a warmer, bassier and grittier version of the MH40 - slightly so.  

Sennheiser Momentum 2.0 AEi

 
 
The Momentum 2.0 is a lot lighter on the head compared to the DJ, but does not have the technical circuitry inside of the earcups that the DJ has, other than the driver.  The DJ embodies a more midbass with texture sound, and the Momentum 2.0 embodies a more balanced sound.  Clarity and resolution are similar in nature.  The DJ would be great if you are more into a bassier sound, and the Momentum 2.0 if you are more into a more balanced sound, even though both are homologous in nature when it comes to emitting a slightly rich and full sound.

 
Should you modify?

It’s really up to you.  By now you should know that having this headphone as part of your collection (or only headphone) that it has a midbass emphasis with a slightly full sound.  With that said, you may want to dial in modifications to help bring out the midrange as well as upping the treble in the process.  What can you do?

EQ – use your source’s EQ settings to dial in a preferable frequency response to your ears.

Bass Boost or equivalent – use your source’s Bass Boost or equivalent button or switch, as you can with a button press or flip of a switch have immediate results with increased bass with the expense of probably lower perceived treble.  With the DJ, you won’t need this, though, as the DJ has loads of bass, especially when PASC™ is activated.  Preferably a treble boost switch may be a welcome option for those that want an elevation of perceived treble.

Third-party elemental cables – copper, SPC, silver/gold or silver litz, etc. may help further refine the sound signature of the DJ.

I personally won’t be modifying as I am enjoying the unique sound signature the DJ produces.

 
Cultivate a fresh sound
 
What does this mean?  Too often we focus on only the music we are accustomed to.  I am usually this way as well.  Here’s an opportunity to listen to something you either may not normally listen to, or haven’t heard of.  As I publish reviews in the future, I will have new and older tracks from various genres that I’ve listened to in this section, and will be largely based on what songs really moved me in particular to the reviewed product I’ve listened to on it.  Even though the tracks will be linked to YouTube videos or audio-only versions, the tracks will either be listened solely from the iPhone 6 and TIDAL HiFi - Lossless, or from my Microsoft Surface Book, TIDAL HiFi - Lossless and Soundcloud.  Instead of describing each track in immense detail, you can simply listen for yourself and bask in the beautiful music you may have just found for the first time right now!  What’s also great is that you can come back here just to listen to the tracks mentioned!  If you have any personal issues with any tracks posted, please PM me and I'll replace it with another track.  It's all about positivity in our musical journey.  With those kind words of encouragement, here we go…
 
2016 DMC Online Finals (Winning Routine) by DJ Brace
 
Street Fighter II DJ Remix by Skratch Bastid
 
DAY FADE: The HOV Files Vol. 10 By Mr. Modina - HOV HITTERS
https://soundcloud.com/hovhitters/day-fade-the-hov-files-vol-10-by-mr-modina

 
Is the DJ worth it?
 
For those that want a viable alternative to other monitoring or DJ-type of headphones, the DJ is worth an audition and possibly purchase if you come to adore what the DJ has to offer.

 
Final thoughts
 
I have come for the LED lights, and stay for the warm and very full sound of the DJ.  This isn’t an audiophile headphone, as I feel the DU and NC are more up to the task with emitting a more resolute response, but the DJ is one headphone that is truly special in its own way: swivel-ready headband, very comfortable design, and one that is sure to induce dancing when the LED’s pulse to the beat of your immaculately created drum.

 
Specifications
 
  1. Product Weight: 335 grams
  2. Product Dimension (W x H x D): 16.5 x 19.5 x 8 cm
  3. Frequency Response:     18 Hz to 20,000Hz
  4. Sensitivity: 105dB
  5. Impedance: 32 Ohm
  6. Speaker Driver: 50mm
  7. Magnet Type: Neodymium
  8. Distortion: <1%THD IEC3181mW at1KHz
  9. Audio Connection: 3.5mm stereo jack socket
  10. Music Playback Time:     20 hours
  11. Battery Charging Time: 3 hours
  12. Battery Type: Lithium ion polymer
 
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moedawg140

Grand Master Moe "G"….Don't crossface me, bro!
Ping Pong Champ: SF Meet (2016,2017), CanJams (London 2016, RMAF 2016, NYC 2017, SoCal 2017, RMAF 2017)
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  Wonderful review! The Cleers are absolutely stunning headphones to see in person!
 
Thanks, @Netforce!  I like the aesthetics of the DJ and also the NC headphone.  I really like LEDs as well, so that's definitely got something to do with my love of their looks. 
 
 
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