Powering a T-Amp
Dec 6, 2005 at 4:02 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 5

classicalguy

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I'm thinking about my amp options to power some B&W 302 speakers for use with my computer. Here's my idea: (1) buy a T-Amp (Amazon $30 delivered), (2) buy the Radio shack cigarette lighter to plug adaptors (model 270-1594) (RS $12), (3) use my existing Campbell-Hausfield 2400 inflater as the power supply.

I purchased the Campbell Hausfield to inflate car tires. However, it's quite a swiss-army-knife kind of device. I checked and it has a 12v 7 amp SLA battery, and contains a 12v cigarette lighter adaptor. I could plug the RS 270-1594 into the cigarette lighter adaptor and use it to power the T-Amp. Seems like a pretty good $50 solution (no cost for the Campbell Hausfield). Anyone have any thoughts?

Here is a link to the Campbell Hausfield inflator:

http://www.chpower.com/catalog/catalog_detail.asp

Another question. The campbell Hausfield comes with a 12 volt AC recharger. If I leave it plugged into the unit, will the output from the cigarette lighter adaptor be coming from the battery (clean) or from the AC (not clean switching supply, without enough amps)? I suspect the answer is that I need to unplug the AC to listen, then plug it back in when I'm done to recharge.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
 
Dec 7, 2005 at 5:52 AM Post #2 of 5

VR6ofpain

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Interesting idea. You can get 12V seal lead acid batteries quite cheap. I have a 12V 4Ah that I use for my bike light (20watt halogen spot bulb). I have thought about using it with a T-amp for an outdoor system. Not sure how long I could listen though. I also have a "Thor-X" flashlight that I got at Costco ($25). It has a 12V 7Ah battery in it. Oh and I have a good charger that was equally cheap and will work with any 12V battery.
 
Dec 7, 2005 at 2:56 PM Post #3 of 5

JeffS

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Sounds like it would work, but why go through so many steps. If you're
going to be running this thing at your computer, you might as well run it
from your computer.

pick up some hookup wire and a female molex connector.
(might already be in your spare parts collection, or easily located
at your nearest radio shack.)

pickup a correctly sized dc plug for use with the t-amp. doubting you'll
have this, radio shack does come in handy.

grab your soldering iron, and have some fun. Just use an extra tail from the
PSU in your computer to provide the 12v you need for the T-amp. you can
make your life a little neater, by cutting a notch in an unused expanion slot
cover so your only have the new power wire coming out the back. Your amp
will power up with your computer, and you're all set.

-Jeff
 
Dec 7, 2005 at 7:22 PM Post #5 of 5

classicalguy

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On the soldering-into-the-computer question, I wouldn't imagine that the psu in the computer is terribly quiet/clean for audio. I don't know enough about the PSU in a computer either - is it even regulated, or is it switching? Also, would amperage be limited. I have not heard of anyone doing that.

SLA battery should be very quiet and have plenty of amps.

In addition, I don't know how to solder (will I be drummed off of headfi for this admission?)

As to the power required by the B&W 302s, the answer is no, I'm not sure the T-Amp is up to the task. No real way to know until I hook it up, or someone with the same setup answers the question. The speakers are quite efficient (91db), so I would be surprised if the T-Amp isn't up to the task. People have powered similar speakers, so I expect it will be more than adequate. I ordered the T-amp today, so I will let you know in a week or so.

The other option is a good 13.5v regulated psu, which would increase the output of the amp. But I like the idea of sla batteries, and people have reported great results from them. It's kind of nice to utilize something that I already have.
 

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