Mozart's Symphonies
Feb 24, 2006 at 10:49 PM Post #4 of 13

LFF

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bunnyears
All of the late symphonies -- from about No. 38 through 41. Why? Because they are GREAT!


Yeah - I can agree with you there. I have been asked this question before and give the same response and same logic. They are simply great. I sometimes interchange great for magnificent when talking about the Jupiter symphony.

On a more justified approach for explanation there is a CD out there that explains why they are great (Jupiter specifically). You can find it here

Never heard it but it looks good.
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Feb 25, 2006 at 1:57 AM Post #6 of 13

Masolino

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Quote:

Originally Posted by LFF
Yeah - I can agree with you there. I have been asked this question before and give the same response and same logic. They are simply great. I sometimes interchange great for magnificent when talking about the Jupiter symphony.

On a more justified approach for explanation there is a CD out there that explains why they are great (Jupiter specifically). You can find it here

Never heard it but it looks good.
icon10.gif



BBC3's Charles Hazlewood has given similar treatment to all three symphonies of 1788, sometimes with the aid of a period instrument orchestra, in his series "Discovering Music" (scroll down to see all the goodies apart from the Mozart):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/discover...oarchive.shtml

Real audio player is required to listen, but admission is free.
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Feb 25, 2006 at 3:11 AM Post #7 of 13

wang228

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No 25 and No 40. I almost immediately always fell in love with Mozart's work in minor key... there's just something magical/mysterious about them. (Other pieces are piano concerti no.20/24, serenade for winds in C minor, piano sonata/fantasy K457/475, piano quartet in g minor, requiem, etc....)
 
Feb 25, 2006 at 4:51 AM Post #8 of 13

LFF

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Masolino
BBC3's Charles Hazlewood has given similar treatment to all three symphonies of 1788, sometimes with the aid of a period instrument orchestra, in his series "Discovering Music" (scroll down to see all the goodies apart from the Mozart):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/discover...oarchive.shtml

Real audio player is required to listen, but admission is free.
etysmile.gif



SWEET! Thanks a lot for that link.
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Feb 25, 2006 at 7:32 AM Post #9 of 13

Masolino

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Quote:

Originally Posted by wang228
No 25 and No 40. I almost immediately always fell in love with Mozart's work in minor key... there's just something magical/mysterious about them. (Other pieces are piano concerti no.20/24, serenade for winds in C minor, piano sonata/fantasy K457/475, piano quartet in g minor, requiem, etc....)


No doubt Brahm (whose portrait is in your avatar) shared this preference of yours; at one time he had the autograph manuscript of Mozart's No 40 symphony in his collection. It's probably now in the archive of Vienna Philharmonic Society.
 
Feb 25, 2006 at 3:12 PM Post #10 of 13

wang228

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Masolino
No doubt Brahm (whose portrait is in your avatar) shared this preference of yours; at one time he had the autograph manuscript of Mozart's No 40 symphony in his collection. It's probably now in the archive of Vienna Philharmonic Society.


thanks for the anecdote masolino. I never realized Brahms was a fan of No.40 as well
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Feb 25, 2006 at 5:16 PM Post #11 of 13

wang228

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Masolino
BBC3's Charles Hazlewood has given similar treatment to all three symphonies of 1788, sometimes with the aid of a period instrument orchestra, in his series "Discovering Music" (scroll down to see all the goodies apart from the Mozart):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/discover...oarchive.shtml

Real audio player is required to listen, but admission is free.
etysmile.gif



ooh.. thanks for the link. it's really good. The beethoven symphonies no.2 and no.7 are just a perfection introduction to the boston symphony orchestra concert i'm attending tomorrow.
Edited: sorry i was carried away from the thread question.
 
Feb 25, 2006 at 5:27 PM Post #13 of 13

Bunnyears

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Gardiner's Mozart is wonderful. If you can find it, he also had a recording of the 38th and 39th which are terrific and some of the earlier ones (29&33; 31&34) as well with the EBS.
 

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