Meta42 v2.0 power supply hookup ?'s
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TimG

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Well, I have the amp nearly done, except for one little detail. I am using a Elpac linear regulated power supply that uses a Din jack to hook up.

I know that I am not supposed to use the rail splitter or P.S. buffer because it is already +12 / -12.

How do I hookup from the Din jack to the amp.?

Do I run 2 wires from the +12 pin on the Din to the two + pads on the meta, and 2 wires from the -12 pin to the two - pads on the amp?

Also do I do anything with the "com" pin on the din jack?

This is somewhat confusing to me. I would appreciate your help.

Tim.
 
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Toe

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As a related question, I want to make sure I understand this right: There's two types of Elpac power supplies available, one giving +/-12V, and the other giving a straight 24V, correct? The +/-12V cersion would bypass the rail splitter, while 24V version would just be hooked up like a battery, right?
 
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TimG

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Toe, you are correct. I am using the Elpac with the +12 and -12, bypassing the rail splitter and the power supply buffer.

I figured out the correct way to hook up the power supply. It connects as I said above, and the com pin goes to ground.

I just finished the amp about an hour ago, and it sounds great. Much more detail than straight through the headphone jack on my PCDP.

Thanks,

Tim G
 
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tangent

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Will you try something for me, Tim?

Hook up your lowest-impedance set of headphones, set the volume with some music, then play a 10 Hz full-scale sine wave at that volume level. Then with an AC millivolt meter, measure from ground to either of the power rails. How much ripple do you get?

Only if you're bored and also interested.
 
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