How to get this kind of a sound?
May 10, 2015 at 11:55 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 9

silvercats

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Posts
154
Likes
10
I used to have a Sennheiser headphone that sounded like this.The voice (of both male and female) was be girly (or sad?). The String instruments sounded a little bit emotional/sad or  'sharp/deep' ?

I would like to make my new Vsonic VSD5 to sound similar. How should I edit my equalizer to get the sound I mentioned above.

(Also, what IEM models have a sound like I mentioned above?)

[Bass,Low,Mid,Upper,High]    << My equalizer has these options.
 
May 10, 2015 at 12:26 PM Post #2 of 9

ProtegeManiac

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Oct 29, 2009
Posts
16,319
Likes
3,080
Location
Manila
  I used to have a Sennheiser headphone that sounded like this. The voice (of both male and female) was be girly (or sad?). The String instruments sounded a little bit emotional/sad or  'sharp/deep' ?

I would like to make my new Vsonic VSD5 to sound similar. How should I edit my equalizer to get the sound I mentioned above.

(Also, what IEM models have a sound like I mentioned above?)

[Bass,Low,Mid,Upper,High]    << My equalizer has these options.

 
The description of the sound actually tells us nothing of what it sounds like, let alone how to EQ it to mimic the sound of something else.
 
What Sennheiser headphone is that? Its response graph might be on www.headphone.com, you just need to find the response graph of the VSD5. Or just Google both, see if you find anything. You can then work the EQ from looking at both graphs like looking at two pieces of furniture and how to enlarge or make one of them smaller rather than figure out how to make one headphone have vocals "be girly (or sad?)" and strng instruments "a little bit emotional/sad or sharp/deep." I mean, "girly" and "sad" sounds like two different things - sociologically low freqs are associated with negative emotions, like how even isolated tribes in Africa identified the sound off a cello solo as the "sad" tune vs for example a harmonica, while high frequencies where most women's voices are are usually taken to be happy (the running theory is that there are more dangerous low frequency sounds - earthquakes, avalanche, huge wave, thunder, stampede, big cat roar/purr, etc - while high frequencies are more like bird songs, which heralds spring or the end of a storm, plus the default sound preference from infancy by way of a mother's voice).
 
May 10, 2015 at 1:07 PM Post #3 of 9

Me x3

Member of the Trade: FiiO Store Argentina
Joined
Nov 22, 2012
Posts
4,832
Likes
895
   
The description of the sound actually tells us nothing of what it sounds like, let alone how to EQ it to mimic the sound of something else.

+1
 
 
I mean, "girly" and "sad" sounds like two different things - sociologically low freqs are associated with negative emotions, like how even isolated tribes in Africa identified the sound off a cello solo as the "sad" tune vs for example a harmonica, while high frequencies where most women's voices are are usually taken to be happy (the running theory is that there are more dangerous low frequency sounds - earthquakes, avalanche, huge wave, thunder, stampede, big cat roar/purr, etc - while high frequencies are more like bird songs, which heralds spring or the end of a storm, plus the default sound preference from infancy by way of a mother's voice).

Interesting perspective.
 
When women reject you many many times things start to go the other way around...
(Just kidding of course!)
 
May 12, 2015 at 1:55 AM Post #7 of 9

ProtegeManiac

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Oct 29, 2009
Posts
16,319
Likes
3,080
Location
Manila
  yup, sort of.

 
If you use electronics with a flat response, and the amp also doesn't distort when driving whatever speaker or headphone you use which in turn has the smoothest possible response (especially in the midrange and treble) then whatever you hear is as close as possible to her "girly and sad" voice.
 
Again, if you already have whatever Sennheiser headphone that is as a reference, then what you need to do is find the response graph on it and the VSD5, then you EQ the VSD5 to mimic its midrange and treble. "Girly and sad" doesn't tell us what frequencies are emphasized or deemphasized in your reference headphone and what is emphasized or deemphasized in the IEM you want to EQ. 
 
May 12, 2015 at 11:24 AM Post #9 of 9

ProtegeManiac

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Oct 29, 2009
Posts
16,319
Likes
3,080
Location
Manila
  It was Sennheiser HD 219 and it doesn't work any more. I was able to find the response Graph of HD 219, but couldn't find the VSD5 graph any where.

 
You could start fiddling at random, but chances are the odds of randomly hitting the same combo of adjustments to make that kind of response it would be a lot like the odds of winning a prize at the lottery.
 
Maybe you could ask Inner Fidelity to do a measurement of the VSD5? Send them your unit if the site can't get any sample unit otherwise.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top