How do drivers play so many frequencies simultaneously?
Jan 24, 2016 at 1:00 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 8

seanwee

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Hey guys I just had this random thought while listening to an orchestral piece and I wondered " how the heck does one driver produce the violins , cymbals , piano , trumpets ,etc simultaneously?

THX in advance !
 
Jan 24, 2016 at 1:47 AM Post #2 of 8

JK1

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Hey guys I just had this random thought while listening to an orchestral piece and I wondered " how the heck does one driver produce the violins , cymbals , piano , trumpets ,etc simultaneously?

THX 

How does your ear hear all of them at the same time???????
 
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/questions/question/3077/
 
Jan 24, 2016 at 2:21 AM Post #3 of 8

seanwee

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Couldn't make heads or tails......
 
Jan 24, 2016 at 3:30 AM Post #4 of 8

seanwee

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But seriously, how do iems headphones and the likes of it play so many frequencies at once?
 
Jan 24, 2016 at 7:12 AM Post #5 of 8

Beyakusenn

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But seriously, how do iems headphones and the likes of it play so many frequencies at once?

To make it simple: the audio that is being reproduced is a sum of the waves coming from every instrument. Your brain does all the work recognizing different frequencies within this sum of sine waves and letting you recognize different instruments. Some people can even recognize the instrument by looking at the visualization of the waves recorded.
Look at the image below and notice how adding different frequencies together doesn't result in separate oscillations, but that it all ads up to a new pattern:

 
If you think about it, your eardrums are simply drums. Nothing more, nothing less. They can only vibrate the way a drum vibrates and that is backwards and forwards. The same can be said about any single audio driver and microphone. Those also move backwards and forwards with different amplitudes and with the sum of frequencies that they receive.
 
Jan 24, 2016 at 8:40 AM Post #6 of 8

seanwee

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  To make it simple: the audio that is being reproduced is a sum of the waves coming from every instrument. Your brain does all the work recognizing different frequencies within this sum of sine waves and letting you recognize different instruments. Some people can even recognize the instrument by looking at the visualization of the waves recorded.
Look at the image below and notice how adding different frequencies together doesn't result in separate oscillations, but that it all ads up to a new pattern:

 
If you think about it, your eardrums are simply drums. Nothing more, nothing less. They can only vibrate the way a drum vibrates and that is backwards and forwards. The same can be said about any single audio driver and microphone. Those also move backwards and forwards with different amplitudes and with the sum of frequencies that they receive.

Terrific explanation . exactly what i was looking for .
 
Clear and straight to the point.
THX!!!
 

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