Help need Lute Music reccomendations
Nov 4, 2006 at 9:32 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 18

hciman77

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I have just discovered the wonders of Lute Music, I have the collected works for Lute by John Dowland and Lord Cherbury's book of Lute Music, what a cool instrument.

Does anybody have any good reccomendations.

Cheers

Jim
 
Nov 5, 2006 at 12:31 AM Post #2 of 18

FalconP

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Silvius Leopold Weiss is a contemporary of JS Bach, and thanks to the support of the royal court he was able to compose almost solely for the lute. His huge body of works are, unfortunately, still rarely recorded. The Chandos recording of his lute concerti is exemplary, as is the ongoing cycle of his lute sonatas under Naxos.
 
Nov 6, 2006 at 1:51 AM Post #6 of 18

Masolino

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Robert Visse (lute, theorbo, baroque guitar, Louis XIV's teacher)
as recorded by Hopkinson Smith, Jose Minguel Moreno and
Pascal Montehilhet.

Visse and Bach recordings by Eduardo Eguez have great,
marvelous sound.

Giovanni Kasperberger (German lute virtuoso in Rome)
by both O'Dette and Rolf Lisveland.

Bach lute works and transcriptions were recorded by
Hopkinson Smith and Nigel North with great finesse
and insight.
 
Nov 6, 2006 at 3:10 AM Post #8 of 18

Davey

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I have an old LP that I play all the time and love. VIVALDI Lute and Mandolin Concerti. Anton Stingl, lute, Paul Grund & Artur Rumetsch, mandolins, Rudolf Breitschmid, violin, Peter Buck, cello, Martin Galling, harpsichord, Württemberg Chamber Orchestra, Jörg Faerber, conductor. Really nice. It's on Vox.

vivaldimando.jpg


Apparently there is an inexpensive CD that captures some of it called 25 Vivaldi Favorites. No idea what it sounds like, but under $5 new at amazon, or under $2 used
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http://www.amazon.com/25-Vivaldi-Fav.../dp/B00000IPS5
 
Nov 6, 2006 at 6:58 PM Post #10 of 18

hciman77

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Many thanks for the reccomendations. I have bunged a load of them in my Arkiv and Amazon shopping carts.

Cheers

Jim

Bunnyears - thanks for the yourmusic tip I am a yourmusic subscriber so I will put that one in my queue
 
Nov 6, 2006 at 9:01 PM Post #11 of 18

Voltron

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B000HXDESU.01._AA240_SCLZZZZZZZ_V59149640_.jpg


Rhapsody Album Review
You have to give Sting credit for covering the music of John Dowland (1563-1626), a melancholic composer and lutenist from Elizabethan England. Consider Sting the young apprentice: his fascination with the lute, an ancient instrument he received as a gift, led him to the music of Dowland, who is renowned amongst scholars for his lute songs (or "ayres," as they are called). So with help from lutenist Edin Karamasov, Sting not only covers these 17th century compositions, but also joins Karamasov on two instrumental duets and reads bits of an autobiographical letter from the late Dowland. --Eric Shea

Amazon.com Editorial Review
In choosing to cover the music of John Dowland (1563-1626), who is known as the "melancholy madrigalist" from his output of cheerful ditties like "Flow My Tears," Police bandleader Sting has entered into a whole new realm of austere eeriness. Originally inspired by the gift of a lute, the rock superstar and activist sings the songs, deliciously sweet and tender or spirited by turn, accompanying himself, with Edin Karamazov sitting on lute and archlute. For listeners accustomed to hearing material of this period interpreted by rigorously trained early music stylists, especially countertenors and the like, Sting's sometimes tight-jawed, chest-heavy vocals may seem amateurish. It's undeniable that in four-part harmonies, the singer, tightly overdubbed, comes across like a combination of the Swingle Singers and Queen (meaning Freddy Mercury and crew, NOT the first Elizabeth). But it's important to remember that music of this period was routinely heard as a casual diversion in private homes, even more often than at Court. It was considered a crucial social skill to be able to join in with an adequate degree of skill, but not everyone was able to negotiate the perilous melodic twists and turns typical of the era's music. With this in mind, the overall effect is of a candle-lit, postprandial entertainment in the home of an English gentleman. Muttered readings from Dowland's letters and brief snippets of sampled birdsong aside, it is a courageous effort, displaying heartfelt admiration for the composer and a considerable degree of earnest charm. --Christina Roden
 
Nov 6, 2006 at 10:36 PM Post #12 of 18

Bunnyears

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Quote:

Originally Posted by hciman77
Many thanks for the reccomendations. I have bunged a load of them in my Arkiv and Amazon shopping carts.

Cheers

Jim

Bunnyears - thanks for the yourmusic tip I am a yourmusic subscriber so I will put that one in my queue



Let us know how you like them.
wink.gif
 
Nov 23, 2006 at 5:07 PM Post #13 of 18

hciman77

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bunnyears /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Let us know how you like them.
wink.gif



so far I have listened to ...

Mouton Pieces De Luth (Lute) Astree Hopkinson Smith
Bacheler The Bachelers Delight Harmonia Mundi Paul O'Dette
Kapsberger Baroque Lute Music Vol I Classical Express Paul O'Dette
Weiss Weiss Sonatas for Lute Vol 1 Naxos Robert Barto

The above are great, I like the Bacheler most of the above and in general I like Dowland and Bacheler most of all, something about the Elizabethans perhaps. But it is all great stuff. I continue to explore this instrument. Many many thanks for all the suggestions.

I have the Bach (by Gehrig) as yet unheard and the Joachim Held stuff in my Yourmusic queue. More Weiss and more Dowland ready for listening.
 
Nov 24, 2006 at 1:26 AM Post #14 of 18

Masolino

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For Elizabethan lute music played more in the style of a "consort," i.e. multiple lutes anchored with a cittern or a virginal, one remarkable recording is an album called "Love is Strange" on the French Alpha label (Alpha 081).



Love is Strange

01. Wakefilde on a green (John Johnson) (4'48)
02. Dorickk Prelude (Cosyn) (1'55)
03. Decrevi (Anthony Holborne) (4'48)
04. Callinoe (Anonyme) (2'10)

05. Ut re mi fa sol (Robert Parsons) (5'02)
06. Twenty waies upon the bells (Thomas Robinson) (2'45)
07. Irish Toy (John Bull) (0'55)
08. Sellegers Ronnde (John Johnson) (1'19)
09. Green Sleeves (Anonyme) (2'31)

10. Spero (Anthony Holborne) (4'29)
11. Dump (John Johnson) (2'54)
12. Lachrimae (John Dooland) (2'57)
13. Passymeasure Galliard (John Daniel) (3'39)

14. Galiarda (Thomas Morley) (1'58)
15. A toy (Anonyme) (1'06)
16. Trenchmore (John Johnson) (4'17)
17. In Nomine XII "Crye" (Orlando Gibbons) (1'58)

18. Corn Yairds (Anonyme, Rowallan mss) (1'24)
19. A Gray's Inn, the First (Coperario) (4'01)
20. Love is strange (Anonyme) (1'10)
21. Canaries (Anonyme, Straloch mss) (1'38)
22. Upon la mi re (Anonyme) (2'59)

Le Poème Harmonique

Pierre Hantaï, virginal
Éric Bellocq, luth
Massimo Moscardo, luth
Benjamin Perrot, luth
Jean-Luc Tamby, ceterone
Vincent Dumestre, luth & direction
 
Nov 24, 2006 at 2:09 AM Post #15 of 18

hciman77

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Masolino /img/forum/go_quote.gif
For Elizabethan lute music played more in the style of a "consort," i.e. multiple lutes anchored with a cittern or a virginal, one remarkable recording is an album called "Love is Strange" on the French Alpha label (Alpha 081).



Now in my Amzon shopping cart - thanks.
 

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