Great tool for EQ'ing: foobar convolver DSP
Nov 22, 2004 at 7:15 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 8
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So for a long time there has been this plugin called "convolver" sitting in my foobar DSP tray, and I never knew what it was for. After a little study over in the foobar forums, I have found this tool to be quite useful.

What the DSP does is essentially impose an "impluse" file onto the sound being played. Going from a plain impulse curve, this allows one to tweak the impuse file (.wav) in a wave editor program (I'm using cool edit pro) using graphic or parametric EQ, or any other effect you want.

I have used some different graphs to attempt to EQ my HD650 to be flat, by cutting certain parts of the bass, and raising parts of the treble. It has been a most interesting experiment, as my EQ attemps greatly increase the soundstage of the cans (I compared by simply cycling the convolver DSP off and on during a song). With no EQ, the sound seems to be engrossed in a giant wall of bass, turn the EQ on, and the bass wall disappears (albeit with a slight loss in bass punch) and the other instruments take a wider, more distinct placement.

This tool offers plenty of options (depending on the wave editor used), and makes an outboard EQ all but pointless for a PC based rig using foobar. There is definite tweaking to follow, but I am quite impressed with the effect so far.
 
Nov 22, 2004 at 8:27 AM Post #2 of 8

Edwood

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This sounds interesting.

I already enjoy the benefits of a built in EQ.

I'll have to try it.
That is, after I get a computer up and running for it that be.....argh........
frown.gif


-Ed
 
Nov 22, 2004 at 6:13 PM Post #3 of 8

Publius

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The convolver is nice, but note that (at least in theory) it is no better and no worse than an any FIR filter. foobar's built in equalizer generates an equalization that can be represented using the convolver, but with the convolver you have more control over the steepness of the bands etc.

I personally prefer a biquad parametric equalizer of my own design, which yields transition bands which are far far smoother than most FIR equalizers. Much less CPU usage too.
 
Nov 22, 2004 at 6:36 PM Post #4 of 8

evillamer

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I do find that the Foobar Convolver uses too much CPU resource for me to even do basic internet surfing without slowdowns(on a P4 3Ghz).

Speaking of DSP, I could only think of my EMU soundcard's hardware DSP. It saves lots of CPU power and not to mention that it is very accurate(32bit Precision), but sadly, it is also one of the most diffcult to use Equalizer I have seen.

I see no reason for anyone who owns a EMU soundcard to use Foobar's EQ/Convolver DSP, unless of course they have problems using the EMU's Patch Mixer.
 
Nov 22, 2004 at 8:28 PM Post #5 of 8

llmobll

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Wow, another converted soul!



Like i said before, there is no need for an EQ!


-dan
 
Nov 23, 2004 at 3:48 AM Post #6 of 8

dowxp

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I find music rather bland without adjustments.

convolver: SPL GoldMike Impulse w Flair
EQ: theatre setting [more or less], used to recover bass
4front headphones.

may sound like dsp overload, but its what i like.
 
Dec 2, 2004 at 4:24 PM Post #8 of 8

JeffL

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Quote:

Originally Posted by llmobll
Wow, another converted soul!



Like i said before, there is no need for an EQ!



Don't tell somebody who does live sound reinforcement that...
 

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