Extreme Cold Damage?
Jan 30, 2004 at 11:15 PM Post #16 of 27
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Quote:

Originally posted by Music Fanatic
There is a standard operating range of temperatures for all electronics. Going substantially above or below that range can cause problems. This is almost always in the owner's manual (but who among us ever reads headphone owner's manuals?)


Or the owners manuals to much of anything for that matter
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Feb 1, 2004 at 4:34 PM Post #17 of 27

reeseboisse

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I'm always scared to use my cans outside in the winter, considering I live in Massachusetts, and temperatures have been going way, way down recently. I've noticed that I'm not usually worried about the cord breaking, so much as the diaphragm creasing again. And considering how open my cans are, I get paranoied.
 
Feb 1, 2004 at 4:49 PM Post #19 of 27

john_jcb

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Quote:

Originally posted by Distroyed
Extreme cold doesnt damage electronics... indeed, it makes them run more efficiently. It's when you touch them at such a cold temperature or moisture that may accompany the temperature that will get you in trouble.


This like most generalizations is true a good part of the time. Manufacturers often encapsulate or protect components with various products. At normal temperatures there is no problem but when it gets very cold and the coefficient of expansions are different parts can be damaged. I have seen glass diodes cracked by potting in power supplies for instance. The other thing that happens even more often is that some plastics get extremely brittle and break with very little force.
 
Feb 1, 2004 at 6:39 PM Post #20 of 27

slunk007

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Honestly, I don't think that much will happen to your cans in that kind of cold. I'd be more worried about your portable player.

Here in Winnipeg last week, we experienced record breaking lows. With the windchill, temperatures were -55 celcius (-67 fahrenheit). Yes... it was ******** cold.

Anyway, I always take the bus to work and back, and with my MDR-EX70's on, the only bad thing I noticed was that the cord gets stiff. Oh... and another thing. If it's cold, don't take your earbuds out, because when you put them back in, it feels like you're putting ice cubes in your ears. Not a nice feeling.

I use my iMP-550 when I commute and I keep it on the inside pocket of my jacket. No problems there either.

Basically, I'd say that if you are cold, your electronics are probably cold too. If you can't function, then it probably wont function either.

For the people that wear the big cans outdoors... I've seen people here in Winnipeg double them as ear-muffs!

Anyway, I thought I'd put your weather-whining into perspective. It might be cold where you are, but probably not as cold as some places. Dress warm, and suck it up.

Cheers!
 
Feb 1, 2004 at 7:10 PM Post #21 of 27

reeseboisse

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Quote:

Originally posted by slunk007
Here in Winnipeg last week, we experienced record breaking lows. With the windchill, temperatures were -55 celcius (-67 fahrenheit). Yes... it was ******** cold.


Cheers!


Yea fine, you win.
 
Feb 1, 2004 at 7:21 PM Post #22 of 27

philodox

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well I've been using my akg k271 studio's in the cold and like slunk said they do double duty as ear muffs :p

I've never noticed any problems from doing this and I have been doing so for a month... actually I swear that the sound improved after the first time I took them in the cold, but that might just be my over active imagination
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Feb 1, 2004 at 7:30 PM Post #23 of 27

slunk007

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Quote:

Originally posted by reeseboisse
Yea fine, you win.


Honestly, I really didn't want to win that contest...
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Feb 1, 2004 at 8:15 PM Post #24 of 27

pedxing

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Extreme cold temperatures have a habit of ruining certain types of plastic and rubber compounds. Rubbers have a tendancy to become hard and stiff in the cold. If things get too cold, they can crack and the composition of the rubber can change over time (sometimes a dusty or greasy coating forms around rubbers after being exposed to extreme temperatures - usually a sign that the material is excreting oils). Execess heat has a tendany to make those things melt or become looser.

Integrated circuits have a small range of temperatures they can function at. Semiconductors lose their semiconductor-like nature if the temperature is too cold or too hot.
 
Feb 2, 2004 at 1:16 AM Post #25 of 27

blux

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Quote:

Originally posted by ojnihs
No I'm not. That's Carlson School Of Management at the U. Carleton is in Northfield, MN.


lol, shows you how much I know about the U..

I'm at St. Cloud State!
 
Feb 7, 2004 at 5:00 AM Post #26 of 27

Cor

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Actually, this is something I found to be unusual about the stock iPod buds. They stiffen up at much milder temperatures than any other head-phone I've ever used. They're like 12-gauge solid-core copper wire at 0 degrees celsius! I have a pair of equally crappy Sony earbuds that don't do that even at -25 celsius. I suppose the Californian panzies at Apple just didn't bother to do any cold-weather testing.
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Feb 7, 2004 at 7:27 AM Post #27 of 27

Prince

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Quote:

Originally posted by slunk007

For the people that wear the big cans outdoors... I've seen people here in Winnipeg double them as ear-muffs!


That's what I am doing
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