Expensive CD Player Resale
Mar 4, 2006 at 6:58 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 15

Hellacious D

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I wanted to get an idea of how quickly CDPs lose value. For instance, if I buy a Rega Apollo for 995, can you approximate its value in 10 years? Has anyone had an expensive CDP that they resold several years later? What were your results? How much better will audio players be in 10 years?
Thanks for your help,
Jeff
 
Mar 4, 2006 at 3:02 PM Post #2 of 15

hciman77

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I cant say I have bought any expensive CD players from new but I have bought many many used CD players. The Rotel RCD975 was priced at $750 new in 1995 - I bought one 10 years later for $250 i.e 33%. A $600 Denon from 1989 I picked up for $25 and a $400 Rotel RCD855 (1989) goes for between $100 and $150. My current single disc player NAdC542 was $460 new and 6 months later was $325 (to me) shipped - viz some things seem to keep their value better than others.
 
Mar 4, 2006 at 3:07 PM Post #3 of 15

mrarroyo

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Well I purchased a Denon DCD-1100 in 1986 and I think I paid around $400. It works great looks good and I have the original box, manual, and remote. I think I would be lucky if I got $75 for it.
 
Mar 4, 2006 at 9:37 PM Post #4 of 15

Jeff Guidry

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It depends on its scarcity and perceived quality. If it's a well regarded player, but common, it won't command high prices. Rare items that have acheived legendary status will garner big prices, sometimes in excess of their original selling price (HF-1's, for example).
 
Mar 4, 2006 at 11:47 PM Post #5 of 15

meat01

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Rega Planets (2000) have held their value over the years, but the 1st version hasn't because everyone wants the newer one. You just never know. A lot of the Rotel CD players are a lot cheaper these days, except the 990, which is supposedly the best one.
 
Mar 5, 2006 at 5:07 AM Post #6 of 15

raisin

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I don't see Redbook being relevant in ten years, certainly nowhere like the way vinyl hangs in there.
eek.gif
 
Mar 5, 2006 at 7:03 AM Post #7 of 15

tyrion

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I would estimate that the Planet held onto 60% of it's value almost 6 years later. They are going for a little less now because the Apollo has been released. I think we should expect that the Apollo will do at least that and perhaps a bit better. It is supposed to be a much better cdp than the Planet. I've spent considerable time with the Apollo but not the Planet so the above is from what I've been told and read. I am crossing my fingers that my Apollo will arrive in the next week or so.
 
Mar 5, 2006 at 2:13 PM Post #8 of 15

Garbz

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Quote:

Originally Posted by raisin
I don't see Redbook being relevant in ten years, certainly nowhere like the way vinyl hangs in there.
eek.gif



Really what do you see as the replacement? 2 technologies which are going no where, or compression and online music which many of us detest. Wait isn't that exactly what happened to vinyl
biggrin.gif


10 years is a bit long, but obviously if I buy a $200 Pioneer DVD player I don't expect more then $40 next year. That said if I bought a Music Fidelity A3 cdplayer for $2000 I still expect it to be worth about half many years from now.
 
Mar 5, 2006 at 2:26 PM Post #9 of 15

riffer

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Sorry, I can't see very many CD players holding their value over the long term.

In addition to technological obsolescence, they have moving parts that can wear out.

There is a 40% loss in resale value from "street price" once any item leaves the dealer (with some exceptions). After that, some CD players - like the top Sony SACD models - hold their value for a while - but not for ten years.
 
Mar 5, 2006 at 7:06 PM Post #10 of 15

Beauregard

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Quote:

Originally Posted by riffer
... In addition to technological obsolescence, they have moving parts that can wear out. ...


Key point. And, in this age of replace-instead-of-repair, it's unlikely that the spare parts to fix a broken transport or laser mounting would be available much past the model's sales life anyway.

If you're someone who keeps audio equipment for a long time (like me), then resale value has no place in buying decisions. Get quality equipment and enjoy the hell out of it! That's the return on your investment.
 
Mar 5, 2006 at 7:30 PM Post #11 of 15

F1GTR

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Quote:

Originally Posted by meat01
Rega Planets (2000) have held their value over the years, but the 1st version hasn't because everyone wants the newer one. You just never know. A lot of the Rotel CD players are a lot cheaper these days, except the 990, which is supposedly the best one.


Actually the original has held its value extremely well over the years.

Five years ago I bought one on Audigon for $300. They now regularly auction off at ebay for $350-450.
 
Mar 6, 2006 at 10:56 PM Post #14 of 15

Bones13

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In my humble opinion, within 10 years, we will be accessing all music over the net. Audiophiles will be able to access whatever level of quality they want to pay for. Same goes for HD TV. "Content" providers will abound, and you will pay an access fee for usage of the content.

Just think "NOS" CD recordings from the present time
580smile.gif
 

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