Depressing Classical
Mar 14, 2002 at 10:10 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 22

Eli's Adventure

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This is my favorite type of classical. But it seems as though i cannot find hardly any artists that produce the type of classical that i enjoy.

The kind i am looking for is romantic, depressing, smooth classical. It is kinda hard to explain, so i will give you some examples:

Beethoven - Moonlight sonata
Clint Mansell - Lux Aeterna
Wojciech Kilar - Love Remembered

So, if any of you could give me some good recommendations, i would be very thankful.
 
Mar 14, 2002 at 10:24 PM Post #2 of 22

AndreYew

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There are lots with similar moods to the pieces you mention, in some order of increasing depression:

1. Ralph Vaughn-Williams, Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis

2. Barber, Adagio for Strings

3. Brahms, piano pieces, opus 116-119

4. Mahler, 9th symphony, especially the last movement

5. Mahler, 6th symphony, but this may be too rough and tumble

6. Mahler, Das Lied von der Erde (Song of the Earth), especially the last movement

7. Mahler, Ruckert Lieder, especially Um Mitternacht (At Midnight)and Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen (I have become lost to the world)

8. Tchaikovsky, 6th symphony

There are lots more, and it depends on what you're looking for.

I'd classify 1 as not really depressing sad, but introspective in a sad way. 2 is more extrovertly sad, especially given its extra-musical associations --- it's usually played at funerals and memorials. For example, shortly after 9/11, many symphony orchestras started their programs with Barber's Adagio for Strings. 3 is sentimental sadness, like recalling a sad thing that happened long ago in your life, but in a detached way.

4 is sad in a good bye to life kind of way --- you've made peace with the world, and you're ready to go. 6, and 7 are like that too.

5 is angry sad --- you keep trying and getting beaten down, and then you die. 8 is somewhat along the same lines.

--Andre
 
Mar 14, 2002 at 10:35 PM Post #4 of 22

Eli's Adventure

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Thank you for your suggestions.

I already have downloaded some works of Gustav Malher, so i am familiar with his work, somewhat. I like him, but i don't classify him as what i am looking for.

I didn't like what i have heard of Tchaikovsky. But i will check out that one song .

I will also check out the other artists.

Maybe i should have told you that i am not looking for anything that is a symphony.

I am a newbie at classical, so i will just say that i enjoy listening to violins and pianos the most.
 
Mar 14, 2002 at 11:03 PM Post #6 of 22

DarkAngel

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One piece immediately comes to mind

Tchaikovsky Symphony 6 - final movement.
Utter despair and surrender, all hope is gone, fade to black
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Check out the bittersweet waltz from the 2nd movement of sym 6 also, the final dance of a broken hearted lover who will never see his love again.

3rd movment is the heroic last stand, the valiant fight before succumbing to inevitable defeat.
 
Mar 14, 2002 at 11:25 PM Post #8 of 22

redshifter

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goreki: symphony 3 "symphony of sorrowful songs"
if this one doesn't bring you down you must be on ex.
 
Mar 15, 2002 at 1:09 AM Post #9 of 22

shivohum

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Hrmm but then of course there's the paradox that after hearing a truly beautiful "sad" song I'm inspired...
smily_headphones1.gif


You might want to try Massenet's Meditation on the Thais -- it's a famous violin solo.

Oh and Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet Overture is an melodic tragedy and love story told in 20 mins.
 
Mar 15, 2002 at 4:52 AM Post #10 of 22

dngl

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In addition to Mahler (amazing, as stated above), I would recommend Bach's Sleepers, Awake because it makes me very depressed after I listen to it.
 
Mar 15, 2002 at 1:33 PM Post #12 of 22

Wes

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The trouble with symphonies from your point of view, Eli's Adventure, is that they are supposed to vary in mood and provide a good many contrasting experiences. That's why we're all trying to pick out movements from symphonies that would suit you.

That said, there are some areas still to suggest. Try Arvo Part, especially his "Cantus in Memoriam to Benjamin Britten." This is a great orchestral piece that does a startling trick: the music seems always to be descending. At the very end is a wonderful effect of orchestration where loud strings suddenly stop so that you can hear the after-ringing of a bell whose first stroke you missed because the strings completely covered it. This might be a metaphor for whatever survives after death, I suppose. Anyhow, not exactly turbulent, but very moving.

Other of Part's pieces might work for you. He has a lot of very sober liturgical pieces, mostly vocal.

If vocal is not objectionable, try anything composed by Hildegard of Bingen, especially a disc called "A Feather on the Breath of God." This is music from the 11th or 12th century by a woman of high standing in the church who wrote visionary religious poetry and set it to music.

For piano, you could try the Preludes and Fugues of Shostakovich. These are mostly pretty dark in atmosphere.
 
Mar 15, 2002 at 1:34 PM Post #13 of 22

Nattapong

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Since there are a number of symphonies and concertos suggested here... here are some choral and solo instrumental music.

Choral: Agnus Dei The Choir of New College Oxford/ Edward Higginbotton based on Adagios for String (Barber)

Jason Vieaux : Guitar recital Suite del recuerdo and Cinco Preludios are beautiful sad songs... especially Preludio Triston from Cinco Preludios literally means "Sad" prelude.

Keith Jarrett "The Koln Concert" I felt that there are plenty of sad moment on it.
 
Mar 15, 2002 at 1:35 PM Post #14 of 22

insanefred

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Try some Schubert Lieder, such as Winterreise or Die Schone Mullerin, it's all tremendously depressing stuff! Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau is the singer to look for here.
Andrew
 
Mar 16, 2002 at 5:21 AM Post #15 of 22

Dusty Chalk

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Josef Suk - Asrael

Suk was a student of Antonin Dvorák, himself a well-known composer. They became so close that Suk married his daughter. In 1904, Dvorák died; a year later, his wife died. He became very depressed after that. This piece is from that period. I don't have a particular performance to recommend, because I only know of one, and wouldn't mind a better one, so if someone does, please post.
 

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