Can CD's Wear Out
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ElectroJunkie

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I was wondering, scratches not included do CD's wear out at all, i.e. degrade overtime? The reason I ask is because I am super prote=ctive over my cd collection and i am always paranoid that i am wearing out the disks!
 
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warubozu

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The quality control over the production of CD media for audio and data is very high in recent years and cd rot isn't currently a problem which had been addressed years ago. CDs that were manufactured in the early 80's when quality control over the media manufacturing process wasn't as high and tight could fall victim to cd rot over time. Google cd rot as there is a lot of info on this topic and pictures of cd rot. Normal playing and handling of your cds will not wear it out.
 
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JWFokker

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CD rot is oxidization of the reflective layer above the polycarbonate substrate resulting from inadequate application of protective laquer to the top of the disc. Improper laquer application was more of a problem with old discs before the manufacturing process was perfected. It's still an issue however, as even the best discs will eventually oxidize. This is the reason for 'reference' discs with a gold reflective layer. Gold does not oxidize.
 
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yaufei

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What about CD-R/RW that will be become unreadable just 1 year after burning them? Could the same apply to commerical CDs?
 
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warubozu

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Quote:

Originally Posted by yaufei
What about CD-R/RW that will be become unreadable just 1 year after burning them? Could the same apply to commerical CDs?


No, CD-R/RW media should last longer than that unless they are exposed to excessive light (ie direct sunlight). CD-R media has a dye layer on the reflective aluminum disc which is burned by the laser and CD-RW has a phase change recording layer. Both of which are sensitive to excessive light. Commercial CDs on the other hand have physically molded pits on the aluminum reflective disc which can over a period of time oxidize. They oxidize due to the aluminum disc being exposed to air.
 
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gloco

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I've owned cds going back to 1992, no problems with them at all. I have cdr's dating back to 1998 and they work perfectly and they rip perfectly with eac.
 
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chillysalsa

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I had a Hyperion disc from '92 that was starting to get 'clicking' sounds towards the end of the disc. The CD started to turn gold/bronze over time, and it is well documented on their website:

http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/bronzed.asp

Simply a bad batch of discs that had oxidation problems with the lacquer. I emailed them and the company that made the discs mailed me a replacement!

I had a similar thing happen to some Princo CDR discs, but obvisously I can't get those replaced!
 
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drarthurwells

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Surface mildew/fungus growth in humid environments can be a problem, slightly obstructing the laser read. Too much error correction to compensate could slightly degrade the sound.
 
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maxx76

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Aside from the Mobile Fidelity brand are there any other audiophile grade cd-r's on the market?
 
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maxx76

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Quote:

Originally Posted by maxx76
Aside from the Mobile Fidelity brand are there any other audiophile grade cd-r's on the market?


To recap the it's actually the Ultradisc 24kt Gold CD-R i was refering to. Manufactured by MF Sound Labs.
 
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warubozu

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I'm currently re-ripping my entire CD collection and I'm starting to run into a few CD's with Disc Rot. This is the thing I don't quite understand: My Stereo can play the CD's without a single problem even though it's about 17 years old, but PC optical drives can't rip them correctly. Surely optical drives aren't that sensitive?
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Pageygeeza /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I'm currently re-ripping my entire CD collection and I'm starting to run into a few CD's with Disc Rot. This is the thing I don't quite understand: My Stereo can play the CD's without a single problem even though it's about 17 years old, but PC optical drives can't rip them correctly. Surely optical drives aren't that sensitive?


PC CD-ROM drives work to much tighter error tolerances than CD players as the odd data error will not make any audible differences in a CD player but a single error can stop a program from installing. Also your ripping software may be more or less stringent and of course your PC CD-Rom drive could be flaky. I ripped my collection a few years back and my CDs go back to 1982 and not one of mine failed to rip in EAC but some scratched ones did have more errors reported.

How many of your Cds % wise fail to rip and did you use any of them as coasters
 
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