Wired Earphones, Mixcder X5 In-Ear Earbud Headphones Metal Housing with Mic, Noise Reducing for 3.5mm Audio Output iPhone and other Smartphones - Black | Reviews

Wired Earphones, Mixcder X5 In-Ear Earbud Headphones Metal Housing with Mic, Noise Reducing for 3.5mm Audio Output iPhone and other Smartphones - Black

Average User Rating:
4.09091/5,
  1. slowpickr
    4.0/5,
    "MIXCDER X5 - A SUB-$20 POWERHOUSE"
    Pros - Build quality, price, phone call option
    Cons - None at this price point
    Introduction/Disclaimer:
     
    I would like to thank Denise with Mixcder for the opportunity to review the X5 in ear monitor headphones. They provided me a free sample in exchange for my honest opinion. I assumed by the initial description that these IEMs would go for around $50 or higher. Bad assumption. Current price on Amazon is $17 (see link below). 
     
    Mixcder requested that reviews be completed within a week after receipt.  Normally, I would spend more time than this getting to know a headphone or IEM.  Keep this in mind for the review below.
     
    My Background and Sound Preference:
     
    I joined Head-Fi back in 2009 when I started researching headphones for travel. Thousands of dollars later, I’ve built up a collection of mostly budget (under $200) IEMs and headphones. Not an audiophile by any stretch of the imagination. Starting out, I was definitely a basshead. However, the last couple of years or so I’ve come to appreciate other aspects of good sound like vocal clarity, instrument details/separation and bass quality that doesn’t overwhelm everything else.
     
     
    Specs and Accessories:
     
    Here is a link to Mixcder’s website which has the specs and included accessories:
     
    https://www.mixcder.com/mixcderr-x5-wired-eaphone.html
     
     
    Link to Amazon for Purchase:
     
    https://www.amazon.com/Headphones-Mixcder-Housing-Reducing-Smartphones/dp/B06XD6QTT7/ref=sr_1_1
     
     
    Build Quality and General Usage Observations:
     
    The X5s came in a simple, thin cardboard box a little smaller than my hand. Inside was the case packed with the IEMs, ear guides, shirt clip and ear tips. The case is very good quality and provides plenty of protection for a backpack, luggage or pants pocket.
     
    The black cable is on the thin side and has a plastic like coating. It does have some memory to it but not a gargantuan amount like some others I’ve had (e.g. UE TF10). Strain relief seems adequate for this price range. The shirt clip pivots all around which means it can be clipped at multiple angles if desired. The single button control on the cable paused and started music while using my phone.
     
    The ear pieces themselves are metal and have a good feel to them. I recall years ago $17 would get you some cheap Sonys or Philips with plastic housings that would short out or fall apart after only a few hours of use. The quality of budget IEMs these days has definitely gone up several notches.
     
    Lastly in this section I would like to point out that the provided ear tips actually worked for me! This rarely happens even with more expensive sets. The ear pieces stay in place and are very comfortable.
     

     

     

     

     

     
     
    Sound Quality:
    Basically, my ears interpret the sound of the X5s as a skewed, mild “v” shape with the skew at the bass end of the spectrum. I think any admitted basshead would be happy with these. Perhaps not some of the “hardcore” bassheads that are in the Head-Fi threads with that description. Still, I find the bass to be strong, textured and of decent quality. Sub-bass is present along with mid-bass. Mids and treble both take a back seat. However, I find the vocals to still be clear and enjoyable. Treble is non-fatiguing (fortunately) and has decent extension. Don’t expect a lot of details though. But, definitely acceptable for the price (did I mention they sell for $17?).
     
    I’m no expert on sound stage, but I will convey what I hear. Vocals are in the head while instruments are just outside the left and right ears. The instrument separation is pretty good for this price range.
     
    The X5s are easy to drive and sound great out of a phone or DAP.  Isolation is about average for a IEM.
     
    Phone Calls:
     
    I made several phone calls using the X5s. I had no problems hearing the other parties. Likewise, the other parties did not complain about my vocal quality. Also didn’t hear any static or interference during any of the calls.
     
    Conclusion:
     
    I could nit-pick about the small amount of cable memory present or that the treble could have a little more sparkle or be more smooth or refined or that the vocals could be a little more forward while the bass could be a toned down a bit, but for the price (did I mention that they cost $17), I can’t find much to complain about for an IEM with good build quality and sound. A lot has definitely changed in audio gear over the past few years.
     
    Thanks for reading!
     
    Notes:
     
    This review was performed using 320 Kbps MP3s and FLAC files of various genres (mostly classic rock and EDM (e.g. Infected Mushroom)). Listening levels were moderate to moderately loud. DAPs used were Rockboxed Xduoo X3 (flat EQ), Cowon Plenue D (rock setting) and a Samsung Galaxy S6 (PowerAmp).
  2. themoddingden
    4.0/5,
    "Wired Earphones, Mixcder X5 In-Ear Earbud Headphones Metal Housing with Mic, Noise Reducing for 3.5mm Audio Output iPhone and other Smartphones - Blac"
    Pros - highs are clear,bass is good
    Cons - pause /play/answer button placement to high on cheak
    mixcder x5 review by The Modding Den:
     

    Package:
    thoughts on package:
    box is great eco change from the plastic,
    you get on other headsets .
    the colors are nice and bright but not too loud.
    the case included is very nice .
    comes with multi tips in different sizes.
     
    Package pics:

     

     

     

     
     
    Whats in the box:

     

     

     
     
     
     
     
    Shot of the Play/answer/pause button/mic:

     
     
    side by side shot / cord length(pop iem right and X5 Left)
    (standard dinner table below/lol I had to)

     
    (Pop IEM)
     

     
     
    (Mixcder X5)
     

     
     
     
    default tips seem to be to small for my big ear ports,
    i almost  slide them all the way in i felt.
    I use a s4 stock headphone ear tips on popular iem from Hisound’s  UK that was bought from,
    HeadFi forum sponsor. and these units had issues with the included tips.
    and cause what i feel made folks doubt them. with the s4 tips the base came in,
    and was what i liked. but then again I love Hollywood Sound labs 12" tube subs .
    we had 2 running in a friends car  on a refurb soundlabs amp.
    At this time I was also  getting stuff from MCM Electronics and happen on the pyle display package tweeter ,
     with a crossover you had to solder on to get max rms. and these thing made your ears bleed,
    and it let me hear sound that i never heard from  NWA classics to other music horns that hit hard,
    but were so clean . the x5's come with a close to this mix. the highs are there but so is the bass .
    and this was with out an amp straight on the moto x play.

    All further results will be with the large tips and
     I'll include  magni amp results.
    With out amp Moto Xplay direct:
    So play back with the huge tips on(did I mention I hate switching tips).
    Bass is there and highs are bright and clear . not all of my recordings like ,
    these  headphones . Beyerdynamic has a recording of the Grateful Dead that i use and with these headset you get some of the detail in the  tune Space but 
    popular iem,ATH AD700s , Razor Moray in ears render this tune better. 
    with the x5's you get the highs no problem.
    Slayers rain in blood  ,Necrophobic also seem to lose the mids and bass to the track . these speakers try and go down low but can't with this tune/song style none amped. 
    Rap songs fair better . Shawnna- hit the back/slide in and some others seem to do ok with it. but others you lose a bit of detail/low end that others pic up even with my bad copies now this could be why but on others headsets i have i get a fuller sound.
    While still Nas the world is yours seemed to be missing the bass(could be my copy though) but I do swear it is there in the other headsets.
    This testing was all done on a MotoXplay.
     pause button/play worked no issue.
    I will try it with songs on a Iphone 5s as well to test out other tunes my other half has in mp3. my songs were all in Flac converted from mp3 or recorded as Flac or ogg or mp3(really i still have these).
    I will test with the Magni amp(version1)
     on the desktop as well.
    I can't find my cmoy amp right now  but will post on with that at a later time.
    now just with 2 songs the world is yours by Nas and Necrophobic by Slayer on the desktop amp showed improved sound and that they can take a bit of juice.
    from a wisper to a few clicks up I played  necrophobic and no distortion or anything and could of gone more  a bit of a surprise there these are only 16.99 at amazon + shipping etc. so not expecting this.
    Post Modern Jukebox  Call me Maybe was another track I used on the desktop with the Magni amp w built in sound and it sounds great .
    the slayer track still seems weak on the drums but  once again older song and not sure of original source. 
     
    The testing was done on this pc:
    System:    Host: linbeast Kernel: 4.10.1-041001-generic x86_64 (64 bit gcc: 6.2.0)&4.10.11.041011-generic x86_64
               Desktop: Cinnamon 3.2.7 (Gtk 3.18.9-1ubuntu3.2) dm: mdm Distro: Linux Mint 18.1 Serena()
    Machine:   Mobo: ASRock model: 970M Pro3
     Bios: American Megatrends v: P1.30 date: 09/01/2015
    CPU:       Octa core AMD FX-8320 Eight-Core (-MCP-) cache: 16384 KB
               flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 sse4a ssse3 svm) bmips: 55877)
               clock speeds: min/max: 1400/3500 MHz 1: 1400 MHz 2: 1400 MHz 3: 1400 MHz 4: 2300 MHz
               5: 1400 MHz 6: 1700 MHz 7: 1700 MHz 8: 1400 MHz
    Graphics:  Card: NVIDIA GM107 [GeForce GTX 750 Ti] bus-ID: 01:00.0 chip-ID: 10de:1380
               Display Server: X.Org 1.18.3 drivers: nvidia (unloaded: fbdev,vesa,nouveau)
               Resolution: 1920x1080@60.00hz
               GLX Renderer: GeForce GTX 750 Ti/PCIe/SSE2
               GLX Version: 4.5.0 NVIDIA 378.13 Direct Rendering: Yes
    Audio:     Card-1 NVIDIA Device 0fbc driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 01:00.1 chip-ID: 10de:0fbc
               Card-2 Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA)
               driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:14.2 chip-ID: 1002:4383
               Card-3 Logitech driver: USB Audio usb-ID: 002-002 chip-ID: 046d:082c
               Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.10.1-041001-generic
    Network:   Card: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet Controller
               driver: r8169 v: 2.3LK-NAPI port: d000 bus-ID: 05:00.0 chip-ID: 10ec:8168
               IF: enp5s0 state: up speed: 100 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter>
    Drives:    HDD Total Size: 1616.6GB (24.2% used)
               ID-1: /dev/sda model: WDC_WD10EZEX size: 1000.2GB serial: WD-WMC1S0794227
               ID-2: /dev/sdb model: WDC_WD6000HLHX size: 600.1GB serial: WD-WXK1E72YYC34
               ID-3: USB /dev/sdc model: USB_Flash_Drive size: 16.2GB serial: AA180B2800000024-0:0
    Partition: ID-1: / size: 106G used: 53G (53%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sdb2
    RAID:      System: supported: N/A
               No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
               Unused Devices: none
    Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 12.0C mobo: N/A gpu: 0.0:28C
               Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
    Info:      Processes: 262 Uptime: 3:12 Memory: 2009.1/11970.4MB
               Init: systemd v: 229 runlevel: 5 default: 2 Gcc sys: 6.2.0 alt: 5
               Client: Unknown python2.7 client inxi: 2.2.35
    and:
     
    the Moto Xplay .

    These headphones when amped shine drums are crisp and highs are good,
    and for me with large tips not that bright in the highs area.
    bass in rap music  shines, and falls back in  heavy metal. Post Modern Jukebox tune has base but it is a full sound when amped and not the stock tips.
    this is of course for me . 
     
    Gaming:

    I tried it out on my game of choice The game of Rust
    games sounded  different for sure all testing was done with  music in background turned off as it tends to mess you up.
    background ,steps(on different materials were a treat) .
    But would take a bit to get use too after the ad 700's.
     
    Play /pause/answer button placement:
    I feel  is a con for this  unit but not a deal breaker and here is why,
    I wear these iem's  with button on the right side with large tips and it feels good /they don't fall out.
    I'm not sure if this is right as it may place mic on wrong.(may be my old eyes not seeing  right or left mark).
    I've worn them both ways but with play button on the right it feels better.
     
    End:
    I would try tips to find your setup and give em a go. worth the cash.
    Can you get cheaper  sure  but are they as good  most likely not.
    now me and the love of my life will have to fight over these or the popular iem.
     while others who got them thought they sucked.(not) .
    We will see which one of us  get's  what .(she got the others/these are mine).
    I use the ath ad700's most of the time with my amp to game etc.
    so these will be travel use headset for now.
    I use to wear the ad700 out with my cmoy amp and phone.
    so smaller headset setup but great sound.
    get them on:
  3. TwinACStacks
    3.5/5,
    "Quality without a Mortgage"
    Pros - Build quality is premium, EQ makes this a comfortable listen, good for everyday use.
    Cons - Sub Bass looseness, smallish sound stage, only fair detail.
     https://www.amazon.com/Headphones-Mixcder-Housing-Reducing-Smartphones/dp/B06XD6QTT7/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492515246&sr=8-1&keywords=Mixcder+X5
     
     
     
    Disclaimer:
    I am a hobbyist only. I am NOT affiliated with any sellers or manufacturers for items that may be used in my review, nor at this time am I provided with any samples for endorsement or reviews. I purchase all of my own gear. I do However, post links to the particular individual seller from whom I have made my purchase of the item under review. These reviews reflect my personal opinions of the performance and general information about the item, and should not be used as a basis for any purchase. As I am a Tad sensitive to higher frequencies, your impressions may also vary from my own. I will try to offer comparisons as long as I have something similar both in price and construction to compare. If however at any time I am provided a sample for review, I will disclose this fact immediately on an additional disclaimer.
     
     
    Preamble and additional Disclaimer:
    I would like to thank Mixcder and Denise for supplying me a review sample in return for an honest review of their new product. I wish I had enough time parameter for a Full burn in and Complete comparison however.  For this Writer a week simply isn’t enough, and my opinions can drastically change with time permitting. I certainly hope I haven't done an injustice to these finely Crafted IEMs with a hasty review.
     
     
    Specifications:  They are available from Seller’s Link above
     
     
     
    At the risk of redundancy this is an abreviated Photo of The X5 and Packaging:

     
     
    Construction: 
    Mildly surprised about the construction of these. On close inspection all major components are nicely finished METAL, IEM Housings, Line Mic., Y splitter and Cinch and Plug and Body. Well molded rubber standoffs everywhere, and a surprisingly robust feeling cable. At first I thought it was just your regular Teflon sheathed stuff but once I felt and inspected it, the cable appears to be braided cloth with a rubberized outer coating. These should wear very well. No noticeable microphonics either. As I don’t use a Mic. I will leave this aspect up to other reviewers.
     
     
    Source Details: 
    For this particular review I used my Shanling M5 coupled with an Aune B1 portable amp. My Files are all at Least 320kbps to 96khz high resolution files. I used this source in all comparisons.   
     
     
    Source Material:
    The following is a list of songs that I used in this review. Some I use all the time, some less frequently. They all contain some type of frequency, Detail, or EQ that make them suitable for reference.
     
    Christina Novelli -- Concrete Angel (Long Version)
    Christina Novelli – Save Me (Long Version)
    Weather Report --- Mysterious Traveler (various cuts)
    John Bryson --- Let the Pipes play (full pipe organ album 1[sup]st[/sup] Cut)
    Vivaldi – Four Seasons
    Dire Straits --- Sultans of Swing
    SOAK --- Immigrant Song
    Infected Mushroom --- Kipod
    Lee Rittenour --- 6 String Theory (various cuts)
    Mahavishnu Orchestra --- Birds of Fire
     
     
     
     
    General Sound Quality:
    They are a V Shaped EQ with a well-controlled and somewhat elevated Mid Bass. Some Sub Bass extension, some rumble, however it is maybe a little Loose on the basement floor. Nice Mids. Not too forward or so recessed that you can't make out vocals, just a nice neutral - ISH sweet spot. I tried some pretty sibilant stuff but the Highs are rolled off enough that it wasn't a Factor. Fair Detail and Micro Details. Rather smallish sound stage.  All in all a Pleasant, (albeit consumer-oriented), and what should be non-fatiguing listen for most.
     
     
     
    Bass:
     The sub-bass extension is Fair, and the X5 handles them with some questionable looseness. The Mid Bass, is somewhat elevated, and can bleed over a tad when presented with Bass-heavy material. Over all the Bass frequencies are fairly well-mannered if not average for a V shaped EQ.
     
     
    Mids:
    Mids Are in a nice place, maybe a little recessed but still good. They lack Upper airiness and Detail, which along with the rolled off Treble give the X5 a darker but certainly listenable presence.
     
     
    Treble:
    The Treble is… well, not harsh, piercing, or intrusive in any way. I find them to have a roll off  before the onset of brightness which lends them to a quite listenable, but helps to further accentuate a somewhat darker quality. They lack detail however.
     
     
     
    Photo of the 3 single driver IEMs in my brief comparison. I forgot to include the KZ ED9 in the family pic:

     
     
     
    Comparisons:
    As a week is just too, short of time for some burn-in and In-depth comparisons, I will give the Simple Facts, BUT THESE ARE MY PERSONAL OPINION ONLY, Please do not use this as a scale for opinions concerning purchasing as YMMV.
     
    Mixcder X5 > Memt X5
     
    Zero Audio Carbo Tenore > Mixcder X5 (Keep in mind the Tenores are about 2x $$$$)
     
    Mixcder X5 > KZ ED9 (bright brass filter)
     
     
     
    Conclusion:
    Price point, Construction, and Performance Equal a Budget product that competently does what an IEM is supposed to do. I can recommend this IEM as a good place to start in this hobby, Gym use, or even Daily commuters. Even if you are a seasoned listener.
  4. Wiljen
    4.5/5,
    "Mixcder has a winner here! - probably the most natural sounding budget headphone available."
    Pros - Very non-fatiguing sound profile, natural sounding, good accessories, great price
    Cons - would prefer a cable without the microphone and cable not detachable.
    First off, a heart-felt thank you to Mixcder for the chance to give these a try.   New gear is always fun and the opportunity to try out gear as it comes to market is indeed a privilege.    Mixcder provided me this sample pair in exchange for my unbiased review. 
     
     
    A short note about me:  I am a music enthusiast, and audio hobbyist.  I make no claim to have the level of experience of some here and quite frankly at times I wonder if I really belong.  Not to say I don’t share the interests here, but the budget is something I will likely not have anytime soon. Kids in college and Veterinary school mean my dabbling is rather low end and I wonder if I had $5000 to spend on hardware if I would really be able to enjoy the difference in sound quality or if I would constantly be nagged by the cost.   I tend to be quite pragmatic.  Some of you may remember a review in which I ran a set of Fiio earbuds through the laundry to see if they would survive.   I intend to review the X5 with a similar pragmatic approach (albeit I’ll spare them the laundromat).
     
     
    Review Proper:
    The X5 arrived in a typical manila padded envelope and made the journey intact.   I will give partial credit to the USPS and partial to Mixcder for a good solid box and the carry case inside it that provided extra rigidity.
     

     
     
    [​IMG]
        
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Accessories:
                   In a word, impressive.   Again, considering the asking price, the accessory package is better than most.  The carrying case is  very functional and durable.  Two sets of earhooks are not usually included at this price point nor is a clip to keep the cable in place while jogging. The downfall if there was one was the eartips.  It came with s,m,l tips and one set of double flanged tips.  It would have been a nice touch to include either a set of foam tips or the double flanged in all three sizes like the other set of  tips.
    [​IMG]
     
    Build Quality:            
                   Build quality was solid throughout.  The case was well made and feels durable, the earphones themselves are very solid being made of aluminum.  The cable is reminiscent of the Senfer DT cable or the upgrade cable for the KZ ZST or Z3 and was well made.   Strain reliefs are a bit shorter than most but seem solidly made. 
     
    Microphone:
                     The microphone worked well for making calls and didn’t pick up a lot of extraneous noise.  It did suffer from the same issues with wind and rubbing on clothing as you walk that pretty much all in-line microphones do.  My personal preference is for cables without the microphone but I’m sure others will find it useful.
     
    Sound:  
                    I am a lover of blues, blues/rock, classic rock, and anything with good guitar work in it.  For that reason, I chose the following as my test tracks. (artist, album, track, thoughts)
     
    Stevie Ray Vaughan – Texas Flood – Lenny   (Guitar to die for but the thing I look for is the percussion.)
     
    Lindsey Buckingham – Fleetwood Mac, Best of  - Go Insane, Live   (Probably the most complicated simple song you’ll ever hear, all about nuance and subtleties with this track).
     
    Johny Lang – Lie to me – Lie to Me  (Looking for tight bass, bleed over into the mids, and controlled sub-bass)
     
    Tedeschi Trucks – Let me get by – I want more  (Female Vocals, backing brass band)
     
    The Blasters -  Testament – Blue Shadows (Saxophone and piano with male vocals)
     
    Vintage Trouble – The Bomb shelter sessions -  Blues hand me down  (Looking at attack speed and decay especially in bass and sub-bass.  This track gets muddy quick if the equipment can’t handle it.)
     
     
    Bass:                     
    Good bass impact and definitely emphasized overall with a moderate mid-bass hump.  Sub bass is present in good quantity and is reasonably controlled although it can get a bit loose at higher volumes. 
     
    Mids:                   
    Very good separation in the mids and very natural presentation of both electric and acoustic guitar.   One of the more believable headphones I have heard for reproducing Stevie Ray’s guitar.   Buckingham’s vocals on Go Insane are full and more detail than expected came through.
     
    Treble:                
    Somewhat rolled off but in a good way.  Treble is polite and well mannered.  The high-hat that I listen for and the snare in Lenny are very well defined and clear.   I went through some additional tracks with pronounced female vocals that usually get sibilant and couldn’t make these sibilant without introducing a lot of EQ.
     
     
     I want to say these have a V shape sound profile but they don’t.  What they have doesn’t match a letter of the alphabet.  If you imagine a letter that has the first half of a capital V and the second half of the lowercase v you have the profile these headphones exhibit.   They are definitely bass heavy and mildly rolled off at the top end.   Sound stage is crowded as one would expect from a closed in ear but instrument separation is better than expected with this small a soundstage.   Detail and even micro detail is more present than expected and easily better than anything I own in the sub $100 category.   If I had to summarize these in a word it would be “natural”.  Not neutral, but a very realistic reproduction of guitars and vocals.  The Bari sax and the Tenor share that same quality but alto sax suffers a bit from the rolled off top end and doesn’t sound as natural as those in the lower registers.   They make for a very non-fatiguing listening session and combined with the comfortable fit could be a good all-day earphone. 
     
     It should also be noted that not only do these not need amping, they are actually hurt by it.  When using the E17 alone or with the e09k noise was very obvious and distracting.  These are simply too sensitive for use with any amp I had available to test with.   This is by no means a strike against the X5 as they worked well when plugged directly into a phone or a DAP (I did play a few songs on a Xduoo X10 just to see how they’d do) and this is exactly the segment of the market they are targeting.  Most people won’t use a sport headphone with a high-power amp.
     
    Comparisons:
     
    With an asking price of <$20 on Amazon, the X5 falls squarely in the class of “Device replacements”.  To me this class is generally divided into two sub-categories.  The first is “I broke what came with my device” and the second is “What came with my device utterly sucks, I gotta get something better”.
     
    I decided to use those two categories as the basis for comparison.  I drove all the headphones with an HTC m9, and I-phone 6s, and a laptop using a Fiio E17/E09k combination as these seem like very likely use cases for the X5.
     
    In category 1, I compared the X5 to the headphones that came with a Sony Discman, two generations of apple buds that came with I-Phone 4 and 6s, and the earphones that came with my HTC M9.
     

     
    I-phone 4S -    The earbuds that came with the 4s fall in the “These suck” category as they lack anything that even resembles bass so it was really no contest.  The X5 has a much better sound profile than the 4s.
     
    I-phone 6S -    Although a clear improvement over the buds that came with the 4s the 6s buds still lack bottom end and suffer from bleed over into the mids.  Again, the X5 is a clear improvement in sound quality.
     
    Discman -    The discman were better than I remembered and bested the I-phone buds but still lacked the bass impact of the X5 and didn’t show any sub-bass at all.   The X5 was an easy winner in that the bass and isolation were markedly better.
     
    HTC -     Isolation was about equal with the X5 but sound profile is very different.  The HTC needs heavy EQ to be listenable and is very fatiguing without that adjustment.   Winner – X5.   Even with adjustments I couldn’t make the HTC sound as natural as the X5.
     
    At less than $25 US, they are a no-brainer as a replacement for the headphones that come with most consumer devices.
     
    In category 2, compared the X5 with other would be improvements in the <$35 range.  In this class I had several KZs (ATE, ED9, ZST), a Fiio EM3, Senfer DT, and the Monoprice 9927 snails.
     

     
    Fiio EM3  - while the EM3 is a good bud in the same price range, it lacks the isolation and thus the bass of the X5.  I think for those who prefer the earbud style the EM3 or VE Monk are going to be tough to beat.  For those who want more bass and better isolation the X5 gets the nod.  (Not really a good comparison as too much difference in designs).
     
    Senfer DT   -  the Senfer suffers from the same issue the HTC did.  It can sound really good, but not without heavy EQ and even then, it suffers from bass bleed into the mids.  The X5 was more natural, less fatiguing and easily the winner when tested without EQ.
     
    Monoprice 9927 - Here we have the first close call.  The 9927 needs no introduction as the $7 wonder but its shortfalls are also equally well known.  The x5 is an easy fit for everyone in my family and several of the people in the house find the 9927 uncomfortable.   Ultimately though it was the very audible 3KHz resonance of the 9927 that gave the win to the X5.  
     
    KZ ATE  -    This is probably the headphone in the KZ line that most closely approximates the sound profile of the X5.  It has a pleasant V shaped profile, isn’t particularly sibilant, and doesn’t suffer the fit issues of the 9927.   What it couldn’t do was be as clear as the X5.  The ATE suffers from bleed over and a very pronounced mid-bass hump (more so than the X5).  I found on Lie to Me and Blues Hand me down the details were much better on the X5 than on the ATE.  The ATE tended to get muddy on Blues hand me down as it is a very busy track and heavily slanted toward bass and mid-bass.
     
    KZ ED9  -   I normally use the neutral nozzles but to mimic the X5, I replaced them with the bass heavy versions.  In that configuration, the ED9 comes very close to the X5.   So much so that when listening to the same tracks repeatedly I was having trouble remembering which earphone I was using for each pass.   On sound alone, this is a dead tie.   The X5 takes the win based on construction as I have had two pairs of the ED9s break due to poor QC and a bad strain relief design.    
     
     
    KZ ZST -  This was my toughest call no doubt.  I really wanted to do both justice and have listened to the ZST a lot as my evening walk companion and the ZST has been the earphone I carry with my phone nearly daily for some time.   For that reason, I gave the X5 a solid 3 days of listening at the office, during my evening walks with the dogs, and general listening.   After nearly a  week, I’m still not sure there is a clear winner in all circumstances.
     
              Construction:  Winner – X5.  Even though the ZST comes with removable cables, its plastic construction and the stock cable are no match for the X5 in materials quality.
     
              Bass:      Winner ZST.    Although the X5 was a bit cleaner, it had considerably less bass and sub-bass than the ZST.  If you are a basshead, the ZST is going to put a smile on your face.  If you prefer more balance – probably not so much.
     
              Treble – Winner X5.  The rolled off, polite treble of the X5 stands in pretty stark contrast to the sibilant, poor behaved treble of the ZST (unless EQ’d).  If listening for long periods, the X5 is much more pleasant and less fatiguing.
      
               Mids -  Winner X5, the ZST suffers from bass that bleeds into the mids on some tracks and the upper mids are recessed.  The X5 was cleaner and less recessed.
     
     
    OVERALL:
    The Mixcder X5 is an easy recommendation.  When considering the retail price, that becomes an even stronger recommendation.  They are easily better than anything that typically comes packaged with consumer devices and have better sound quality than many models costing twice as much or more.    I was pleasantly surprised by how natural sounding the guitars were and the level of detail the X5 presents.    I appreciate the chance to try out the X5 and I can promise Mixcder that they won’t end up in the drawer.  These make a good earphone for my evening walks and will probably continue in that role until one of the kids discovers them and they disappear (an all too frequent event around here).
     
     
     
     
  5. B9Scrambler
    4.0/5,
    "Mixcder X5: Budget All-Star"
    Pros - Build and materials - Well-tuned signature - Generous and high quality accessories
    Cons - Mic placement makes over-ear wear less then ideal - Treble is a little rough around the edges
    Greetings Head-fi!
     
    Not long ago 20 bucks wouldn't get you far in the world of portable audio. Mediocre build quality, few accessories, and most importantly, terrible sound were the standard. You got what you paid for; not much.
     
    Today's landscape in the world of portable audio is a vastly different place. Instead of wading through a sea of waste and settling on the best of the worst, we are spoiled with quality options that would have been unthinkable just a short time ago; sub-20 dollar hybrids with removable cable, dual-dynamic drivers, impeccably built metal housings, cables and cases that feel like they sucked up the entire cost of the item you bought, custom-styled housings, and more. With a number of worthy purchases cropping up seemingly every week, it's getting more and more challenging to sort the champs from the chumps.
     
    Today's earphone, the Mixcder X5, takes aims and shoots for the top echelon of budget earphones. Let's check them out together, shall we?
     
    Disclaimer:
     
    I would like to thank Denise at Mixcder for sending over a complimentary copy of the X5 for the purposes of this review. I am not receiving any financial compensation for these writings. The thoughts within do not represent Mixcder or any other entity, and are simply my thoughts and observations of the X5 after spending a week and many hours listening to them. Speaking of a week, this is less time than I prefer to spend reviewing a headphone. Should my thoughts and feelings change in the future as I continue to use and compare the X5 with other similarly priced earphones, I will be sure to update and adjust the review accordingly.
     
    You can check out the X5 here on Mixcder.com; https://www.mixcder.com/mixcderr-x5-wired-eaphone.html
     
    I'm a 30 year old professional working for what is currently the largest luxury hotel chain on the planet. I have a background in Psychology which probably explains my somewhat dry writing style. My entry into the world of portable audio was due primarily to a lack of space for a full-sized stereo system during my university years, and truly began with the venerable JVC HA-FXT90. After reading pretty much the entirety of IjokerI's multi-earphone review thread, reviews from other established reviewers, and thus being greatly inspired, I took a chance and started writing my own.
     
    Fast forward a couple years and I'm thankful to have had the opportunity to write about products for wonderful companies like RHA, Accutone, ADVANCED, NarMoo, Mixcder, Brainwavz, Meze and many more. I don't do it for money or free stuff, but because this is my hobby and I enjoy it. If my reviews can help guide someone to a product that makes them happy, I'll consider that a job well done and payment enough.
     
    Gear used for testing was a Shanling M1, HTC One M1, Topping NX1 portable amplifier, and my aging Asus G73 gaming laptop paired with a Creative SoundBlaster Recon3D usb amp. I listen primarily to various EDM sub-genres (liquid drum and bass, breakbeat, drumstep, etc.), hip hop, and classic rock. While I enjoy a variety of signatures I generally lean towards slightly warm with elevated treble and sub-bass, an even mid-range response, and reduced mid-bass, though lately I've been enjoying more mellow and relaxed products with a bass tilt. My favorite in-ears, the Echobox Finder X1 with grey filters installed and the Fischer Audio Dubliz Enhanced are good examples of my preferred signatures.

     
     

     
               
     

     
    Packaging and Accessories:
     
    Mixcder's ShareMe series of Bluetooth headphones always had the environment in mind with the design and construction of their packaging, This environmentally conscientious philosophy carries over to the X5. The compact cardboard packaging, 4 5/8" x 2 3/4" x 1 3/4", is adorned with an eye-pleasingly retro design with a sky-blue and white color scheme that reminds me of something you would have found in the late 60s, early 70s.
     
    Opening the package you're greeted by an elongated hard clam-shell carrying case that's a bit smaller than the one included on the ANC-G5, but still plenty spacious. A miniature carabiner is attached to a fabric loop on one end. The instruction manual is slotted in behind the case and outlines everything you would expect; mic controls, 1 year warranty info, etc. Inside the case you find a plethora of accessories.
     
    - cable clip
    - single flange silicone tips (s/l, medium pre-installed)
    - one pair of dual-flange tips
    - two pairs of stabilizing ear hooks (s/l)
     
    The quality of the ear tips and ear hooks are quite good and while I did swap out the tips for something else, the included sets feel durable and seal well. For most I suspect there won't be any need to replace them.
     
    Overall the unboxing experience is very basic, but the included accessories are of good quality. The ear hooks are a nice bonus and quite welcome.
     

     
               
     

     
    Design, Build, Comfort, and Isolation:
     
    I've been quite impressed with Mixcder's designs and build quality for the most part. The ShareMe 5 and Pro looked and felt nice in the hand with excellent ergonomics, with the same being said for their ANC-G5 noise canceling in-ear. The X5 carries on the tradition and is pretty impressive for a product in this sub-20 USD category.
     
    The aluminum alloy housings are light and durable with good fit and finish, though the seams where the bottom face plate facing your ears could be more flush with the rest of the housing. The silver ring cut into the back can also be a bit sharp, but you have to really press your finger into it to notice; not something you would be doing in normal use.
     
    The cable is outstanding with a flexible, noise, and memory resistant PU (polyurethane) sheath covering the wires twisted within. The inclusion of a chin cinch is nice, though it's hard to slide along the cable as resistance is a touch high. I was very pleased to see that the cable retains the same gauge throughout the entire length instead of thinning above the y-split leading towards the housings. Strain relief is quite effective overall, but could be a touch longer at the y-split and in-line mic. This would improve it's effectiveness in two areas that are often failure points.
     
    I found the X5 exceptionally comfortable given the broad stature forced upon them by their large ~12.5 mm drivers. I was expecting them to be a shallow fit earphone due to the shape and past experience with the ANC-G5, but nope. They've got a fairly long nozzle stem at 7 mm which will help ensure an easy and consistent fit for most. The nozzle itself is 5 mm wide which means the X5 is compatible with a wide variety of aftermarket tips; handy if you lose the stock pairs or enjoy trying out different tips to maximize comfort and/or performance. Comply users will be happy to know that 400 series tips are nice and snug and in my experience, don't affect the sound much beyond softening up the treble a touch. One thing to note is that the in-line control module is placed quite far up the cable putting it behind your ear if you choose to wear the X5 cable up. Not ideal.
     
    The X5 is vented in two locations and as expected, the resulting isolation properties are pretty average. Not unexpected from a dynamic driver based earphone. They are fine for dulling the sounds of keyboards clacking in the background, voices, city noises, etc, but won't be isolating you completely from your surroundings.
     
    Overall the X5 is well-designed, put together with precision using quality materials, has comfort in the bag, and isolates decently well. No concerns here, except possibly the placement of the remote which makes cable up wear far from ideal.
     

     
               
     

     
    Mic/Remote Performance:
     
    The X5's mic is excellent giving viewers a pretty accurate image of your voice without much background noise seeping in. You come across clear and detailed, though I found vocals a touch thick. Still, it was good enough to use while recording audio for a couple videos, and is one of the better in-line mics I've come across. This is a great mic for phone calls.
     
    The single button remote works as expected, able to answer and end calls, start/stop and skip through music tracks, etc. The button depresses with an appealing tactile 'snap' that ensures there is no question about whether or not you pressed it.
     
    Overall the inline controls and mic work pretty much flawlessly. It would be nice if it were a three button unit, but not necessary.
     
    Sound:
     
    Mixcder dialed in a fun, warm-ish, v-shaped signature with the X5. They've got some thunk in the trunk and good extension up top, thankfully without sacrificing mid-range clarity and presence. It's the sort of sound that wows upon first listen, yet remains entertaining even once you've become accustomed to their presentation.
     
    The X5's treble is a touch on the dry side which takes the impact out of sparkly or shimmering effects. It's also a bit grainy on anything but the cleanest of recordings. Detail retrieval and clarity are above average for a budget single dynamic, having no issues picking out and separating nuanced details in recordings.
     
    These positive qualities continue through to the X5's midrange which despite being slightly recessed is very crisp, though still with a touch of graininess. Ts and Ss occasionally lack definition and come across a bit harsh. I think that's less the earphone and more the recording given it is inconsistent track to track. Separation is excellent, allowing vocals to stand out and play within their own distinct space. The X5's presentation seems to favor male vocals and live instruments making listening to recordings from groups such as Jethro Tull, King Crimson, Soil, and others an absolute joy.
     
    The X5's low end isn't lacking either, able to put out some solid rumble when asked. I truly appreciate that Mixcder didn't dial in a huge mid-bass hump, giving it's solid sub-bass extension equal billing. It's also pretty quick with slightly faster than natural decay. Some extra linger on heavy bass hits would be welcome, made up for with a very textured and punchy sound.
     
    A large and accurate soundstage isn't in the cards, but I also never found the X5 claustrophobic. Sound has a very defined space to play within, with clear layering and imaging qualities and a noise free background. They do have a somewhat odd quality, however. As sound moves away from you, it always seems to shift down and back, petering out behind me at the further edge of my collarbone. As a result the X5's soundstage comes across as an inverted v (^) in shape.
     
    Overall the X5 is an entertaining and capable sounding earphone that would really benefit from a more natural soundstage presentation.
     

     
               
     ​
    Earphone stand provided courtesy of ​
     

     
    Select Comparisons:
     
    SoundPEATS B10 (11.99 USD): The B10 shares a v-shaped signature with the X5, but is warmer and smoother with more of a mid-bass hump that at times can be a bit invasive. The B10's treble extension seems to flatten out earlier than on the X5 making it less fatiguing. Mid-range and treble clarity and detail are about on par, with the X5's bass bringing a more dynamic and punchy presentation to the table.
     
    Build and material quality on the X5 is leaps and bounds beyond what the B10 offers which is more in line with mainstream budget offerings like the Panasonic HJE-120. Comfort goes to the B10 as it weighs next to nothing and is notably smaller and more compact. I also prefer the included tips which are very similar to those that come with numerous JVC earphones.
     
    FiiO F1 (14.99 USD): No question, I find the X5 a much better listen than the F1. Clarity and detail across the board is more impressive on Mixcder's offering with the benefit of improved extension at either end. The F1 sounds quite veiled in direct comparison but benefits from a more natural soundstage presentation and prominent mid-range.
     
    Build quality on the earpieces goes to the X5. Fit and finish is slightly better and the choice to go with aluminum gives them a more premium feel. As much as I like the style of cable selected for the X5, the F1's amazing cable and control module would be quite at home on a much more expensive product. The F1 is slightly more comfortable.
     
    Vodabang VD01 (15.99 USD): The X5 and VD01 are a solid sonic match. They are tonally quite similar with nearly the same tuning balance. The VD01 is the stronger performer in my opinion as they have a larger soundstage without the odd stage qualities of the X5, along with a more airy, tighter, and more sparkly treble presentation.
     
    Build quality once again goes to the X5, without question. Except at the poorly constructed y-split which is two pieces of cheap feeling plastic glued together, the VD01 feels perfectly fine for the price. But, set it beside the X5 though and the cable comes across slightly rubbery and bouncy, microphonics are much more present, and strain relief is mediocre except at the excellent 90 degree angle jack. I definitely prefer the VD01's design though as it very clearly takes inspiration from the Audio Technica CKW100ANV, one of the most organic and beautiful earphones out there in my opinion.
     
    Mixcder ANC-G5 (59.99 USD): The ANC-G5 is brings great sound to a reasonably inexpensive and effective noise canceling earphone. The X5 certainly shares some basic traits with the G5, but I don't think the G5 has anything to worry about. A) because they don't even remotely compete with each other when looking at price, features, etc. but also B) because the G5 offers up superior sonic performance, and not by a small margin.
     
    It's much smoother and more refined with a cleaner treble presentation, tighter, punchier bass, and a similarly prominent but more refined mid-range. It's soundstage is also notably more spacious and open, completely dwarfing the X5. The X5 simply sounds less refined when A/Bing the two. Given the significant price gap between them, I'd expect improved performance from the G5 and thankfully it doesn't disappoint.
     
    Once again, build goes to the X5. The all-metal housings are more cleanly constructed than the G5's plastic/aluminum combo. The G5's cloth cable is also subject to fraying, but both are similarly well-relieved. I personally prefer the G5's built-in adjustable earhooks but they can't be removed unlike the silicone add-ons for the X5. If you find the hooks on the G5 uncomfortable, you're stuck with them.
     

     
               
     

     
    Final Thoughts:
     
    Five years from now I can see the X5 being referenced in a "What should I buy next?" help thread by someone who has been using it as their daily driver for the last five years, finally looking for a replacement. While only time will tell, I'm given the impression it is a product that will provide buyers many years of enjoyment before it eventually succumbs to the rigors of regular use.
     
    It seems to do a lot right and very little wrong making it well worth your time if in the market for a good sounding, well-built earphone that's not going to break the bank. They're made from durable materials that are backed with good build quality. The cable, often a point of concern for budget products, is not only tough and durable in itself, but is properly relieved which will only extend it's life further. The included accessories are all made from nice materials and perfectly functional. Nothing feels cheap (except maybe the cable clip) or like it was tossed in for the sake of increasing perceived value.
     
    I do wish the X5 was a little smoother and more refined in the treble regions and to fit in better with my personal preferences, a touch warmer in the mid-range. Keeping in mind this is a sub-20 USD earphone, these are VERY minor concerns as their performance overall is above what many products at this price provide. Overall Mixcder has done a wonderful job with the X5.
     
    Thanks for reading!
     
    - B9Scrambler
     
    ***** ***** ***** ***** *****
     
    Test Tracks:
     
    Aesop Rock - Saturn Missles
    BT - The Antikythera Mechanism
    The Crystal Method - Grace (feat. LeAnn Rimes)
    Daft Punk - Touch
    Gramatik - Bluestep (Album Version)
    Incubus - 2nd/3rd/4th Movements of the Odyssey
    Infected Mushroom - Deeply Disturbed
    Infected Mushroom - The Legend of the Black Shawarma
    Jessie J - Bang Bang
    Kiesza - Hideaway
    King Crimson - Starless and Bible Black
    Pink Floyd - Money
    Run The Jewels - Oh My Darling (Don't Cry)
    Skindred - Death to all Spies
    Supertramp - Rudy
    The Prodigy - Get Your Fight On
    Witcher 2 Official Soundtrack
  6. LNuneek
    4.5/5,
    "A Wired Sport Earphone That Crushes The Competition With It's Unmatched Value. "
    Pros - Excellent value, performance & build quality for the price. Bass quality & quantity. Clarity exceeded expectations. Accessories.
    Cons - Slighly harsh/cold midrange. Bulky design. Would have preferred an L shaped plug.
     
     
     
     
     
    I would like to start off this review by thanking Denise and the Mixcder staff for providing me with an opportunity to review one of their new products!​
     ​
     ​
     
    Introduction
     ​
    The X5 In-Ear Wired Sport Earphone is a product that is designed to be compatible with an active lifestyle, and is also satisfactory for anyone looking for a fun sounding bass forward earphone.
     
    Since this is an earphone that is primarily designed to be used on the go, and the price point suggests it's intended market is the average consumer, I used these headphones in the manner of what a non-hardcore audiophile would. Plugged directly into an iPhone (no additional amp), listening to Apple iTunes m4a files, 320 kbps mp3 files, and Spotify as a streaming service.
     
    ​Design & Build
     
    The X5 are made with an aluminum alloy body which makes the earphones both durable and lightweight. The Y splitter and jack are made of the same material. The overall design is somewhat industrial looking due to the materials used and the diamond style etching on the Y splitter and jack. 
     
    The design elements come across as basic with a touch of class. Maybe a bit too basic. The cylindrical design of the earphones themselves, while giving a somewhat pleasing appearance, tends to make the body of the earphones a bit too bulky and big. I would have liked these to be a bit smaller. 
     
    Branding is done with class as well with just the Mixcder logo on the back of the microphone control box. No over the top branding, which I like.
     
    I would have preferred an L shaped jack instead of a straight one.
     
    Overall, I find the build quality to be superb for the price. No issues here. Cables seem strong, and are about as thick as one can go before becoming too bulky and heavy. The rubber strain relief on the jack and earphones seems sufficient. The microphone control box seems sturdy and the function button feels durable, is easy to locate/feel, and has a satisfying "click" when pressed.
     
    Accessories
     
    This is where the unmatched value of the whole X5 package starts to come into play. Mixcder provides a generous amount of accessories with the X5.The accessories are well made and are of a higher quality than one would expect given the price.
     
    There is 3 pairs of single flanged ear tips included in sizes small, medium (X5 is shipped with the medium installed), and large. There is also a single pair of bi-flanged tips included as well. The medium sized single flange tips is what I decided to stick with even though I found the bi-flange pair to be the most comfortable. I found the bi-flange tips changed the sound signature subduing the bass slightly. I prefer the more pronounced bass that the single flange tips provide.
     
    2 pairs of sport ear hooks are included as well. Sized small and large. They are made of a thick soft rubber. Size small worked perfectly for me. This is my first time actually trying ear hooks and it took me a little while to figure out what angle I need to have them on the earphones so when I put them in my ears the strain relief was facing straight down and the hooks would be right where I needed them to be. They were comfortable, and did the job of keeping the earphones in place in my ears.
     
    The included zipper case is made of what I think is neoprene, a very durable material. What I really like about this case is that it has a mesh pocket inside to store the other accessories in. The zipper itself has a nice sized handle. No fumbling around to find that. The case also has a carabiner installed.
     
    Lastly, there is a plastic shirt clip with a swiveling hook that you can attach to the cable to make sure the cable stays in place and is out of your way. This is the only piece of the package where I think durability may be a concern, but it's made well enough for what it is.
     
    ​Sound
     
    The X5 are a very efficient earphone, and sound great plugged directly into my phone. The loudest I ever needed them to be is maybe two clicks past 50% volume on an iPhone. They are sealed very well, don't leak much sound, and are good at blocking out external noise.
     
    Bass is powerful, punchy, and warms up the sound considerably. I can feel the X5 rumble in my ears. Good extension to the bass. I found the bass to be very musical. No one note bass thumps. I get a sense of detail in the bass and can distinguish different layers within the tones. The bass is my favorite aspect of the sound.
     
    Midrange is forward as well, and gives the sound a sense of clarity that I wasn't expecting. Usually headphones in this league tend to have the mids scooped much more. Not the case here. I'm not altogether pleased with the midrange, although. I find the midrange to be just a tad harsh, a little muddled, and cold sounding. This somewhat clashes with the warmth of the bass. It makes the overall sound signature slightly odd, because the sound can be both warm and cold at the same time. It's not a deal breaker, which should be obvious by my ratings. Just something I notice. I am midrange sensitive and therefore prefer a warmer midrange.
     
    The highs are present and clear, but a bit subdued. I would have liked more sparkle in this area.
     
    Sound separation is good. I can clearly identify the different instruments, vocals, and tones.
     
    Soundstage is average. Not too narrow. Not wide.
     
    Call quality is good. No issues with hearing the conversation. No issues being heard.
     
    Despite some criticism when it comes to the sound I am still very pleased with the sound over all. The X5 is musical, fun, and provides more clarity than I was expecting at this price point. Throughout the years I have tried quite a few IEM's in this league and the sound of the X5 is much more satisfying than any other earphone I have listened to in this price range.
     
    ​Conclusion
     
    Mixcder put together a great package at a bargain price. Definitely unmatched value as far as I'm concerned. Taking into consideration the included accessories, build quality, sound that punches above it's weight, and a price that can't be beat, I recommend this earphone wholeheartedly.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     ​
     ​
     ​
  7. Pikrypton
    4.0/5,
    "quality sound, great design earbuds for a relatively inexpensive price"
    Pros - Lightweight, accessories, great sound
    Cons - lack of volume control, wires seem to be a bit thin
    Notes:
    I used these earbuds mainly on the bus during my commute and will later use them while working out to see how they hold up. 
    I mostly listened to movie soundtracks and hip hop music while either on the Surface 3 Pro (Windows 10) or on the OnePlus 3 device (Android 7.0). 

    Accessories and Design:
    I believe the Mixcder X5 exceeds expectations in this area. The product comes with a sturdy looking case and a carabiner. This is very nice to carry the earbuds around while keeping the safe,
    Additionally, there are three different sizes of ear tips, two sizes of ear hooks, and a small clip. 
    The combination of the ear hooks and earbud design keeps the earbuds in my ear. I don't have much trouble with the earbuds falling out of my ear.
    The only problem I had was that  the earbuds felt slightly bulky in my ear, but I assume my ears are smaller than average. 
    The earbuds feel sturdy and the wires seem durable. However, for me, the wires are a little too thin and round which resulted in some minor tangle issues. 
    Overall, the earbuds felt really light and I could easily wear them for extended hours without feeling extra weight. 

    Sound:
    I will be comparing the Mixcder X5 with the Skullcandy Ink'd 2 Wired earbuds since both are similar in pricing and claim to have quality sound. 
    The first thing I noticed was that these earbuds seem to block out exterior noises. If a person is  having a regular conservation, I can barely hear them and closer sounds are muffled. 
    I'm not an avid music listener, but after listening to some songs, I find that the lows, mids, and highs are relatively neutral.
    The vocals are distinct and the overall sound is very comfortable to listen to.
    There does not seem to be any static or breaks throughout the listening experience. 

    Summary: 
    Overall, the Mixcder X5 Wired are a fantastic pair of inexpensive, quality-sounding earbuds.
    If you prefer earbuds that block out most outside noises, this is great.
    For what you get in the box and the build quality of earbuds, these are much better than earbuds with similar pricing. 
  8. kimvictor
    4.0/5,
    "Cheap, Replaceable, and Exciting"
    Pros - Forward Signature, Price, Fit, Accessories
    Cons - Peak, Sound Stage

    Introduction

     
    It has been a while since I published a review on Head-fi. For the last few years, I’ve been occupied writing reviews for higher end IEMs for another website. Nevertheless, I was recently approached by a representative from Mixcder, asking me to join a group of reviewers reviewing their new low-end IEM, the X5. While I’ve moved on to higher end IEMs, I nevertheless take joy in owning a handful of lower-end IEMs as they are easily replaceable. For instance, I would never carry my CIEMs on me on a rainy day or when I’m working out, and this is where lower end, aka “beater”, IEMs come in. However, even for “beater” IEMs, I believe that audio quality should be held to a certain standard. After all, we are all audiophiles.
     
    Before I start the review, I will openly and clearly state that the X5 was provided to me free of charge for review purposes and that I do not have any personal/business relations to Mixcder. On the other hand, I also warn the readers to take my review with a grain of salt as I merely spent a week with the X5. I generally prefer to have at least two weeks of use before I publish a review, but Mixcder requested that I write a review within a week or so.
     

     

    Review

     
    The X5 arrives in a simple white/blue box, somewhat reminiscent of Amazon’s frustration free packaging. The box opens easily, and the contents of the box, while not displayed pompously, are organized and packed well. The X5 ships with a sturdy hard shell case, a cable clip, four pairs of ear tips (including a pair of double flange), and two pairs of ear guides.
     
    The case, which comes with a nifty small carabineer, can easily be attached to your backpack if you wish to do so. Frankly, I tend to shove my IEMs in my blazer pocket, so the case isn’t much use to me on a daily basis, but X5’s cases are, without a doubt, one of the more sturdy and roomy cases I’ve seen. The cable clip can be used to reduce touch noise or pulling, as the cables are on the stiffer side. However, since the IEMs themselves tend to fit rather well, I found the touch noise to be manageable even without the cable clip.
     
    The silicon tips included are fairly standard, although the blue termination at the bore end is a chic color choice. The included tips should fit most users, and if you find the medium sized tips to fit well, you should also give the double flanged tips a shot. Generally speaking, I find double flanged tips to isolate a tad bit more than single flanged tips. The ear guides, on the other hand, are one of the major selling points of the X5, in my opinion. Simply put, these ear guides work. They anchor the IEMs into your concha, as do CIEMs. In fact, I find the X5 with the ear guides to stay in my ears almost as well as my CIEMs do. Sure, a strong tug on the cables will dislodge the IEMs from your ears, but the X5 should stay in your ears even through your hardest workouts. This sturdy insertion also allows for a solid seal, providing decent isolation for a dynamic IEM. I estimate around 16dB of isolation (as a reference, Etys isolate up to 32dB and most BA IEMs isolate around 20-26dB).
     
    The IEMs also come attached with mic/remote combo found in many other IEMs. The remote functions perfectly on the Galaxy S7, and the buttons are clicky (whether this is a pro or a con would depend on the user preference). The mic was used multiple times in phone/skype calls, and no major issues were found. The X5 provides satisfying calling quality (although the mics were not as exceptional as that of Focal Sphears).
     
    On the other hand, the X5, while seemingly made for a smartphone, has an extremely low SPL of 83dB. Thankfully, the low(16ohm) resistance counteracts this, making the X5 driveable from a regular smartphone. The X5 also doesn’t seem to be impacted by high output impedance, given that OI is within a reasonable range(0-20ohm).
     
    In terms of sound, the X5 presents a forward, bass heavy sound.
     
    The lower end of the spectrum is boosted heavily; I suspect about 15dB with diffuse field compensation. That being said, the X5 has enough bass to satisfy most bass heads, except the most hardcore ones. Sub bass seems to extend as deep as my test tracks called for, and mid bass punches were powerful and satisfying. Decay is on the longer side, and the speed wasn’t as impressive as that of BA IEMs, yet, the X5 provides a satisfying, echoing bass.
     
    I was initially a little worried about the transition from bass to mids, as strong bass tends to bleed into the mids, making the vocals/guitars sound muffled. Generally speaking, I found no significant bass bleeds, although the bleeding was noticeable on certain bass heavy tracks(Daft Punk’s Doin’ it Right, for instance). However, with a forward signature, the X5 also presents rich mids. Vocals are never recessed and are generally fun to listen to. However, if you speak from an audio absolutist point of view (disregarding the price), the X5’s mids are noticeably colored and grainy. Such coloration and grains are to be expected, and I found other IEMs in the similar price range (Soundmagics and Xiaomis, for instance), to have similar issues as well.
     
    While transitioning from mids to treble, I picked up a peak. Peaks are very common amongst IEMs(or any audio receiver really), so it wasn’t a surprise I picked one up. From the short time I’ve spent listening to the X5, I concluded that the peak was on the narrower side, although fairly tall. This, in other words, means that there is a small range of lower-treble frequency that will be significantly boosted, and hence will be shrill or sharp. I found this to be of no particular concern in most tracks, although the X5 really suffered on few tracks (Rolling Stone’s Rocks Off and Queen’s Don’t Stop Me Now, for instance). Upper treble seems to be decently extended, which is just enough for a $17 IEM.
     
    Overall clarity is decent, and details are ample. Keep in mind that this comparison is only valid for IEMs in similar price range. Overall sound is colored, although tastefully so. When I first heard the X5, I was reminded of (once mine) Sony XBA-Z5. The X5 has a similar forwardness to the sound as the Z5. If you enjoy a forward and engaging signature, you’ll find the X5 to suit you quite well. However, if you’re looking for a neutral or wide sounding IEM, the X5 might not be your cup of tea. Besides the peak, the only other issue I had with the X5 was the sound stage. Sound stage is small, especially for a dynamic IEM. Stereo separation is present, but the forwardness of the IEMs don’t allow for much breathing room, something I believe is necessary for a wide sound stage.
     
     

    Conclusion

     
    While I forced myself to listen to the technical aspect of the IEM for review/analysis purposes, I plan on ditched the objective side of the analysis to close this review.
     
    Whenever manufacturers ask me to review a product (especially lower end products), I always beg them to not bother sending the IEMs to me if they can't stand behind the sound quality, as it is really awkward to publish a bad review. Thankfully, I really do enjoy the X5. The X5, priced at $16.99, is cheap, sturdy, and fun. What more could you ask for in a lower end IEM? The X5 is, technically speaking, pretty good. But who cares about the technical capability of a $17 sports IEM? All of my IEMs in my current collection (except my “beater” collection) easily triumphs the X5 in terms of technicality, and most of the readers, I suspect, will own a higher end IEM. What matters is that the X5 is packed with forwardness that makes music exciting and joyful.
     

    References

    The following gears were used alongside with and as references for the review:
    Samsung Galaxy S7
    Astell & Kern Jr.
    Ultimate Ears Reference Monitors
    Focal Sphears
    Sennheiser HD800
    Xiaomi Pistons 3
    SoundMagic PL30
    LG Quadbeats 2
     


  9. pkshiu
    4.5/5,
    "Premium quality, good sounding headphones that is also very easy on the wallet"
    Pros - good sound quality, premium construction, comfortable
    Cons - lack of volume control on the remote

    X5 Review


    Introduction

     
    The X5 is a very interesting set of headphones. Consider its price point I started to look for flaws, but I cannot find any. I am doing A/B testing between the X5 and my Klipsch X11i. The Klipsch is better as I A/B test against known tracks for sure. But honestly I am just nitpicking at that point comparing it to a pair of headphone costing 10 times more.
     

    Physical Design

     
    All the solid parts of the X5 is build with some sort of light aluminum alloy, according to the product description. The material does feel very premium. Picking up the headphones, you will inevitably hear and see the earbuds clinked together with a satisfactory metal sound. I particularly like the metal feel of the mic and control unit. The single button click positively.
     
    The X5 comes with four total pairs of eartips. The plastic on the ear feel well made, soft and not too thin like other cheap brands. Mixcder also includes two pair of ear wings, but did not feel like I need them. The standard medium sized eartips fit me fine. While the earbuds are metal, it is not heavy and the earbuds stay on fine for me.
     
    The cable on the X5 is coated with a shiny textured materials. This is perhaps the only thing that I do not like about the X5. Initially it gives off some chemical smell.
     
    Finally the X5 comes with a basic oblong shaped carrying case. While the case is basic, I am glad that it is not the usual small circular case. The case is large enough to fit the X5 comfortably. I do not have to wind the cable up too tightly for it to fit.
     

    Controls

     
    The single button control means that you have to use click patterns to navigate. Single click toggles between pause and click. Double click moves to the next track. Triple click moves to the previous track. When plugged into my Mac or my iPhone 7, long press brings up Siri. The lack of volume up and down buttons on the control is perhaps my only complain with the X5. Since the typical use for the X5 will be mobile, having to reach for the volume on the phone each time seems like extra work.
     

    Sound Quality

     
    I tested the X5 with my Retina Macbook Pro, and with my iPhone 7. I needed to use my lightning port adaptor with the iPhone 7. I uses my Klipsch X11i as a comparison during the listening tests:
     
    Trust, Christina Perri 2014: This tracks has a repetitive strumming of guitars playing against Perri’s raw vocal. While the bass is not over powering, the X5 has to work to keep the vocals clear, which it does. I can hear the nuance of her voice coming through.
     
    A Thousand Year, Sting, 2000: A classic String song, kicking off with rumbling bass. The X5 reproduce them with ease. I was surprised how well the bass is on the X5. Perhaps it is the 12mm size driver. 
     
    Private Investigation, Dire Straits 1982: Moody vocals and multiple layers of bass, drums and more make this a great track for testing. The X5 renders the signature section where the marimba, the acoustic guitar and everything else build up and eventually faded away very well.
     
    I find the X5 very enjoyable. It is bassy without over kill. The highs are clear, slightly hash compare with the Klipsch. Soundstage is good. The X5 is more efficient than the Klipsch as well, making it a nice pair of IEM for use directly with a mobile phone.
     
    I used the X5 in a conference call running through my Macbook Pro and the other participants tell me that I sounded great. Since for me the earbuds fit my ear very well, the passive sound isolation is also very good.
     

    Conclusion

     
    I am very happy with the X5. The quality is an improvement over other mixcder headphones, notably the ANC-G5. The sound signature is fun. Sound quality is good. I like the premium feel of it. As a pair of affordably price IEM it is good. For the actual price point of $17 it is a great. Right now this will be my go to recommendation for sub $20 wired IEM.
     
    Disclaimer: I was provided a free review unit for review. Opinions expressed here are completely my own.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

  10. genclaymore
    4.0/5,
    "Good sounding IEM's "
    Pros - Comfortable,Different size hooks and tips,Light,controlled bass,Great seperation
    Cons - Highs are overly Detailed ,Sound Stage is kinda small
     
     
     
     
    I been  using  the Mixcder X5 for almost an day pairing it up with my LG Leon Smart phone, Which does a very good job with the X5's. When you open the box, inside you will see the carry case, which is small, It has a loop on the end which allows you to place it on your keys or belt, While still fitting inside of your pocket. Inside of it you will find different sizes of ear hooks and ear-tips including one that goes deeper into your ears. The case in my hands felt good enough to keep your IEMs safe while not in use, doesn’t feel like it will smash down or any thing if you put weight on it.
     
     
     
     
     

     
     
    The cable is not remove-able but that isn't a deal breaker, But I feel that would had been useful to have to swap from the default smartphone cable to something else. Control box located on the right side is where the button for the mute/answer call and change song is. I did not have any issues with pressing the button know, But I do think it should be in a better place, such as being further down on the cable. Speaking of the cable, I fell it should be a bit more thicker, You don't want to be tough with the cable too much, what i do like is that it's not in the way when you are wearing the earphones, unlike another pair of IEMs which I do own that does. The built in mic worked very well, people didn’t have any issues hearing when I spoke thru it.
     
    The X5 are a nice size and the default ear-tip that was on them already, Fit nice in my ears while staying inside, tips was comfortable, I didn’t even feel any pressure from them in my ears. The cable was not heavy either, It was like I wasn’t wearing them. I haven’t tried the ear hooks due to never being able to get them on my ears regardless of which IEM’s I’m using. The sound isolation is good, while it isn’t total isolation, its enough to block out most of the noises, but my mechanical keyboard still makes it thru, but to be fair those keyboards can be very loud.
     
    Now the sound signature, as I mention before, my LG leon smartphone will be used as the source, So your results may be different then mind. The music player that I will be using on my phone is VLC player connected to my music server.
     
     
    Stephen Walking – Shark City
     
    This is one of my favorite songs that I tend to use in my reviews, which is good since if something is off, I will notice it right away. The first thing you notice with this song on the X5’s is that the highs are not dirty at all and can be heard clearly, the highs are also detailed, not too much, but just enough. There only a hint of brightness from what I can hear but it’s not enough to make my ears uncomfortable.
     
    So you are able to hear the tribal drums being hit and all of it tones including the piano and the hit hats, Which is not thin sounding at all. It has enough force behind it, while not having too much, if that makes sense.
     
    The bass is just right, which means it’s accurate and not out of control, also doesn’t add any thing to the song that is not there. But in this song it does have a little of an impact but nothing that causes it to be the main focus point of the song.
     
    Every instrument is separated from each other which means the instruments are not stepping on each other toes and you can hear each one, instead of blurring into each other.
     
    Over all sound really great with this song, the sound is outside of my head and not in.
     
     
    Aku – the Final Blow
     
    Similar to the shark city with the way it sound, the only difference is the bass and the drums are neutral, but still have some details to them as you can hear them very clear and their notes, including the piano and strings, nothing is thin sounding. The humming of the voices are projected from the center of you as if the person is in front of you. Over all every thing sound neutral while still having good separation.
     
     
    Space Laces – Say it ain’t So
     
    The first thing you notice is the synth, its very detailed maybe a bit too much then the bass which, hits hard with a bit of an impact, but at the same time it’s not muddy at all and does not take over the song. The hit hats even through they are hit softy, you can still hear them including the snares. Also have good separation like the other songs as nothing is hidden behind instrument’s or bleeding into the other freq.
     
    SubOxyde – Artillery Shells (Oolacile remix)
     
    As soon I hit play I was greeted by a good size sound stage, which I wasn’t expecting. The different sound effects are space out around the channel, You could close your eyes and pick out their location. Really good panning in this song, as you can hear the FX move around in the channel including the machine sounds. The bass hit harder in this song then the last one, still isn’t muddy. The hit hat’s and the snare are very detailed but you can easy hear them in this song.
     
    Summary
     
    Over all I found the X5 to work with a wide range of other songs that I tried such as Dub-step, While there was some songs that I found the highs to be a bit too detailed, others I found it to very good, Some songs did good with the sound stage and imaging others did not.
     
    There was no static, distortion or any clipping issues at all, when I was playing music thru them, every thing worked very nice. While it was detailed, the highs at times was too detailed. Which causes some of the songs to not sound right.
     
    EDIT 4/20/17: After burning them in and then giving them an listen, I notice the highs was brighter then before. Before it as thin sounding in the highs while being overly detailed. That what I notice so far, The rest of it have some small improvements here and there. I do have other IEM's one of them being Fiio F1 which isn't bright at all on my phone. It just isn't an good pairing with bright sources.

Cover Image

darmanastartes
B06XD6QTT7-411XseysmaL.jpg

Quick Stats

Wired Earphones, Mixcder X5 In-Ear Earbud Headphones Metal Housing with Mic, Noise Reducing for 3.5mm Audio Output iPhone and other Smartphones - Black, 11 votes
Author:
darmanastartes
Category:
Universal Fit
Views:
87
Images:
1
Reviews:
11
Comments:
0
Average User Rating:
4.09091/5, 11 votes
3 DOORS DOWN • 3 PILL MORNING • 9 LEFT DEAD • 30 SECONDS TO MARS • THE 1975 • A.R. RAHMAN • A DAY TO REMEMBER • A PERFECT CIRCLE • AARON CARTER • ABBY BAND • AC/DC • ACE OF BASE • ACERA • ADRIAN MICHAELS • ADAM 812 • ADAM LAMBERT • ADRIAN ECCLESTON • AEROSMITH • AGAINST THE CURRENT • THE ALBUM LEAF • ALEX CLARE & BAND • ALLI ROGERS • ALICE IN CHAINS • ALICIA KEYS • ALISTAIR TOBER • ALT-J • ALTER BRIDGE • ANDERSON PAAK • ANDRE O'NEAL, EARTH WIND AND FIRE • ANDRE3000 • ANDREW YEO • ANIMAL COLLECTIVE • ANNA VISSI • ANTHRAX • AMON AMARTH • ARCHITECTURE IN HELSINKI • ARIANA GRANDE • THE ARSENIO HALL SHOW • A$AP FERG • A$AP ROCKY • AS I LAY DYING • AS TALL AS LIONS • ASHLEY SIMPSON • AUDIO • AVENGED SEVENFOLD • AVRIL LAVIGNE • AWOLNATION • BAD RELIGION • BAD THINGS • BARENAKED LADIES • BARRY MANILOW • BASTILLE • BC JEAN • BELA FLECK • BELLA THORNE • BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME • BIGBANG • BIG TIME RUSH • BIG WRECK • BILLY CURRINGTON • BILLY ELLIOT TOUR • BILLY JOEL • BILLY OCEAN • BILLY TALENT BAND • BLACK FOOSS • BLANC FACES • BLINK 182 • BLOC PARTY • BLONDE REDHEAD • BLONDFIRE • THE BLOODHOUND GANG • BLUE MAN GROUP, ORLANDO • BLUE MAN GROUP, LAS VEGAS • BLUE MAN GROUP, MUNICH • BLUE MAN GROUP, NEW YORK • BOB SEGER • BON JOVI • BONNIE RAITT • BONOBO • BOSTON • BOUNCING SOULS • BOWFIRE BAND • BOYZ II MEN • BRAND NEW • BRANDY • BRANDY CARLILE • BRANDY CLARK • BRIAN MCKNIGHT • BRING ME THE HORIZON • BRITNEY SPEARS • BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN AND THE E STREET BAND • BRUNO MARS • BRYNN MARIE BAND • BRYSON TILLER • BUCKCHERRY • BULLET FOR MY VALENTINE • BUSH • BUTCH VIG • THE CAB • CADENCE • CAGE THE ELEPHANT • CARLY RAE JEPSEN • CARRIE UNDERWOOD • CATFISH AND THE BOTTLEMEN • CAVO • CEELO GREEN • CELINE DION • CELTIC WOMAN • CHAD GILMORE • CHARLI XCX • CHARLIE PUTS • CHEAP TRICK • CHELSEA GRIN • CHER • CHEVELLE • CHICAGO • CHILDISH GAMBINO • CHRIS HESSE, HOOBASTANK • CHRIS JERICHO • CHRIS ISAAK • CHRIS YOUNG • CHRISTINA AGUILERA • CHRISTINA PERRI & BAND • CHUCK AINLAY • CHVRCHES • CIRCA SURVIVE •
CIRQUE DU SOLEIL, IRIS • CIRQUE DU SOLEIL, KA • CIRQUE DU SOLEIL, MICHAEL JACKSON THE IMMORTAL WORLD TOUR • CIRQUE DU SOLEIL, VIVA ELVIS • CIRQUE DU SOLEIL, ZARKANA • CIRQUE DU SOLEIL, ZED • CIRQUE DU SOLEIL, ZUMANITY • CLEAN BANDIT • CLINT WILEY • CODY SIMPSON • COHEED AND CAMBRIA • COLE SWINDELL • COLIN JAMES BAND • COREY SMITH • COUNTING CROWS • THE COURTENEERS • CRAIG CAMPBELL BAND • CREED • CROWN THE EMPIRE • CRYSTAL FIGHTERS • THE CULT • THE CURE • CURT BISQUERA • D'ANGELO • DAN + SHAY • DANIEL POWTER • DARIUS RUCKER • THE DARKNESS • DARREN CRISS • DAUGHTER • DAUGHTRY • DAWES • DAVID LEE ROTH • DAVID NAIL BAND • DEAD BY SUNRISE • DEF LEPPARD • DEFTONES • DELTA GOODREM • DESTROID • DETHKLOK • THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA • THE DIAMONDS • DIERKS BENTLEY • DIRTY HEADS • DISCLOSURE • DISPATCH • DISTURBED • DIXIE CHICKS • DJ CASSIDY • DJ DON P • DJ N.I.N.O. • DNCE • DONNIE WAHLBERG, NKOTB • DONNY & MARIE • DOOBIE BROTHERS • DOWN WITH WEBSTER • DR FU • DRAGONETTE • DRAKE • DREAM • DREAM THEATER • DROPKICK MURPHYS • DURAN DURAN • THE EAGLES • EARTH, WIND AND FIRE • EASTON CORBIN • EDDIE VEDDER • ELIZA DOOLITTLE • ELLIE GOULDING • ELLY AND THE LAST GARAGE BAND • ELVIS COSTELLO • EMBER • EMBLEM3 • EMINEM • EMPHATIC • ENGLEBERT HUMPERDINCK • ENRIQUE IGLESIAS • ERIC BENET BAND • ESCAPE THE FATE • EVANESCENCE • EYE EMPIRE • FAILURE • FAITH EVANS • FAITH MARIE • FALL OUT BOY • FALLING IN REVERSE • FANTASIA • FATHER JOHN MISTY • FEIST • FIONA APPLE • THE FIT SWIMMERS • FIFTH HARMONY • FITZ & THE TANTRUMS • FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH • FLEETWOOD MAC • FLIPPIN' SOUL • FLORIDA GEORGIA LINE • FONESCA • FOO FIGHTERS • FOREIGNER • FOREWARNED • FOUR YEAR STRONG • THE FRAY • FRANK OCEAN • FRANK TURNER • FRENCH MONTANA • FRIGHTENED RABBIT • FUN. • FUTURE • GALLANT • GARBAGE • GARTH BROOKS • GARY ALLAN • GAVIN DEGRAW • GEORGE STRAIT • GHOST • GIBSON GUITAR STUDIO, LAS VEGAS • GLASS TIGER • GLEE LIVE TOUR • GLINT • GO RADIO • GODSMACK • GOO GOO DOLLS • THE GOSSIP • GRANGER SMITH • GREAT WHITE • GREEN DAY • GREYSON CHANCE •
GRIMES • GROOVEBOSTON • GROOVY7 • GROUPLOVE • GUNS N' ROSES • HALESTORM • HALFORD • HALSEY • HARVEY MARSHALL • HAWKSLEY WORKMAN • HAYDEN MARINGER • HEART • HELL YEAR • HERE COME THE MUMMIES • HILL KOURKOUTIS • HINDER • HOLLYWOOD UNDEAD • HOMBRES G • HOPE • HOW TO DESTROY ANGELS • HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON TOUR • HYPER CRUSH • I PREVAIL • ICONA POP • IGGY AZALEA • IMAGINATION MOVERS TOUR • IMAGINE DRAGONS • INGRID MICHAELSON • INTERPOL • INXS • IRATION • IRON MAIDEN • JACK JOHNSON • JAKE OWEN • JADE WARSHAW • JAMES TAYLOR • JAMES TORME • JAMIE FOXX • JANET JACKSON • JASON ALDEAN BAND • JASON BENGE • JASON BONHAM • JASON DERULO • JASON ISBELL • JASON WHITMORE • JAY SEAN • JC CHASEZ • JENNA ROBINSON, BIG APPLE CIRCUS • JENNIFER CHASE • JENNIFER HUDSON • JENNIFER STONE, WITH KESHA • JEREMIAH MCCONICO • JESSE MCCARTNEY • JIMMY BUFFET • JIMMY EAT WORLD • JOE.E • JOE JONAS • JOE NICHOLS BAND • JOEY BADA$$ • JOHN GRANT BAND • JOHN HIATT AND THE COMBO • JOHN MAYER • JOHN STAMOS • JOHN TEMPESTA • JOJO • JONATHAN KNIGHT, NKOTB • JORDIN SPARKS • JOSH DAY • JOSH GROBAN • JOSH GROBAN BAND • JOSHUA RADIN • JOSS STONE • JOURNEY • THE JOY FORMIDABLE • JOYWAVE • JUDAS PRIEST • JUDD HOOS • JUICY J • JULE VERA BAND • JULIO IGLESIAS • JULLY BLACK • JUSTIN BIEBER • JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE & BAND • KACEY MUSGRAVES • KAMILAH MARSHALL • KARMA • KARMIN • KAT DELUNA • KATE EARL BAND • KATY PERRY • KEITH SWEAT • KEITH URBAN • KELLIE PICKLER • KENDRICK LAMAR • KENNY CHESNEY & BAND • KENNY LOGGINS • KESHA • KIP MOORE • KISS • KLAYE SANDERS • KOOL & THE GANG • KORN • KROPP CIRCLE • LACUNA COIL • LADY GAGA • LALAH HATHAWAY • LAUREN WILEY, LES MISERABLES US TOUR • LAURYN HILL • LAWSON • LE REVE, WYNN LAS VEGAS • LEA MULLEN • LEE DEWYZE • LENNY KRAVITZ • LEON J • LEONA LEWIS • LIANNE LA HAVAS • LIBIDO • LIDO • LIGHTS OVER PARIS • LIL' KIM • LIL WAYNE • LIMP BIZKIT • LINDSEY STIRLING • LINKIN PARK • LIONEL RICHIE • LITTLE BIG TOWN • THE LIVING END • LOCAL NATIVES • LOU REED • LOVE AND THEFT BAND • LUCINDA WILLIAMS • LUIS MIGUEL •
THE LUMINEERS • M83 BAND • MAC MILLER • MACHINE GUN KELLY • MACHINE HEAD • THE MACCABEES • MAD HATTER STUDIOS • MADEON • MADLIFE • MADONNA • MAGIC! • MAJORS AND MINORS, TV SHOW • MANA • MANDY JIROUX • MARC ANTHONY • MARIAH CAREY • MARIANA'S TRENCH • MARILYN MANSON • MARINA AND THE DIAMONDS • THE MARKER • MAROON 5 • MARY J BLIGE BAND • MASTODON • MATCHBOX 20 • MATT & KIM • MATT MORRISON & BAND • MATT NATHANSON • MATT OCHOA • MAXWELL • THE MCCLAIN SISTERS • MEGADETH • MEGHAN TRAINOR • MEL B • MELANIE MARTINEZ • MELISSA ETHERIDGE • MICAPELLA • MICHAEL ANTHONY • MICHAEL BOLTON • MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD • MICHELLE OSBOURNE • MIDNIGHT OIL • MIGUEL • MIKA • MIKE PORTNOY • MILEY CYRUS • MIKE MARLIN • MINDLESS BEHAVIOR • MIRANDA LAMBERT • MISS MAY I • MISSION TRANSMISSION • MODEST MOUSE • MODESTEP • THE MONKEES • MONSTER TRUCK • MONTGOMERY GENTRY • MOODY BLUES • MOTLEY CRUE • MY CHEMICAL ROMANCE • NAS • NEVEREST • NEON TREES • NEW EDITION • THE NEW SHINING • NICK FRADIANI • NICK JONAS • NICKELBACK • NICKI MINAJ • NICO VEGA • NICOLE SCHERZINGER • NINE INCH NAILS • NKOTB • NO DOUBT • NOAH BENARDOUT • NOEL GALLAGHER'S HIGH FLYING BIRDS • NORMAN BROWN • NOSTALGHIA • O.A.R. • OF MICE AND MEN • OLLY MURS • ONE REPUBLIC • OPERATOR PLEASE • OPETH • THE ORANGE EFFECT • OUR LAST NIGHT • OWL CITY • OZZY OSBOURNE • PALOMA FAITH • PANDORA • PAPA ROACH • PAPER TONGUES • PASSION PIT • PATRICK WOLF • PAUL BRANDT • PENNYWISE • PENTATONIX • PETER GABRIEL • PETSHOP BOYS • PHANTOGRAM • PHARRELL WILLIAMS • PHILLIP PHILLIPS • PHOENIX • PIERCE THE VEIL • P!NK • PITBULL • PIXIE LOTT BAND • THE PIXIES • POLARIS AT NOON • POP EVIL • POST MALONE • THE PRETTY RECKLESS • PRINCE BAND • PRINTZ BOARD • PROFESSOR GREEN • PUFF DIDDY • PUNCH BROTHERS • PVRIS • PUSCIFER • QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE • R. KELLY • R5 • RACHEL CROW • RAE SREMMURD • RAMMSTEIN • RANDY HOUSER • RASCALL FLATTS • RED LINE CHEMISTRY • RICI JO • RICKY MARTIN • RICO LOVE • RIHANNA • RISE AGAINST • RITA ORA • ROB THOMAS • ROBBIE WILLIAMS BAND •
ROCK OF AGES ON TOUR • RODNEY HOWARD • ROGER WATERS’ THE WALL TOUR • THE ROLLING STONES • RUMMER WILLIS • RUSH • ST. VINCENT • ST. LUCIA • SALIVA • SAM HUNT • SAM SMITH • SAM WARSHAW • SAN CISCO • SANTIGOLD • THE SATURDAYS • SAVING ABEL • SCISSOR SISTERS • SCORPION • SCOTT STAPP • SEAN ALEXANDER • SEBASTIAN BACH • SEBASTIAN INGROSSO • SEETHER • SEGARRA • SEIGMEN • SELENA GOMEZ • SEVENDUST • "SGT. PEPPER LIVE" FEATURING CHEAP TRICK • SHAKIRA • SHARON AGUILAR • SHANE DUNCAN BAND • SHEILA E. • SHEILA MAJID • SHINEDOWN • SIA • SIGUR ROS • THE SILVER BULLET BAND • SILVERSUN PICKUPS • SIMMONE JONES • SIMONE BATTLE • SKIP DORSEY • SKYLAR GREY • SLASH BAND • SLAYER • SLIPKNOT • SMASHING PUMPKINS • SMOKIE • SOCIAL DISTORTION • SOIL • SOLANGE • SONATA ARCTICA • SONGA LEE • STAIND • STARSHELL • STEEL PANTHER • STEELY DAN • STEREO SHOUT OUT • STEVE AUGERI • STEVE RODRIGUEZ • STEVE VAI • STING • THE STONE ROSES • STONE SOUR • STRATOVARIUS • THE STRUTS • STRYPER • SUBLIME WITH ROME • SUEDE • SULLY ERNA BAND • SUM 41 • SYSTEM OF A DOWN • T.I. • T-PAIN • TALA • TAME IMPALA • TANK • TAYLOR BURRISE • TAYLORED • TEARS FOR FEARS • TEEL MERRICK • TEI SHI • TENACIOUS D • TERRY ILOUS OF GREAT WHITE • TESTAMENT • THEFT • THEOPHILUS LONDON • THE TEMPER TRAP • THREE DAYS GRACE • TIMBALAND • TIM MCGRAW • TIM OWENS • TIMBALAND • TINASHE • TOOL • TONIC • TONY SAVAGE • TOOL • TOTO • TRACE ADKINS • TRAIN • TRAVIS BARKER • TRAVIS TRITT • TREY SONGZ • TRILLIUM VEIN • TRISHA YEARWOOD • TRIVIUM • TWENTY ONE PILOTS • TWO DOOR CINEMA CLUB • TY DOLLA $IGN • U2 • UNION J • THE USED • VAIN • VAMPIRE WEEKEND • VAN HALEN • VANCE JOY • VINCE STAPLES • VIRUS • THE VOICE TV SHOW 2011, 2012 • VOLBEAT • WALT DISNEY WORLD • THE WANTED • THE WAR ON DRUGS • WARRANT • WE ARE THE FALLEN • THE WEEKND • WEEZER • WELL HUNGARIANS • WHITESNAKE • WIZ KHALIFA • THE WHO • WILD BEAST • WINTERSUN • THE WOMBATS • X FACTOR • X-JAPAN • YOUNG GUNS • YOUNG THE GIANT • YOUNGBLOOD HAWKE • YOUTH LAGOON • ZAC BROWN BAND • ZAYN MALIK • ZELLA DAY • ZZ WARD • AND MANY MORE...