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Schiit Happened: The Story of the World's Most Improbable Start-Up - Page 12

post #166 of 14510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Stoddard View Post
 
 a post on smokingmeatforum.com

 

LOL I literally did a triple take on that.  Apparently they're bigger than I realized (been hanging out there a good bit due to getting into smoking meats).  Anyway, really enjoying this so far and looking forward to the rest!

post #167 of 14510

"But she challenged me enough to keep pushing, keep expanding what I could do."  She did this by perpetually asking for a new car we couldn't afford at the time and insisting we buy organic ...  :wink_face: 

post #168 of 14510
Thread Starter 

Lisa actually hates new cars. Her daily driver is a 1968 Mustang fastback that she bought in 1993 and restored herself. She does like organics, though...

post #169 of 14510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Stoddard View Post
 

Lisa actually hates new cars. Her daily driver is a 1968 Mustang fastback that she bought in 1993 and restored herself. She does like organics, though...

I have to say that I enjoy reading this thread.

 

Now, I have a question about marketing and Schiit. Have you guys tried to send free review samples to the more "mainstream"/"huge" online publications, such as The Verge? There are two reasons I'm asking:

 

1) It seems to me that a favorable review by those "rockstars" could be a "make it or break it" deal, especially for smaller companies, don't you think?

2) I'm curious to know if you have tried, and why it didn't work out (I haven't seen any Schiit reviews on the Verge, but I have seen V-Moda there).

 

Why I chose The Verge specifically is because, first of all, I'm an avid reader but second and possibly most important, they seem just "crazy" enough to actually review your product. I mean, you have everything in favor for you: name, pricing (especially Magni, Modi), "Made in USA" and beautiful design that would propbably sell more to the mainstream than a black box with a red glowy LCD screen.

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I have a sneaky suspicion that it wouldn't just cost you a "free sample", so to speak. That maybe they'd like a "restaurant visit" as well, where you guys would "accidently" drop a stack of money under the table...

Edited by Coq de Combat - 2/5/14 at 10:19pm
post #170 of 14510

>Corollary 5: on the other hand, micro-social almost always works, unless you’re a dick.

 

This probably can't be over-emphasized enough. I've seen it work for the teeny (then tiny, and now not so tiny) company I started working for that I had never heard of before. Of course, everyone in their industry knew about them and basically had warm fuzzy feelings and that was/is enough.

 

Also, the "unless you're a dick" bit is really crucial especially when small because you-the-owner/you-the-one-and-only-engineer are what everyone sees/interacts with.

 

We've heard back from customers about how they really appreciate that we took the time to actually interact one-on-one with people on their own turf (be it conference sessions, physical on-site visits, or even travelling to another country) on their own terms.

post #171 of 14510

Ooh Jason, I have a question which I'm hoping isn't too personal - don't answer if it is.  I was wondering why you chose to use a pseudonym for your published works ?  The reason why I am wondering this is that, if I were ever published, I would be so proud and want EVERYONE to know I'd written a book - even the people I didn't know ... Heck, I'd be on the streets all day telling strangers ! 


Edited by NinjaHamster - 2/6/14 at 12:38am
post #172 of 14510
Quote:
Originally Posted by UmustBKidn View Post
 

I'm all ears...

 


Extra credit if you actually know what that thing in the picture is

post #173 of 14510
Quote:
Originally Posted by HPiper View Post
 


Extra credit if you actually know what that thing in the picture is

The Audeze LCD-4 prototypes ?

post #174 of 14510
Originally Posted by HPiper View Post


Extra credit if you actually know what that thing in the picture is

 

Madonna's bra (circa 1920) ?

post #175 of 14510
Quote:
Originally Posted by HPiper View Post


Extra credit if you actually know what that thing in the picture is
post #176 of 14510
Quote:
Originally Posted by HPiper View Post


Extra credit if you actually know what that thing in the picture is
World War 2 (or there abouts) long distance hearing amplifier. They were used to detect aircraft while they were still far away.
post #177 of 14510
This is a war-time aircraft listening equipment.
Edited by Jin Puan - 2/6/14 at 1:54am
post #178 of 14510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jin Puan View Post

This is a war-time bomb equipment.
early warning horn perhaps?
post #179 of 14510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmyw View Post

 

It's amazing how ubiquitous terrible behavior, outright lies and illegal acts are in major corporations (Well, any entity) to do with retail, and yet nothing ever seems to be done about it. I walked out of my job because I was tired of corrupt, immoral and unempathetic acts and strategies. Sometimes outright illegal behavior and actions. Yet if you didn't tow the line you were completely vilified.

I applaud you for your ethics good sir, at least I know there are some others like me out there and the world isn't completely corrupt. Yet. :beerchug: 

 

Or even small ones. I used to sell computers at Apple resellers in a large city. Various competitors have ended up in court for fraud over the years since, and that is the stuff they found out about. I will not say what happened to one place I worked at, but I'm glad I moved away from computer-related work in the end.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZianC View Post
 

>Corollary 5: on the other hand, micro-social almost always works, unless you’re a dick.

 

This probably can't be over-emphasized enough. I've seen it work for the teeny (then tiny, and now not so tiny) company I started working for that I had never heard of before. Of course, everyone in their industry knew about them and basically had warm fuzzy feelings and that was/is enough.

 

Also, the "unless you're a dick" bit is really crucial especially when small because you-the-owner/you-the-one-and-only-engineer are what everyone sees/interacts with.

 

We've heard back from customers about how they really appreciate that we took the time to actually interact one-on-one with people on their own turf (be it conference sessions, physical on-site visits, or even travelling to another country) on their own terms.

 

Someone pointed out how at the various audio-related forums, different, small and obscure brands are popular. I think Gear Slutz was given as an example -- they have a bunch of popular brands there I've never heard of. Many of the popular brands here are fairly unheard-of on other forums, though 6moons and other sites have seen to it that some became known elsewhere.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Stoddard View Post
 
heat-activated urinal billboards

 

ROFL!

 

What your story reminds me of, especially when you wrote about advertising agencies, is this blog post.

 

About GenY -- I guess want a connection, not just a product. It certainly makes the hobby more fun.

 

The reference to Apple is a good one. What always struck me about Apple, especially starting with the product is, they kept it simple. "This is an iPod. It stores and plays music. Finish." then the slightly more complex version of that for the iPhone and iPad, then "Look at what people do with their iPads!". This instead of "Look at all the features in our product!" that wont be used. I think the latter companies think they are thinking of the customer, but they are, as you say, afraid. I could give examples using people and companies in the headphone and audio industry, but I know you've already done that.

 

I could rant more, but I'll save it for a hopeful future chat over a drink at a future meet. :beerchug:

post #180 of 14510

Jason  I just discovered this thread and find it very interesting. Great stuff and thanks for doing this. 

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