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DIY Custom Amplifier and DAC- Project H - Page 3

post #31 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

The coolest mod on head fi smily_headphones1.gif

confused.gif

post #32 of 94
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post

confused.gif
You dont know the coolest mod on head fi? Its Amos!!
post #33 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post


You dont know the coolest mod on head fi? Its Amos!!

unheard of tongue.gif

post #34 of 94
Thread Starter 
Ii
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post

unheard of tongue.gif
its currawong yo
post #35 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post

silkscreen is adding stuff (ink)

engrave is removing stuff (coating)

 

which one are you doing?

 

So the one used to add the words on the P-H is silkscreen?

 

The one that you did on deadly's and eve's is what? Engraving?

 

I might be doing based on these factors :

- Colour availability

- Price

post #36 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by graphidz View Post

 

So the one used to add the words on the P-H is silkscreen?

 

The one that you did on deadly's and eve's is what? Engraving?

 

I might be doing based on these factors :

- Colour availability

- Price

Engraving would be one color only (metal color)

And silkscreen is limited to just a few colors, with the price of each additional color being a bit more than the first. Silkscreening will be better in the long term though, as you're not exposing bare metal.

post #37 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechgamer123 View Post

Engraving would be one color only (metal color)

And silkscreen is limited to just a few colors, with the price of each additional color being a bit more than the first. Silkscreening will be better in the long term though, as you're not exposing bare metal.


laser engraving is actually white (or brown), because it burns a very thin layer off the top.
to the naked eye, it still looks like a flat surface.
all IC / transistor numbers are laser engraved.

post #38 of 94

you can "fill" engraved lettering with paint if specific colours are desired.

post #39 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechgamer123 View Post

Engraving would be one color only (metal color)

And silkscreen is limited to just a few colors, with the price of each additional color being a bit more than the first. Silkscreening will be better in the long term though, as you're not exposing bare metal.

This is incorrect.  Silkscreen can be removed with almost any paint stripper or even some thinners. Under a combination of the right conditions - sweat, alcohol, solder flux, etc. - it will come off anyway.

 

True laser etching of anodized aluminum is as permanent as the metal itself.  The laser-etching only burns off the top layer of dyed aluminum (it is not engraving).  What is exposed underneath is the bare aluminum anodizing (almost white), still fully protected from future corrosion. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post


laser engraving is actually white (or brown), because it burns a very thin layer off the top.
to the naked eye, it still looks like a flat surface.
all IC / transistor numbers are laser engraved.

I've never seen brown - at least with quality laser-etching.   It may be that someone didn't have the power turned up high enough on a black anodized specimen and the result was brown.  That's not the way to do it, though.  Anodized aluminum is dyed to achieve the color - the thickness of the actual anodizing underneath the dye is much thicker.  It continues for several ten-thousandths underneath the dye.  Proper laser-etching uses enough power to cut through the dye layer and not much more.  This is very easy to control and the visual feedback from the results are telltale.  If it's sulfuric anodizing (most common in our sub-culture), the underlying layer will be the same color as an oxidized piece of aluminum - almost white.  It will be permanent, corrosion proof, and still insulated from electrical current.

 

Finally - not all IC's are laser-engraved.  As stated above, it's not really engraving.  It's a question of difference in magnitude.  Etching may be in the ten-thousandths or less, while engraving is on the order of thousandths.  IC's were made for many years before laser-etching was available.  So, it's not necessarily true that all IC's are etched or engraved.  Alcohol can render many IC's completely blank.  I can show you plenty of Burr-Brown opamps whose designations do not last through multiple alcohol rinses. wink.gif

post #40 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomb View Post

I've never seen brown - at least with quality laser-etching.   It may be that someone didn't have the power turned up high enough on a black anodized specimen and the result was brown. 

 

That's not the way to do it, though.  Anodized aluminum is dyed to achieve the color - the thickness of the actual anodizing underneath the dye is much thicker.  It continues for several ten-thousandths underneath the dye.  Proper laser-etching uses enough power to cut through the dye layer and not much more.  This is very easy to control and the visual feedback from the results are telltale.  If it's sulfuric anodizing (most common in our sub-culture), the underlying layer will be the same color as an oxidized piece of aluminum - almost white.  It will be permanent, corrosion proof, and still insulated from electrical current.

 

Finally - not all IC's are laser-engraved.  As stated above, it's not really engraving.  It's a question of difference in magnitude.  Etching may be in the ten-thousandths or less, while engraving is on the order of thousandths.  IC's were made for many years before laser-etching was available.  So, it's not necessarily true that all IC's are etched or engraved.  Alcohol can render many IC's completely blank.  I can show you plenty of Burr-Brown opamps whose designations do not last through multiple alcohol rinses. wink.gif

Some of the results I got when engraving with 600dpi (instead of 1200dpi) is mostly white with a slight hint of brown...

Might be caused by the spacing between the dots.

 

Yeah burns off the thin layer of dye, that what I meant.

Me and my ambiguity :p

 

wait.. shouldn't etching be deeper?

it takes away material using chemicals right?
 

post #41 of 94
Thread Starter 

I think that the high gain has something to do with bass.

 

Using high gain increases the bass a tiny bit.

post #42 of 94

Damn, this thing looks sexy!  Nice job on this and congrats!

post #43 of 94
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KetchupNinja View Post

Damn, this thing looks sexy!  Nice job on this and congrats!
Thanks to Mechy and Borisu smily_headphones1.gif
post #44 of 94

Yeaaah there's weird distortion with bass when high gain is on.

post #45 of 94
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

Yeaaah there's weird distortion with bass when high gain is on.

I already mentioned that.

 

The DAC's output is too high and clips the O2 at high gain. 

 

smh.

 

I know... I know.

 

but the good news is that for someone like me who listens to music at....umm..loud volumes.

 

LCD2 and Q701 are driven on 'low' gain with no problems.


Edited by bowei006 - 4/1/13 at 7:32pm
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