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Voltage question

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Can someone shed some light on possible issues that could happen if someone used an amp (Corda Headfive) that was set at 240V in a country that uses 110V (Japan)
Wouldn't it potentially be worse to use an amp set at 120V in a country that uses 240V (overvoltage)?
Cheers!

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post #2 of 23
Isn't overvoltage just going to fry the amp?
post #3 of 23
Short answer - don't do it.
post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 
Overfry is exactly what I was thinkin
But what if it's underfry. Any need for concern?
post #5 of 23
If you are looking for an expensive paper weight.....
post #6 of 23
There is no universal answer to what will happen with supplying far too little voltage. The amp might simply misbehave, or fail to power up at all. It could also sustain damage. It isn't likely to blow up or cathc fire, which is what would be very likely to happen if you plugged a 110V device into 220V mains. But even that is a possible outcome. So yeah, as FallenAngel said - don't do it. There is no GOOD outcome - it certainly is not going to just work.

There are quite a few products that have "universal" power supplies that will work in almost any voltage, but this seems a rare case in headphone amps.
post #7 of 23
My experience with car audio and amplifiers receiving too little voltage is much more distortion - as plenty of people find out when they run their system hard without the engine switched on which loses you about 2v or so...

For conventional mains powered amps im guessing it simply wouldnt power up but cannot be sure.
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylab View Post
There are quite a few products that have "universal" power supplies that will work in almost any voltage, but this seems a rare case in headphone amps.
I agree with most of this, but to elaborate on this part specfically:
These universal devices typpically use switchmode power supplies which have FAR greater latitude for input voltages.

Most headphone amps run on linear power supplies (thank goodness, switchers suck) which require that the mains voltages be within a certain tolerance. so to agree with everyone else, dont do it.

Running a 120V device on 240 is generally worse than 240 on 120 but its best not to tempt fate.
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
Great responses, thanks guys!
There's still sound comin from the amp, so I guess it could be worse
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylab View Post
There is no universal answer to what will happen with supplying far too little voltage. The amp might simply misbehave, or fail to power up at all. It could also sustain damage. It isn't likely to blow up or cathc fire, which is what would be very likely to happen if you plugged a 110V device into 220V mains. But even that is a possible outcome. So yeah, as FallenAngel said - don't do it. There is no GOOD outcome - it certainly is not going to just work.

There are quite a few products that have "universal" power supplies that will work in almost any voltage, but this seems a rare case in headphone amps.
Interesting Audio Cubes 11 is selling Luxman amps with 100V with a transformer included that conerts the voltage. I was looking at the Luxman 504U is 900.00 less than distributorse seeling here and that includes the shipping, Also the Luxman 100 is 1000k less than being sold here.
post #11 of 23
I have a Leben amp from Japan that is 100V. I use a step-down transformer to go from the 120V here to the 100V - cost me $25. MUCH better idea than plugging an amp designed for 100V into 120V (especially since the voltage in my house is normally more like 125V).
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylab View Post
I have a Leben amp from Japan that is 100V. I use a step-down transformer to go from the 120V here to the 100V - cost me $25. MUCH better idea than plugging an amp designed for 100V into 120V (especially since the voltage in my house is normally more like 125V).
Where did you get the transsformer and how much was the Leben. Do you the headphone amp or the intergrated amp.
post #13 of 23
post #14 of 23
If you plug a 220V configured amp into a 110V mains outlet the amp’s power supply will put out roughly half the normal voltage. The amp might not work or it might be very distorted. Very unlikely to kill it though.

If you plug a 110V configured amp into a 220V outlet the amp’s power supply will put out roughly twice the normal voltage. This could damage the power supply, especially the reservoir capacitors (…hissssss…BANG) and the voltage regulators, might overheat the transformer, and might damage the amplification circuits. Not a good scenario.

Also when changing voltage on an amp remember to fit the correct fuse. i.e. for any given power the high voltage supply will draw a smaller current and vice versa, hence requiring a fuse change if you are to retain the same level of protection.

Universal voltage supplies are indeed the switch mode type. In theory they can be OK, but those fitted to cheap audio components are invariably designed down to a cost target not up to a performance level. Cheap for a reason! Those fitted into Chord power amps seem OK, but at a silly price.

: )
post #15 of 23
A universal switching supply can be perfectly fine though as a DC adapter for charging a battery which actually serves as the power supply
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