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Why Grado is for rock?

post #1 of 62
Thread Starter 
People say Grado is the best option for rock. Why?

Since a lot of my listening is rock (metal, hard rock, R&R, blues, alternative...) and STAX is kinda a risky purchase when it comes to rock, I'm thinking of getting the first Grado in my life. SR80 or SR125 I think. But I'm curious to know what maked it best for rock?

Thanks
post #2 of 62
Rock doesn't really need soundstage depth, which Grado just plain doesn't do at the low end of their lineup. Also, a lot of classic rock is kind of "muddy" sounding in the mix, and thus grados with their upper mids presence boost kind of counteract that. Finally they're very "quick" in that they can produce a lot of hard transients very fast without running into trouble, which is obviously important for rock.

That being said, I actually prefer Sennheiser for rock. And everything else for that matter.
post #3 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by fjrabon View Post
Rock doesn't really need soundstage depth, which Grado just plain doesn't do at the low end of their lineup. Also, a lot of classic rock is kind of "muddy" sounding in the mix, and thus grados with their upper mids presence boost kind of counteract that. Finally they're very "quick" in that they can produce a lot of hard transients very fast without running into trouble, which is obviously important for rock.

That being said, I actually prefer Sennheiser for rock. And everything else for that matter.
MUCH better than my answer would have been. Sounds like a good explanation to me.
post #4 of 62
totally agree about the soundstage and speed,and want to add that grado's magical mids can catch the guitar distorion the best. no other headphone can do that.
rock/metal is all about "in your face" because all the electric guitar distortion and such, and it is a very "mids driven" kind of music. that's why grado is so good with rock, it boosts the right frequencies which is mainly the mids and treble (for the drums crush and high hats) also the bass is very punchy...like you want it for metal.
post #5 of 62
Thread Starter 
Wow! I'm looking for a SR right now.

Such a dangerous place Head-Fi is when its have members like you guys
post #6 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by SillyHoney View Post
Wow! I'm looking for a SR right now.

Such a dangerous place Head-Fi is when its have members like you guys
thanks!

I only have/heard the RS1 but from what I read here the SR225 are the sweet spot in the SR line.
post #7 of 62
stax is also good at rock, btw.
post #8 of 62
Yes... look at the sr225i for rock... it's reasonably priced and kicks butt.
post #9 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by fjrabon View Post
Rock doesn't really need soundstage depth, which Grado just plain doesn't do at the low end of their lineup. Also, a lot of classic rock is kind of "muddy" sounding in the mix, and thus grados with their upper mids presence boost kind of counteract that. Finally they're very "quick" in that they can produce a lot of hard transients very fast without running into trouble, which is obviously important for rock.

That being said, I actually prefer Sennheiser for rock. And everything else for that matter.
I would also add that most popular rock doesn't need high resolution nor a wide dynamic range for a decent listen. If there is a grainess on the headphone rendering it might make rock sound more powerful, for these and the reasons fjrabon mentioned, Grado's do 'ok' with a certain group of commercial rock listeners, and thats it... For other more sophisticated forms of Rock they are terrible, imo, that is....
post #10 of 62
Thread Starter 
well, I almost pull the trigger for a RS225i on headphone.com...

But...

How is the bass on RS225i? Rock can never lack of bass right? Powerful kick drum, bass guitar , low-mid electric guitar riffs... Can RS225i handle those well?

Positive answers are the last thing I need before I type in my credit card information
post #11 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by SillyHoney View Post
well, I almost pull the trigger for a RS225i on headphone.com...

But...

How is the bass on RS225i? Rock can never lack of bass right? Powerful kick drum, bass guitar , low-mid electric guitar riffs... Can RS225i handle those well?

Positive answers are the last thing I need before I type in my credit card information
Seriously, dont do it! the Stax you bought will dramatically outperform the rs225i's in ANY genre!
post #12 of 62
Thread Starter 
Oh your answer is not what I expected but I guess you surely have good reasons to say so.

By the way, my wallet asked me to say thank to you. You have just save him from being abused $200 off

I will wait for the STAX first before making the next move then.
post #13 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by SillyHoney View Post
well, I almost pull the trigger for a RS225i on headphone.com...

But...

How is the bass on RS225i? Rock can never lack of bass right? Powerful kick drum, bass guitar , low-mid electric guitar riffs... Can RS225i handle those well?

Positive answers are the last thing I need before I type in my credit card information
I just got back from the local headphone store and brought back with me a new SR325is.

Grado bass in the SR series is what I call the art of illusion. It doesn't really go that deep but it has a hump or presence in just the right spot to give the kick drum some punch and drive. It manages to give the illusion that it is going lower than it actually does. You don't get the full 40hz thud of a kick drum like I do on my Denon D2000, but you do get a punch. An open headphone that can give you a kick drum punch is a good thing. The kick drum has the necessary punch to still drive the music.

The reason for the Grado and the reason I got them is for the midrange. The guitar riffs up front and there. Guitar distortion that is beautiful to hear. The Allman Brothers at Fillmore East on Grados can make you melt (at least it does for me).

I'm still spoiled by the lowness and fullness of the bass in my Denon D2000. But the D2000 is recessed in the midrange and I've been having to EQ them to get them to rock. No need to EQ the Grado. The D2000 is also more reserved. The Grado is more aggressive and can give an energy to rock that the D2000 sometimes lacks. The Grado is for when I want a more aggressive rock experience.

I've never heard the Stax that you've got listed. Can't offer a comparison.

The Grados do have faults and I bought them knowing those faults. You get the Grado for what they do well in spite of their quirks.
post #14 of 62
I found that with the SR325i's, all you get is guitars. they weren't for me i'm afraid. I'll stick with my lower end SR's and my MS-1's for now.
post #15 of 62
Wait for the Stax to come in and if you don't mind buying used and your still yearning for the Grado sound check out for sale forum.
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