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How to equalize your headphones: A Tutorial - Page 64

post #946 of 973

 

 

Thank you!! I stayed with v1.0 but found skins and 1 matches much better than the old orange one  (Dual screen screeny)

 

Found out where that weird name came from...lol...I thought it was German but it was just some random keystrokes...mystery solved:D 

post #947 of 973

I've already installed v1, but was looking to see if there were really any added benefits from their final version of posihfopit.

 

Will bookmark though, just in case.  Thanks!

post #948 of 973

Hello,

 

I have a few questions regarding this tutorial.

 

When you start using sinegen, do you press the power button as a song is playing?

 

Also what settings do you put the level (-db) at? By default it opens at -15 and when played with a song, the volume of the song is unchanged. However, the picture in the tutorial shows the levels set at 0, and when played with a song, the song's volume decreases slightly.

 

Using foobar2k with AKG Q701.


Edited by NoSo - 3/4/14 at 4:42pm
post #949 of 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoSo View Post
 

Hello,

 

I have a few questions regarding this tutorial.

 

When you start using sinegen, do you press the power button as a song is playing?

 

Also what settings do you put the level (-db) at? By default it opens at -15 and when played with a song, the volume of the song is unchanged. However, the picture in the tutorial shows the levels set at 0, and when played with a song, the song's volume decreases slightly.

 

Using foobar2k with AKG Q701.


I think you misread the tutorial.

 

Sinegen is used to seek the frequency response humps and valleys of your headphones, so you don't need to play any songs. Just press the power button, listen to the tone, and move the slider up and down until you can hear the tone becomes louder of softer on certain frequencies.

 

Most of the time you'll find the tone gets very loud between 7 - 8 kHz.

 

It is better if you do that to each channel separately by setting the level -100 on one of the channel. It's because left and right cups usually have different frequency response.


Edited by elkosith - 3/4/14 at 4:58pm
post #950 of 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by elkosith View Post
 


I think you misread the tutorial.

 

Sinegen is used to seek the frequency response humps and valleys of your headphones, so you don't need to play any songs. Just press the power button, listen to the tone, and move the slider up and down until you can hear the tone becomes louder of softer on certain frequencies.

 

Most of the time you'll find the tone gets very loud between 7 - 8 kHz.

 

It is better if you do that to each channel separately by setting the level -100 on one of the channel. It's because left and right cups usually have different frequency response.


Okay, thank you for the information.

 

Another question.

 

When using Electri-Q as a VST on Foobar, do you load it together within foobar as you play the pink noise? Or separate (as an application) from Foobar, and then load it (depending on what EQ you achieved) to play audio through the DSP/VST.

post #951 of 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoSo View Post
 


Okay, thank you for the information.

 

Another question.

 

When using Electri-Q as a VST on Foobar, do you load it together within foobar as you play the pink noise? Or separate (as an application) from Foobar, and then load it (depending on what EQ you achieved) to play audio through the DSP/VST.

You don't load Electri-Q separately. You need to load it inside Foobar, so that the music gets 'routed through' it.

post #952 of 973

Hey guys,

 

I'm not sure this has been mentioned earlier in the thread, but does someone have an equalisation method to recommend on Mac OS X?

post #953 of 973
http://www.head-fi.org/t/672716/the-999-vs-99-challenge-tour/495#post_10502877

Replace HybridReverb2 mentioned in this post with an AU parametric equalizer (I think there's one bundled with Macs)
post #954 of 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoomForce View Post
 

Hey guys,

 

I'm not sure this has been mentioned earlier in the thread, but does someone have an equalisation method to recommend on Mac OS X?


When I had my Macbook Pro setup as a music server, I used IZotope Ozone 5 which you can get here.   While it is aimed at mastering a recording session, it can be easily be used as an EQ.  It has other useful 'compression' features and great graphics displays that I liked.  You would need the basic program not the advanced.

 

edit:  I used the Ozone 5 with Audirvana Plus music player that integrates with iTunes.  Check it out here.


Edited by Rico613 - 5/4/14 at 10:38am
post #955 of 973

I've been finding peaks on my headphones and equalizing them successfully now, but a new problem has risen. When I play back a song and try listening to it with and without the EQ, I can 'feel' a loss of fidelity in the EQ profile with the chopped peaks, even when I've reduced the gain of the peaks only around 4dB. The width of my bands is no larger than 0.2 8va.  Is it supposed to feel this way? Especially when chopping that peak around 6800 kHz, the music sounds slightly muffled afterwards. What do you guys think?

post #956 of 973

I don't know what method you use to achieve the EQ, but muffled sound is the opposite of a well equalized signal.  When I switch from EQ to bypass (no EQ), it sounds like I've got cotton in my ears.  With the EQ the detail and sound stage are amazing.

post #957 of 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico613 View Post
 

I don't know what method you use to achieve the EQ, but muffled sound is the opposite of a well equalized signal.  When I switch from EQ to bypass (no EQ), it sounds like I've got cotton in my ears.  With the EQ the detail and sound stage are amazing.

 

Just the standard method of finding the peaks with a sine wave, then using a pink noise to flatten out the peaks. I takes about -7db for the peak at 6800 Hz (band width 200 Hz) to flatten out for me, but that results in a slightly muffled sound, which I perceive as loss of fidelity. 


Edited by DoomForce - 6/5/14 at 8:18am
post #958 of 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoomForce View Post
 

Just the standard method of finding the peaks with a sine wave, then using a pink noise to flatten out the peaks. I takes about -7db for the peak at 6800 Hz (band width 200 Hz) to flatten out for me, but that results in a slightly muffled sound, which I perceive as loss of fidelity. 


Someone using the 'standard method' should weigh in on this.  If I understand the method correctly it is to listen to a frequency sweep and then dampen perceived peaks with an EQ. 

 

I'm not sure how the pink noise factors in but that may be the source of the problem.  Pink noise is sometimes mislabeled white noise.  "Pink noise" is also used as a sleep aid, but that is essentially garbage noise.  Here is a good source of noise files, sign waves, square waves, etc. 

 

I'd try it without the pink noise.  Just adjust the EQ until the sweep sounds right.

post #959 of 973
By adjusting for the resonant frequency for the ear canal, aren't we modifying the signal in possibly negative way? Assuming that the sound engineer uses active monitors for proofing and recording, then that very well includes the resonant frequency of his ear canal. By, flattening these peaks, aren't we listening something not the way intended by him?
post #960 of 973

^ Not really.  Lots of things change the frequency response before the sound gets to our brain.  The source / DAC, cable interconnects, Amplifier, choice of vacuum tubes, headphone cable, headphones, outer ear, our inner ear, and our neurological response all have an effect on the frequencies we 'hear'.   Even headphones that are equalized using a frequency analyzer still need to be adjusted, to some extent, to the listener's experience.  It is a tricky process and needs to be practiced.  When it is done correctly there is an obvious improvement in the SQ. 

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