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Losing my sense of Audio Perception

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Has it ever happened to you that u listened to 8 different headphones through different sources.


and suddenly something happens.... u lose all your sense of Audio judgement for a week.

all the music ..be it mp3 or flac.

be it any source.. onboard, ipod, imod or external DAC like Zero...

be it any amp... GoVibe, .22, RSA...unless Gain is applied.

be it any Headphone... HD555, HD600, HD650..


everything sounds same.


This happened to me recently and for 4 days i couldnt listen to music...because i just felt it was all noise.
post #2 of 25
Eat Our Brains
post #3 of 25
That's odd. Maybe you need a break from your equipment.

Though, anything can have an effect on our perception, whether it be audio, visual etc.

Being stressed, relaxed, nervous, angry, or tired can change the way our brains interpret signals of any kind.

Sometimes I don't want to listen to music at all, other times I crave it. I have experienced similar symptoms as you, but normally after long sessions. I am more careful nowadays.
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nocturnal310 View Post
Has it ever happened to you that u listened to 8 different headphones through different sources.


and suddenly something happens.... u lose all your sense of Audio judgement for a week.

all the music ..be it mp3 or flac.

be it any source.. onboard, ipod, imod or external DAC like Zero...

be it any amp... GoVibe, .22, RSA...unless Gain is applied.
That should not be a concern. mp3, well encoded, sound similar to flac, except during quite rare moments.
Sources should sound the same... onboard is noisier, and a bit worse, but still difficult to make a difference with a good DAC.
Amp should sound the same too.

Get someone who has kept his sense of audio, and let him try to ABX the above gear... you should be conforted by the result.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nocturnal310 View Post
be it any Headphone... HD555, HD600, HD650
There, we have a bit of a situation. They sound quite different, though these three models have a similar overall coloration.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nocturnal310 View Post
This happened to me recently and for 4 days i couldnt listen to music...because i just felt it was all noise.
This is another story. For me all the above sound the same except the onboard audio and the mp3 (in rare cases), and of course the headphones, but I still enjoy music.
post #5 of 25
I've had an odd audio experience on a hot and humid day causing the air to feel dense. It cleared within a few hours though. Atmospheric pressure could have been higher that day too because my head felt congested.

Everything sounded "distant" even on my Grados.
post #6 of 25
I have this at the end of every single meet I've been to. It usually takes a day or two to restore. Sources and amps all sound the same, and even headphones are hard to distinguish. To me, it's much like doing calculus or drawing for eight hours straight, it just doesn't work. Overload?
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Overload?
That's exactly what it is. After a while, everything becomes a big blur. It's nothing unusual. You just need to take a little break. I would also think that it doesn't happen to everyone and that there are people that could listen to a variety of sources and cans for weeks on end and still have no problems hearing differences.
post #8 of 25
Burn out!

I take long breaks, sometimes months, in which music is only background or not turned on at all. I get the same problem when I overdo anything. Probably also why I never married.

Reminds me of an old Blue Oyster Cult song- "OD'ed On Life."
post #9 of 25
Or it could be a brain tumor............
post #10 of 25
Overload. Perfectly normal. For me, it's not so much that things sound the same but I get mentally tired of listening so intensely. Since I'm tired, I don't want to distinguish minute differenece in sound, and trying further just irritates me. Usually, I can just ignore the music, but sometimes I need to have silence. It usually lasts a few days to as much a week, and sometimes--rarely--more.

There's different angles to this. One is just getting tired of the stimulation. This might happen after a long concert or hours of being in a club, and I just want silence. Here, I'm usually listening, but not critically. A second is more mental, where I get tired of the mental exertion of thinking about the music or sound. This happens when playing music, listening intently to music, or at a meet, trying to hear slight differences in sound. Sometimes, I even get tired after listening to just one song--it happened to me recently on the subway after listening to Jessica by the Alman Brothers. Third, my ears start to hurt after too much loud music, which may be the only one of these where my ears are tired, rather than my brain.

It's probably worst at a meet listening to so many different things--short music clips and different equipment--and listening intently, concentrating, trying to discern minor differences. Something similar happens when club hopping and hearing all kinds of ugly music through horrible sound systems and yelling to hear each other. After a while, it all becomes just too much noise, and I want a nice quiet piano bar, or a quiet coffee bar (Irish coffee, usually). I try not to listen to too many things at a meet. I might have one or two things to do. At one meet, I had one goal, and compared well over a dozen amps to go with my current equipment. Only the amp was changed, not the source or headphones or cables or anything else. That's all I wanted to do because I know there's a limit. At some point, I stopped. You also need to save some brain bandwidth for interesting things that come up. So, I usually pick one unambitious goal for a meet, and maybe a second very small one.

I don't think our brain/ears are designed for this kind prolonged and intense listening. Imagine an animal hearing some noise it can't make out, staying up all night, listening intently, trying to figure out what it is, whether it can eat it or be eaten by it. The poor beastie would be exhausted by the mental exertion of all that intense listening after a few hours. Listening at a meet is kind of similar. If I buy that amp, will it eat me and my money or...
post #11 of 25
This is exactly what I was experiencing starting around three days ago and am still in this sort of "blurry" state...

I was so busy analyzing my CD's from classical to rock for a week straight. I jotted down points, good, bad, nuances and everything else I could hear about each album from all 3 headphones I have.

The following morning after I finished doing the analysis, I literally couldn't hear the difference between my earbuds and Edition 9... "Oh $h!*....." sprang to mind. This weekend I've been listening a lot less then I would like, but my perception is close to being back to normal.
post #12 of 25
Less caring, more music enjoying?
post #13 of 25
.
post #14 of 25
If you listen to the same stuff over and over, you must have it imprinted in memory. Your brain may be remembering the stuff you normally would hardly hear with worse gear. At least - it would be my case. I remember a girl who couldn't read properly. She had her own storybook at the class and she just 'read' it out loud. Fluently. If you gave her something she hasn't read a couple of times, she couldn't put a word together out of those letters. We were like 8 years old then. She was nice but a kind of annoying and noisy and manipulative. Uh, I'm off topic almost.
post #15 of 25
Yesterday, i listened to apple stock headphones which came with ipod nano. I was enjoying my music.
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